Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Intake of alkylresorcinols from wheat and rye in the United Kingdom and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61453
Source
Br J Nutr. 2005 Oct;94(4):496-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Alastair B Ross
Wulf Becker
Yan Chen
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Per Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@lmv.slu.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2005 Oct;94(4):496-9
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Bread
Diet
Female
Food analysis
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Resorcinols - analysis
Secale cereale
Seeds
Sweden
Triticum
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols, phenolic lipids present in high amounts in whole-grain wheat and rye but not present in appreciable amounts in other foods, are candidates as biomarkers of whole-grain intake from these cereals. We estimated the intake of alkylresorcinols in Sweden and the UK using two different methods: food supply data (FSD); food consumption data (FCD; based on individual and household survey data). The average per capita intake of alkylresorcinols in Sweden was 17.5 mg/d (FSD) and 22.9 (sd 16.6) mg/d (FCD), while in the UK it was 11.9 mg/d (FSD) and 11.8 (sd 18.62) mg/d (FCD). Ninety-six per cent of all Swedes consumed some alkylresorcinols, compared with 50 % of British people surveyed. Both women and men over the age of 40 years had a higher alkylresorcinol intake than younger people. The average results from the two methods were similar, but the FCD data provided more detail about the range of alkylresorcinol intake, and indicate that because the intake of alkylresorcinols varies so widely, they may be good markers of diets rich or poor in whole-grain wheat/rye products.
PubMed ID
16197572 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
  1 document  
Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Higher intake of fish and fat is associated with lower plasma s-adenosylhomocysteine: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293475
Source
Nutr Res. 2017 Oct; 46:78-87
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Mads V Lind
Lotte Lauritzen
Oluf Pedersen
Henrik Vestergaard
Ken D Stark
Torben Hansen
Alastair B Ross
Mette Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: madslind@nexs.ku.dk.
Source
Nutr Res. 2017 Oct; 46:78-87
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Records
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Healthy Diet
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Principal Component Analysis
Risk
S-Adenosylhomocysteine - blood
Seafood
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
Several B-vitamins act as co-factors in one-carbon metabolism, a pathway that plays a central role in several chronic diseases. However, there is a lack of knowledge of how diet affects markers in one-carbon metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore dietary patterns and components associated with one-carbon metabolites. We hypothesized that intake of whole-grains and fish would be associated with lower Hcy, and higher SAM:SAH ratio due to their nutrient content. We assessed dietary information using a four-day dietary record in 118 men and women with features of the metabolic syndrome. In addition we assessed whole-blood fatty acid composition and plasma alkylresorcinols. Plasma s-adenosylmethionine (SAM), s-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), homocysteine (Hcy) and vitamin B12 was included as one-carbon metabolism markers. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to explore dietary patterns and multiple linear regression models to examine associations between dietary factors and one-carbon metabolites. PCA separated subjects based on prudent and unhealthy dietary patterns, but the dietary pattern score was not related to the one-carbon metabolites. Whole grain intake was found to be inversely associated to plasma Hcy (-4.7% (-9.3; 0.0), P=.05) and total grain intake tended to be positively associated with SAM and SAH (2.4% (-0.5; 5.5), P=.08; 5.8% (-0.2; 12.1), P=.06, respectively, per SD increase in cereal intake). Fish intake was inversely associated with plasma Hcy and SAH concentrations (-5.4% (-9.7; -0.8), P=.02 and -7.0% (-12.1; -1.5), P=.01, respectively) and positively associated with the SAM:SAH ratio (6.2% (1.6; 11.0), P=.008). In conclusion, intake and fish and whole-grain appear to be associated with a beneficial one-carbon metabolism profile. This indicates that dietary components could play a role in regulation of one-carbon metabolism with a potential impact on disease prevention.
PubMed ID
29129471 View in PubMed
Less detail