Skip header and navigation

Refine By

129 records – page 1 of 13.

[Nutrition support for patients-servicemen in military-medical organizations of the Ministry of Defence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270400
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2015 Oct;336(10):4-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
E Yu Strukov
K E Kuvshinov
A V Shchegolev
A E Shestopalov
V V Stets
V A Petrakov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2015 Oct;336(10):4-10
Date
Oct-2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Illness
Female
Hospitals, Military
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Support
Russia
Abstract
Analysis of the state of nutritional support in military medical institutions of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. In order to study the state of nutritional support chiefs (heads) of anaesthesiology and resuscitation military medical organizations of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation on the practice of Clinical Nutrition were interviewed. These amounts reflect the organization, strategy, equipment and the need for means and methods of nutritional support, depending on the level of the organization, as well as provide a basis for improving the practice of nutritionally metabolic support in critically ill patients.
PubMed ID
26827501 View in PubMed
Less detail

Some aspects of the structure and organization of child nutrition in a number of regions Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289845
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(6):95-102
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
T V Mazhaeva
O V Chugunova
D V Grashchenkov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(6):95-102
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Russia
Abstract
This research aims to assess catering arrangements and dietary patterns of children at preschool educational institution and at home. The article analyses catering arrange­ments for pre-school children (3-7-year-old) from Ekaterinburg, Nizhny Tagil, Kamensk-Uralsky, Vladikavkaz and Krasnoyarsk. Based on menu production records provided by preschool educational institution, and family nutrition questionnaires we have examined their compliance with the nutritional physiological standards. The summarized data on menu production records from preschool educational institutions showed whether they met food basket requirements (net weight), as well as nutritional value requirements (proteins, fats, carbohydrates, calories content). The assessment was carried out in Ekaterinburg, Nizhny Tagil and Krasnoyarsk using Public catering calculations software (version 5) and a proprietary database of childreris food formulae. Childrens food basket assess­ment in Ekaterinburg and Kamensk-Uralsky revealed underconsumptionof vegetables (17.9-38% decrease), milk (52.7-62% decrease), curd (40.2-45.3% decrease). We have also observed decreased consumption of fruits, including dried fruit, by 31.8%, as well as cereals and legumes by 43% in Kamensk-Uralsky. Macronutrient analysis has shown underconsumption of total carbohydrates (by 19%) and animal proteins. The assessment of children nutrition at home has been carried out using NUTRITEST-IP diagnostic sys­tem in Nizhny Tagil, Kamensk-Uralsky, Vladikavkaz and Krasnoyarsk. The results showed overconsumption of most foods except vegetables. Excessive intake of fats and sugars (3.6 and 3.5 fold higher, respectively) accounted for higher than normal energy consump­tion by children at home. The evaluation has also revealed a significant difference in the consumption of saturated fats, mono - and disaccharides, food fibers and vitamin C by the children from the locations included in the study. The excessive intake of simple carbohy­drates was typical for family diets and excessive fat intake was characteristic for child diet in preschool educational institution.
PubMed ID
29377657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validation of presence of supermarkets and fast-food outlets in Copenhagen: case study comparison of multiple sources of secondary data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125920
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jul;15(7):1228-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Chalida M Svastisalee
Bjørn E Holstein
Pernille Due
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, Copenhagen K, Denmark. chsv@niph.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jul;15(7):1228-31
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Fast Foods
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Restaurants
Schools
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We examined the quality of food outlet addresses provided by secondary sources and determined whether they could be physically located in the field.
Addresses of food outlets in fourteen school districts in the northern part of Copenhagen were obtained from multiple business locators. We geocoded 202 addresses using a geographic information system and cross-referenced the sources against each other using a validation grid. Physical presence was determined via street survey. We applied gamma statistics and calculated positive predictive value, sensitivity and percentage agreement to assess the overall correspondence between our test of physical presence and each source of secondary information.
