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Regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals increases risk of overweight among preschool-aged children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163350
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jun;107(6):924-34; discussion 934-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Lise Dubois
Anna Farmer
Manon Girard
Kelly Peterson
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. lise.dubois@uottawa.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jun;107(6):924-34; discussion 934-5
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Body Height
Body Weight
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Recall
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Overweight
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the relationship between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (eg, nondiet carbonated drinks and fruit drinks) and the prevalence of overweight among preschool-aged children living in Canada.
Data come from the Longitudinal Study of Child Development in Québec (1998-2002).
A representative sample (n=2,103) of children born in 1998 in Québec, Canada. A total of 1,944 children (still representative of the same-age children in this population) remaining at 4 to 5 years in 2002 participated in the nutrition study.
Data were collected via 24-hour dietary recall interview. Frequency of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals at age 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5 years was recorded and children's height and weight were measured. Multivariate regression analysis was done with Statistical Analysis System software. Weighted data were adjusted for within-child variability and significance level was set at 5%.
Overall, 6.9% of children who were nonconsumers of sugar-sweetened beverages between meals between the ages of 2.5 to 4.5 years were overweight at 4.5 years, compared to 15.4% of regular consumers (four to six times or more per week) at ages 2.5 years, 3.5 years, and 4.5 years. According to multivariate analysis, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals more than doubles the odds of being overweight when other important factors are considered in multivariate analysis. Children from families with insufficient income who consume sugar-sweetened beverages regularly between the ages of 2.5 and 4.5 years are more than three times more likely to be overweight at age 4.5 years compared to nonconsuming children from sufficient income households.
Regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals may put some young children at a greater risk for overweight. Parents should limit the quantity of sweetened beverages consumed during preschool years because it may increase propensity to gain weight.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2008 Jan;11(1):2418192529
Comment In: J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Jan;108(1):34-5; author reply 3518155984
PubMed ID
17524711 View in PubMed
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Identification and treatment of protein-energy malnutrition in renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145044
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kari McKnight
Anna Farmer
Lyn Zuberbuhler
Diana Mager
Author Affiliation
Regional Nutrition and Food Services, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):27-32
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Enteral Nutrition - methods
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Evidence-Based Practice
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Internet
Interviews as Topic
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Nutrition Surveys - methods
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Parenteral Nutrition - methods
Protein-Energy Malnutrition - diagnosis - therapy
Questionnaires
Renal Dialysis - standards
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
A web-based cross-country survey of renal registered dietitians (RRDs) was launched. It was used to assess whether or not their clinical practice in identifying and treating protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) in adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and dialysis was based on current nutrition practice guidelines (NPGs). The survey included questions on strategies, timelines, and markers used for the identification and treatment of PEM. Fifty-nine RRDs responded (21%). Sixty-seven percent did not base clinical practice on NPGs, while 33% indicated they followed the guidelines. Of those who followed guidelines, 76% use the National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. Strategies used to identify and treat PEM were not related to duration of RRD experience in nephrology, but were significantly different between guidelines users and non-users. Guideline users commonly used key nutrition treatment strategies that included enteral/parenteral nutrition and medication therapy. The clinical practice of RRD is typically based on expert opinion/consensus, rather than on evidence-based practice guidelines (EBPG). It remains unclear if differences in RRDs' adoption of clinical guidelines influences patient outcomes, particularly in the treatment of PEM. Up-to-date EBPG need to be developed for the identification and treatment of PEM in patients with ESRD.
PubMed ID
20205975 View in PubMed
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Demographic and socio-economic factors related to food intake and adherence to nutritional recommendations in a cohort of pre-school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137178
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Jun;14(6):1096-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Lise Dubois
Anna Farmer
Manon Girard
Daniel Burnier
Marion Porcherie
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, 1 Stewart Street, Office 303, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada. ldubois@uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Jun;14(6):1096-104
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Diet - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Quebec
Questionnaires
Schools
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To examine: (i) children's food intake and adherence to both Canada's Food Guide for Healthy Eating and Dietary Reference Intakes; and (ii) the social and demographic factors related to children's food intake.
A cross-sectional study.
Data were obtained through the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development 1998-2010, a representative sample (n 2103) of children born in 1998 in the province of Quebec, Canada. Information on energy, macronutrient and food consumption was derived from responses to a 24 h dietary recall interview addressed to children's mothers and day-care staff when the children were 4 years old.
A total of 1549 children aged 4 years who participated in a nutritional sub-study.
The mean daily total energy intake was 6360 kJ (1520 kcal) for girls and 6916 kJ (1653 kcal) for boys. For boys and girls alike, energy intake was comprised of approximately 54 % carbohydrates, 31 % fats and 15 % proteins. The mean number of servings consumed from each of the four essential food groups closely approached the dietary recommendations made by Canada's Food Guide for Healthy Eating; however,
PubMed ID
21306668 View in PubMed
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