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Validity of a single item food security questionnaire in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104271
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helga Bjørnøy Urke
Zhirong R Cao
Grace M Egeland
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Assess sensitivity and specificity of each of the 18 US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Household Food Security Scale Module (HFSSM) questionnaire items to determine whether a rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible in an Inuit population.
Food insecurity prevalence was assessed by the 18-item USDA HFSSM in a randomized sample of Inuit households participating in the Inuit Health Survey and the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. Questions were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, predictive value (+/2), and total percent accuracy for adult and child food insecurity (yes/no). Child food security items were evaluated for both surveys.
For children, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when it was not possible to feed the children a healthy meal because there was not enough money?” had the best performance in both samples with a sensitivity and specificity of 92.3% and 97.3%, respectively, for the Inuit Health Survey, and 88.5% and 95.4% for the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. For adults, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when the food for you and your family just did not last and there was no money to buy more?” demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 93.4%.
Rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible and may be a useful tool for health care and social service providers. However, as prevalence and severity of food insecurity change over time, rapid assessment techniques should not replace periodic screening by using the full USDA HFSSM questionnaire.
PubMed ID
24864166 View in PubMed
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Emerging obesity and dietary habits among James Bay Cree youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144210
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Nov;13(11):1829-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Cynthia Bou Khalil
Louise Johnson-Down
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition and Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21,111 Lakeshore Road, Ste Anne de Bellevue, H9X 3V9, Québec, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Nov;13(11):1829-37
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - ethnology
Quebec - ethnology
Vegetables
Abstract
To describe dietary habits and extent of overweight and obesity among Cree youth.
Dietary intake and habits were assessed by a 24 h recall and FFQ as part of a cross-sectional survey.
Three Cree communities in northern Québec, Canada.
A total of 125 youth aged 9-18 years.
Overall 67·6 % of the study population was either at risk of overweight or overweight. Over 98 % had a usual saturated fat intake over 10 % of energy while 65 % had a lower consumption of fruit/vegetables and 95 % had a lower consumption of milk and milk products than recommended by Canada's Food Guide. The majority (96·8 %) consumed high-fat foods (>40 % of total energy as fat), which accounted for 39 % of total energy intake (EI). Similarly, 92·8 % consumed high-sugar food and beverages (>25 % of total energy as sugar), which accounted for 12·8 % of total EI. Furthermore, 95 % of the youth had a Healthy Eating Index (HEI) below the recommended score of 80 or above. Certain measures of diet quality (traditional food (TF) consumption, HEI and vegetables and fruit consumption) were significantly correlated with adiposity measures.
A high prevalence of low-diet quality was found with a high degree of sugar and fat intake and a low consumption of vegetables/fruit and milk/milk alternates and any weekly TF. Dietary interventions are sorely needed.
PubMed ID
20392310 View in PubMed
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Traditional food intake is correlated with iron stores in Canadian Inuit men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126574
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):764-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Jennifer A Jamieson
Hope A Weiler
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):764-70
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - physiopathology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Ferritins - blood
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Inuits
Iron - administration & dosage - adverse effects - deficiency
Iron Overload - blood - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status - ethnology
Prevalence
Receptors, Transferrin - blood - chemistry
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Accelerated loss of traditional lifestyles may place Inuit at risk of iron depletion given that anemia has been observed among Arctic men. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia, storage iron depletion, and iron overload and to identify correlates of iron status in Canadian Inuit men. In a cross-sectional survey of 994 men in the International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey, 2007-2008, hemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), soluble transferrin receptor (on a subset), CRP, RBC fatty acid composition, and Helicobacter pylori serology were measured in venous blood drawn from fasting men. Anthropometric, dietary, sociodemographic, and health data were collected. Dietary and nondietary correlates of iron status were assessed with multiple linear and logistic models. For men with CRP =10 mg/L (n = 804), 6.5% had depleted, 19.8% had low, and 10.3% had elevated iron stores. Anemia was moderately prevalent (16.1%), but iron deficiency anemia was less common (2.4%). There was a low probability of dietary iron inadequacy (2.4% Tolerable Upper Intake Level). Food-insecure men and those without a household hunter had a higher risk of low or depleted iron stores. Adiposity, traditional food intake, long-chain RBC PUFA status, and inflammation were positively associated with SF and food insecurity, smoking, and H. pylori seropositivity were negatively associated with SF. Despite a moderate prevalence of anemia, iron stores are largely adequate in this population, although lower than expected based on iron intake. The regulation of iron metabolism in this population and the high prevalence of anemia in older men warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
22378332 View in PubMed
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