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Assessment of dietary intake among Inuvialuit in Arctic Canada using a locally developed quantitative food frequency questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258889
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2014;33(2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Fariba Kolahdooz
Lauren Butler
Madalina Lupu
Tony Sheehy
Andre Corriveau
Sangita Sharma
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2014;33(2):147-54
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Questionnaires
Abstract
Inuvialuit in Arctic Canada are experiencing a nutritional and lifestyle transition, characterized by a declining consumption of traditional foods, increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense store-bought foods (NNDF), and reduced levels of physical activity with a concurrent rise in chronic diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine dietary intake of Inuvialuit adults in the Northwest Territories, Canada, using a culturally specific, validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ).
A cross-sectional dietary survey of 213 randomly selected adults (=19 years) was conducted in 3 remote communities in the Northwest Territories. Nonparametric analysis was used to compare mean nutrient intake, dietary inadequacy, and differences in nutrient density among men and women. Data were also analyzed to determine the top food groups contributing to energy and selected nutrients.
With response rates of 65% to 85%, 43 men (mean age 43.2 ± 12.8) and 170 women (mean age 44.7 ± 13.9) completed the QFFQ. Mean daily energy intakes for men were 3478 ± 1474 kcal and for women they were 3299 ± 1653 kcal. For both sexes, protein, carbohydrates, and fat provided approximately 16%, 47%, and 28% of energy intake, respectively. NNDFs were the top contributors to energy (39%), fat (40%), carbohydrate (54%), sugar (74%), and sodium (23%) intake. Total traditional foods from the land, sea, and sky such as polar bear and wild birds contributed 11% of energy and 41% of protein intake. Most participants' daily intakes were below recommended levels for dietary fiber; vitamins A, E, and D; potassium; and magnesium. Mean daily energy, saturated fat, and sodium intakes exceeded recommendations.
We identified nutrient inadequacies and characterized food consumption among Inuvialuit. These data support nutritional interventions that encourage consumption of traditional foods. The cultural and ethnic differences in Canadian Arctic populations require specific tailoring of public health interventions and policy using population specific tools to meet local needs.
PubMed ID
24724772 View in PubMed
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Dietary adequacy of vitamin D and calcium among Inuit and Inuvialuit women of child-bearing age in Arctic Canada: a growing concern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106191
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e78987
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Fariba Kolahdooz
Alison Barr
Cindy Roache
Tony Sheehy
Andre Corriveau
Sangita Sharma
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e78987
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Nutritional Status - ethnology
Questionnaires
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Arctic populations are at an increased risk of vitamin D inadequacy due to geographic latitude and a nutrition transition. This study aimed to assess the adequacy of dietary vitamin D and calcium among women of child-bearing age in Arctic Canada.
This study collected data from 203 randomly selected women of child-bearing age (19-44 years) in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories of Arctic Canada. Cross-sectional surveys using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire were analysed to determine the dietary adequacy of vitamin D and calcium and summarize the top foods contributing to vitamin D and calcium intake among traditional food eaters (TFE) and non-traditional food eaters (NTFE).
The response rate was between 69-93% depending on the community sampled. Mean BMIs for both TFE and NTFE were above the normal range. Traditional food eaters had a significantly higher median vitamin D intake compared with non-traditional eaters (TFE=5.13 ± 5.34 µg/day; NTFE=3.5 ± 3.22 µg/day, p=0·004). The majority of women (87%) were below the Estimated Average Requirements (EAR) for vitamin D. Despite adequate median daily calcium intake in both TFE (1,299 ± 798 mg/day) and NTFE (992 ± 704 mg/day; p=0.0005), 27% of the study population fell below the EAR for calcium. Dairy products contributed the most to intake of vitamin D (TFE=30.7%; NTFE=39.1%) and calcium (TFE=25.5%; NTFE=34.5%).
Inadequate dietary vitamin D intake is evident among Inuit and Inuvialuit women of child-bearing age in Arctic Canada. Promotion of nutrient-rich sources of traditional foods, supplementation protocols and/or expanded food fortification should be considered to address this nutrition concern.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24223871 View in PubMed
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Frequency of consumption of foods and beverages by Inuvialuit adults in Northwest Territories, Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125489
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2012 Nov;63(7):782-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Francis Zotor
Tony Sheehy
Madalina Lupu
Fariba Kolahdooz
Andre Corriveau
Sangita Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2012 Nov;63(7):782-9
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Beverages - adverse effects
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Quality
Health Transition
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Rural Health - ethnology
Abstract
Limited data exist regarding nutrient intakes and overall dietary quality in Canadian Arctic populations. This cross-sectional study determined the frequency of consumption of traditional meats (e.g. caribou, polar bear, seal, char and whale) and non-traditional store-bought foods including non-traditional meats (e.g. beef, pork and chicken), grains, dairy, fruits, vegetables and non-nutrient dense foods (NNDFs) (e.g. butter, chocolate, chips, candy and pop) by Inuvialuit adults (175 women, mean age 44 ± 14 years; 55 men, mean age 41 ± 13 years) in three remote communities in the Northwest Territories. Using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire, frequency of consumption over a 30-day period was determined for 141 commonly reported foods. Mean consumption of traditional meats (1.6 times/day), fruits (1 time/day) and vegetables (0.6 times/day) was less frequent than that of NNDFs (5.0 times/day). Nutritional intervention strategies are needed to promote more frequent consumption of nutrient-rich foods and less frequent consumption of NNDFs in these Arctic communities.
PubMed ID
22475024 View in PubMed
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