The study took place within city boundaries of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Food outlets within fourteen school districts within Copenhagen.
Positive predictive value between field results and secondary sources indicated good to excellent correspondence (range: 0·81-0·98), comparable with other studies. Gamma coefficients indicated low to high positive correspondence (range: 0·23-0·98).
Despite moderately high correspondence between secondary sources of address information and field observation, the findings illustrate that the use of combined sources is recommended.
PubMed ID
22440581 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contrasting Patterns for Missing Third Molars in the United States and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285379
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Jun;75(6):1113-1117
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Caitlin B L Magraw
Lars Pallesen
Kevin L Moss
Elda L Fisher
Steven Offenbacher
Raymond P White
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Jun;75(6):1113-1117
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Molar, Third - anatomy & histology
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of third molars from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Swedish survey.
This cross-sectional study involved the comparison of the only published data on third molar prevalence. The number of visible third molars in the NHANES of 2011 through 2012 were assessed in nonclinical settings by trained, calibrated dental hygienists and reported by age decade (approximately 5,000 patients). Similar data were reported for the Swedish population with data collected in clinical settings (approximately 700 patients). The primary outcome variable was the number of third molars (0 to 4); the predictor variables were age cohorts (20 to 29 through 70 to 79 yr). Outcome data were reported with descriptive statistics.
In the youngest cohort (20 to 29 yr), having no visible third molars was more likely in the US population than in the Swedish population (47 vs 2%, respectively). By 50 to 59 years, outcomes for no third molars were similar in the United States and Sweden (53 and 57%, respectively).
The presence or absence of third molars reported from the US and Swedish populations presented contrasting patterns, particularly in the younger cohorts. More comprehensive and detailed data are required in future surveys as population studies on third molars become more important for clinicians and other stakeholders.
PubMed ID
28219629 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploring statistical approaches to diminish subjectivity of cluster analysis to derive dietary patterns: The Tomorrow Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136018
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Apr 15;173(8):956-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2011
Author
Geraldine Lo Siou
Yutaka Yasui
Ilona Csizmadi
S Elizabeth McGregor
Paula J Robson
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Research, Alberta Health Services—Cancer Care, c/o Holy Cross Site, Box ACB, 2210 2nd Street SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2S 3C3. geraldine.losiou@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Apr 15;173(8):956-67
Date
Apr-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diet
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Sex Factors
Abstract
Dietary patterns derived by cluster analysis are commonly reported with little information describing how decisions are made at each step of the analytical process. Using food frequency questionnaire data obtained in 2001-2007 on Albertan men (n = 6,445) and women (n = 10,299) aged 35-69 years, the authors explored the use of statistical approaches to diminish the subjectivity inherent in cluster analysis. Reproducibility of cluster solutions, defined as agreement between 2 cluster assignments, by 3 clustering methods (Ward's minimum variance, flexible beta, K means) was evaluated. Ratios of between- versus within-cluster variances were examined, and health-related variables across clusters in the final solution were described. K means produced cluster solutions with the highest reproducibility. For men, 4 clusters were chosen on the basis of ratios of between- versus within-cluster variances, but for women, 3 clusters were chosen on the basis of interpretability of cluster labels and descriptive statistics. In comparison with those in other clusters, men and women in the "healthy" clusters by greater proportions reported normal body mass index, smaller waist circumference, and lower energy intakes. The authors' approach appeared helpful when choosing the clustering method for both sexes and the optimal number of clusters for men, but additional analyses are required to understand why it performed differently for women.
PubMed ID
21421742 View in PubMed
Less detail

