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Arctic indigenous peoples experience the nutrition transition with changing dietary patterns and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4764
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
H V Kuhnlein
O. Receveur
R. Soueida
G M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Canada. harriet.kuhnlein@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-53
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism
Population Groups
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Indigenous Peoples globally are part of the nutrition transition. They may be among the most extreme for the extent of dietary change experienced in the last few decades. In this paper, we report survey data from 44 representative communities from 3 large cultural areas of the Canadian Arctic: the Yukon First Nations, Dene/Métis, and Inuit communities. Dietary change was represented in 2 ways: 1) considering the current proportion of traditional food (TF) in contrast to the precontact period (100% TF); and 2) the amount of TF consumed by older vs. younger generations. Total diet, TF, and BMI data from adults were investigated. On days when TF was consumed, there was significantly less (P 40 y old consistently consumed more (P or = 30 kg/m(2)) of Arctic adults exceeded all-Canadian rates. Measures to improve nutrient-dense market food (MF) availability and use are called for, as are ways to maintain or increase TF use.
PubMed ID
15173410 View in PubMed
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