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Arctic indigenous peoples experience the nutrition transition with changing dietary patterns and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4764
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
H V Kuhnlein
O. Receveur
R. Soueida
G M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Canada. harriet.kuhnlein@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-53
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism
Population Groups
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Indigenous Peoples globally are part of the nutrition transition. They may be among the most extreme for the extent of dietary change experienced in the last few decades. In this paper, we report survey data from 44 representative communities from 3 large cultural areas of the Canadian Arctic: the Yukon First Nations, Dene/Métis, and Inuit communities. Dietary change was represented in 2 ways: 1) considering the current proportion of traditional food (TF) in contrast to the precontact period (100% TF); and 2) the amount of TF consumed by older vs. younger generations. Total diet, TF, and BMI data from adults were investigated. On days when TF was consumed, there was significantly less (P 40 y old consistently consumed more (P or = 30 kg/m(2)) of Arctic adults exceeded all-Canadian rates. Measures to improve nutrient-dense market food (MF) availability and use are called for, as are ways to maintain or increase TF use.
PubMed ID
15173410 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 24-hour recalls of 164 fourth- to sixth-grade Mohawk children in Kahnawake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205123
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jul;98(7):814-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

Nutrient intake of food bank users is related to frequency of food bank use, household size, smoking, education and country of birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202423
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Apr;129(4):883-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
L. Jacobs Starkey
K. Gray-Donald
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, MacDonald Campus, Quebec.
Source
J Nutr. 1999 Apr;129(4):883-9
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Educational Status
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Income
Male
Micronutrients
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Quebec
Random Allocation
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Smoking
Urban Population
Abstract
The number of individuals and families accessing food assistance programs has continued to grow throughout the 1990s. Despite the increased health risk among low-income people, few studies have addressed nutrient intake throughout the month or at the end of the month when food and financial resources are thought to be compromised, and no study has described dietary status of a random sample of food bank users. Nutrient intakes of adult female and male food bank users in metropolitan Montreal, Quebec, Canada, were monitored week-by-week over a month by dietitian-administered 24-h recall interviews. A total of 428 participants from a stratified random sample of 57 urban area food banks completed all four interviews. Mean energy intake, as an indicator of diet quantity, was similar to other adult populations (10.2 +/- 4.8 and 7.9 +/- 3.6 MJ for men and women, respectively, age 18-49 y) and not related to sociodemographic variables except the expected biological variation of age and sex. Macronutrient intake was stable throughout the month. Overall median intakes of calcium, vitamin A, and zinc were below recommended levels for all age and sex groups. Intakes of several micronutrients were related to frequency of food bank use, household size, smoking, education, and country of birth. High nutrient intake variability characterized these adult food bank users.
PubMed ID
10203565 View in PubMed
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Decreasing traditional food use affects diet quality for adult Dene/M├ętis in 16 communities of the Canadian Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4866
Source
J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
O. Receveur
M. Boulay
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous People's Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec H9X 3V9, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-86
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Culture
Diet - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - standards
Dietary Fats - standards
Dietary Fiber - standards
Eating - physiology
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - administration & dosage
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
Potassium, Dietary - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Sex Factors
Vitamin A - standards
Abstract
We assessed diets in 16 Dene/Métis communities in the Canadian Arctic. We described nutrient intakes and identified nutrients at risk among adult Dene/Métis, evaluated the influence of traditional food on diet quality, and examined the direction of dietary change by comparing intergenerational and between-community differences in dietary intake. Diet varied according to sex, age and community. Nutrients of possibly inadequate intake (irrespective of subject sex, age or community) included calcium, vitamin A and folic acid. Dietary fiber intake was also of concern. Traditional food (animals and plants harvested from the local environment) was consumed on 65. 4% of interview days; on those days intakes of iron, zinc and potassium were higher (P
PubMed ID
9349845 View in PubMed
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