Timing of complementary feeding and associations with maternal and infant characteristics: A Norwegian cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299492
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199455
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christine Helle
Elisabet R Hillesund
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0199455
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Norwegian Health authorities recommend solid food to be introduced between child age 4-6 months, depending on both the mother´s and infant's needs. The aim of this paper is to describe timing of complementary feeding in a current sample of Norwegian mother/infant-dyads and explore potential associations between timing of introduction to solid foods and a wide range of maternal and infant characteristics known from previous literature to influence early feeding interactions. The paper is based on data from the Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health. In 2016, a total of 715 mothers completed a web-based questionnaire at child age 5.5 months. We found that 5% of the infants were introduced to solid food before 4 months of age, while 14% were not introduced to solid food at 5.5 months of age. Introduction of solid food before 4 months of age was associated with the infant not being exclusive breastfed the first month, receiving only formula milk at 3 months, the mother being younger, not married/cohabitant, smoking, less educated and having more economic difficulties. Not being introduced to solid food at 5.5 months was associated with the infant being a girl, being exclusive breastfed the first month, receiving only breastmilk at 3 months, the mother being older, married and having 3 or more children. This study shows that there are still clear socioeconomic differences regarding timing of complementary feeding in Norway. Infants of younger, less educated and smoking mothers are at higher risk of not being fed in compliance with the official infant feeding recommendations. Our findings emphasize the importance of targeting socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers for support on healthy feeding practices focusing on the infant`s needs to prevent early onset of social inequalities in health.
PubMed ID
29949644 View in PubMed
Less detail

