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Dietary intake of protein is positively associated with percent body fat in middle-aged and older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137784
Source
J Nutr. 2011 Mar;141(3):440-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Kathrine J Vinknes
Stefan de Vogel
Amany K Elshorbagy
Eha Nurk
Christian A Drevon
Clara G Gjesdal
Grethe S Tell
Stein E Vollset
Helga Refsum
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway. kathrine.vinknes@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Nutr. 2011 Mar;141(3):440-6
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adiposity
Aged
Aging
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Proteins - adverse effects
Female
Homeostasis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Data on associations between dietary intake of macronutrients and body composition in the general population are sparse. This population-based, cross-sectional study of 4478 middle-aged (47-49 y) and elderly (71-74 y) men and women from the Hordaland Health Study in western Norway was conducted using a validated FFQ and measurements by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The relation between macronutrient intake [percentage of total energy intake (E%)] and percent body fat was investigated in the total population and in a subgroup with intermediate BMI and stable weight (BMI within the 25th-75th percentile and weight change
PubMed ID
21248195 View in PubMed
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The nutritional strategy: four questions predict morbidity, mortality and health care costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260294
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Aug;33(4):634-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Randi J Tangvik
Grethe S Tell
John A Eisman
Anne Berit Guttormsen
Andreas Henriksen
Roy Miodini Nilsen
Jannike Øyen
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Aug;33(4):634-41
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Malnutrition - economics - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys - economics
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional care for hospital in-patients is potentially important but challenging.
To investigate the association between nutritional status and clinical outcomes.
Eight prevalence surveys were performed at Haukeland University Hospital, Norway, during 2008-2009. In total 3279 patients were classified as being at nutritional risk or not according to the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS 2002) tool. The initial four questions of NRS 2002 assess dietary intake, weight loss, body mass index (BMI) and illness severity.
The overall prevalence of nutritional risk was 29%. Adjusted mean days for hospitalisation was 8.3 days for patients at nutritional risk and 5.0 days for patients not at risk (p
PubMed ID
24094814 View in PubMed
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No increase in risk of hip fracture at high serum retinol concentrations in community-dwelling older Norwegians: the Norwegian Epidemiologic Osteoporosis Studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269988
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Nov;102(5):1289-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Kristin Holvik
Luai A Ahmed
Siri Forsmo
Clara G Gjesdal
Guri Grimnes
Sven Ove Samuelsen
Berit Schei
Rune Blomhoff
Grethe S Tell
Haakon E Meyer
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Nov;102(5):1289-96
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Aged
Calcifediol - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cod Liver Oil - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Elder Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Osteoporotic Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Norway has the highest hip fracture rates worldwide and a relatively high vitamin A intake. Increased fracture risk at high intakes and serum concentrations of retinol (s-retinol) have been observed in epidemiologic studies.
We aimed to study the association between s-retinol and hip fracture and whether high s-retinol may counteract a preventive effect of vitamin D.
We conducted the largest prospective analysis of serum retinol and hip fracture to date in 21,774 men and women aged 65-79 y (mean age: 72 y) who attended 4 community-based health studies during 1994-2001. Incident hip fractures occurring up to 10.7 y after baseline were retrieved from electronic hospital discharge registers. Retinol determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection in stored serum was available in 1154 incident hip fracture cases with valid body mass index (BMI) data and in a subcohort defined as a sex-stratified random sample (n = 1418). Cox proportional hazards regression weighted according to the stratified case-cohort design was performed.
There was a modest increased risk of hip fracture in the lowest compared with the middle quintile of s-retinol (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.82) adjusted for sex and study center. The association was attenuated after adjustment for BMI and serum concentrations of a-tocopherol (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.88, 1.51). We found no increased risk in the upper compared with the middle quintile. No significant interaction between serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and s-retinol on hip fracture was observed (P = 0.68).
We found no evidence of an adverse effect of high serum retinol on hip fracture or any interaction between retinol and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. If anything, there tended to be an increased risk at low retinol concentrations, which was attenuated after control for confounders. We propose that cod liver oil, a commonly used food supplement in Norway, should not be discouraged as a natural source of vitamin D for fracture prevention.
PubMed ID
26377161 View in PubMed
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