Charitable food programs in Victoria, BC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145042
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):46-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Elietha M Bocskei
Aleck S Ostry
Author Affiliation
Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-based Program with Vancouver Island Health Authority and the Salvation Army Addictions and Rehabilitation Centre, Victoria, BC.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):46-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Charities - organization & administration
Dairy Products
Food Services - economics
Food Supply - economics
Homeless Persons
Humans
Meat
Nutrition Surveys - methods
Poverty
Abstract
Few authors have investigated the institutional character of charitable food programs and their capacity to address food security in Canada.
We surveyed food program managers at charitable agencies in Greater Victoria, British Columbia. We discuss the structure of the "system" of charitable food provision, the value of sourced food, types of services provided, clients' demographic profile, and the estimated healthfulness of meals served. We also describe the proportion of major food types purchased and donated to agencies.
Thirty-six agencies served approximately 20,000 meals a week to about 17,000 people. Food valued at $3.2 million was purchased or donated; approximately 50% was donated, mainly by corporations. The largest value of food purchased and donated was from meat and alternatives (40.9%) and nonperishable food items (16%). Dairy products made up the smallest share of donated foods.
Charitable food programs in Victoria depend on food donations. The proportion of dairy products and produce is low, which raises questions about the healthfulness of foods currently fed to homeless and poor people in the city.
PubMed ID
20205978 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of a population-level school food and nutrition policy on dietary intake and body weights of Canadian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108403
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):934-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Christina Fung
Jessie-Lee D McIsaac
Stefan Kuhle
Sara F L Kirk
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, School of Public Health, 3-50 University Terrace, 8303-112 Street, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2T4, Canada. Electronic address: Christina.Fung@ualberta.ca.
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):934-40
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Child
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Female
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
School Health Services
Abstract
The objective of this study is to assess population-level trends in children's dietary intake and weight status before and after the implementation of a provincial school nutrition policy in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada.
Self-reported dietary behavior and nutrient intake and measured body mass index were collected as part of a population-level study with grade 5 students in 2003 (n=5215) and 2011 (5508), prior to and following implementation of the policy. We applied random effects regression methods to assess the effect of the policy on dietary and health outcomes.
In 2011, students reported consuming more milk products, while there was no difference in mean consumption of vegetables and fruits in adjusted models. Adjusted regression analysis revealed a statistically significant decrease in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Despite significant temporal decreases in dietary energy intake and increases in diet quality, prevalence rates of overweight and obesity continued to increase.
This population-level intervention research suggests a positive influence of school nutrition policies on diet quality, energy intake and healthy beverage consumption, and that more action beyond schools is needed to curb the increases in the prevalence of childhood obesity.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr. 2003 Nov;133(11):3476-8414608061
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Apr;6(2):142-820874077
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2004 Aug;22(8):679-70115370482
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1995 Mar;95(3):336-407860946
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Sep 25;337(13):869-739302300
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 Nov;15(4):298-3159838974
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):432-515727972
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Aug 27;378(9793):804-1421872749
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(12):CD00187122161367
Cites: J Pediatr. 2012 Feb;160(2):216-221.e121885058
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2003 Oct 20;3:2114567763
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):212-615913088
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Sep 13;173(6):607-1316157724
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005 Dec;159(12):1111-416330732
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2006 Sep;9(6):814-2016925889
Cites: Health Rep. 2006 Aug;17(3):27-4216981484
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Jan;64(1):186-9817030372
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2007 Jul;4(3):A5617572960
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Jan;98(1):111-718048778
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Apr;121(4):e794-80218381508
Cites: J Sch Health. 2008 May;78(5):245-5118387023
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Oct;35(4):380-518687567
Cites: Healthc Pap. 2008;9(1):8-2118974661
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(6):341-718984489
Cites: J Nutr. 2009 Jan;139(1):142-419056643
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Jan;48(1):45-5319026676
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):Suppl I8-1419263977
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Apr;99(4):706-1219150914
Cites: Milbank Q. 2009 Mar;87(1):71-10019298416
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Oct 27;282(16):1523-910546691
Cites: BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-310797032
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1429-3311192647
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Mar 14;346(11):854-511893799
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):668-7312740457
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Sep;45(3 Suppl):S1-519699432
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Sep;45(3 Suppl):S30-719699434
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2009 Sep-Oct;124(5):660-919753944
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Mar;110(3):434-4020184994
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2010 Mar-Apr;29(3):436-4620194985
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(6):781-9720070915
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Apr;13(4):589-9519860991
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):40-320364537
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Aug;104(4):474-8720500928
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Oct;110(10):1501-1020869489
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2013 Jun;16(6):1082-10022850118
PubMed ID
23891787 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of dietary intake among Inuvialuit in Arctic Canada using a locally developed quantitative food frequency questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258889
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2014;33(2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Fariba Kolahdooz
Lauren Butler
Madalina Lupu
Tony Sheehy
Andre Corriveau
Sangita Sharma
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2014;33(2):147-54
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Questionnaires
Abstract
Inuvialuit in Arctic Canada are experiencing a nutritional and lifestyle transition, characterized by a declining consumption of traditional foods, increased consumption of non-nutrient-dense store-bought foods (NNDF), and reduced levels of physical activity with a concurrent rise in chronic diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine dietary intake of Inuvialuit adults in the Northwest Territories, Canada, using a culturally specific, validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ).
A cross-sectional dietary survey of 213 randomly selected adults (=19 years) was conducted in 3 remote communities in the Northwest Territories. Nonparametric analysis was used to compare mean nutrient intake, dietary inadequacy, and differences in nutrient density among men and women. Data were also analyzed to determine the top food groups contributing to energy and selected nutrients.
With response rates of 65% to 85%, 43 men (mean age 43.2 ± 12.8) and 170 women (mean age 44.7 ± 13.9) completed the QFFQ. Mean daily energy intakes for men were 3478 ± 1474 kcal and for women they were 3299 ± 1653 kcal. For both sexes, protein, carbohydrates, and fat provided approximately 16%, 47%, and 28% of energy intake, respectively. NNDFs were the top contributors to energy (39%), fat (40%), carbohydrate (54%), sugar (74%), and sodium (23%) intake. Total traditional foods from the land, sea, and sky such as polar bear and wild birds contributed 11% of energy and 41% of protein intake. Most participants' daily intakes were below recommended levels for dietary fiber; vitamins A, E, and D; potassium; and magnesium. Mean daily energy, saturated fat, and sodium intakes exceeded recommendations.
We identified nutrient inadequacies and characterized food consumption among Inuvialuit. These data support nutritional interventions that encourage consumption of traditional foods. The cultural and ethnic differences in Canadian Arctic populations require specific tailoring of public health interventions and policy using population specific tools to meet local needs.
PubMed ID
24724772 View in PubMed
Less detail

129 records – page 1 of 13.