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Nutrition and growth during infancy. The Copenhagen Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59082
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1997 May;420:1-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
K F Michaelsen
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1997 May;420:1-36
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding
Denmark
Energy intake
Female
Growth
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutrition
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
PubMed ID
9185902 View in PubMed
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Effect of prefracture versus postfracture dietary assessment on hip fracture risk estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61995
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):403-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
K. Michaelsson
L. Holmberg
S. Ljunghall
H. Mallmin
P G Persson
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, 721 89 Vasteras, Sweden. The Study Group of the Multiple Risk Survey on Swedish Women for eating Assessment (MRS SWEA).
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):403-10
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Dietary factors are presumed to have influence on bone mass and hence fracture susceptibility. Most information in this respect is based on retrospective assessment of previous dietary habits. In a population-based case-control study nested within a cohort, we collected dietary information both before and after a first hip fracture. Thus it was possible to study reported changes in dietary habits, intentional as well as unintentional, among hip fracture patients after a first hip fracture and to compare postfracture with prefracture dietary information. METHODS. More than 65 000 women born 1914-1948 in two counties in central Sweden completed a food frequency questionnaire regarding their usual current dietary habits, before attending a mammographic screening between the years 1987 and 1990. Subsequently 123 of them sustained a first hip fracture and were defined as cases in the present study. For every case, one control, individually matched by age and county of residence, was selected from the cohort. A second identical food frequency questionnaire was mailed to both cases and controls on average 2 years after the hip fracture event. In total 98 case/control pairs could be included in the analysis. The association between diet and hip fracture was evaluated and the results from the two dietary assessments were contrasted. Women who themselves claimed that they had not changed their diet in recent years were analysed separately. RESULTS. The hip fracture cases, compared with the controls, had reduced their reported dietary intake of dairy products after the fracture. Apparently this was not intentional since this effect was more pronounced among those cases who claimed that their diet was unchanged. The changes were most apparent among the younger cases with a more recent hip fracture and with a body mass index above the median. Half of the cases, more than twice the frequency in controls, who were initially classified as having high intake of dairy products were classified as having low intake (
PubMed ID
9119567 View in PubMed
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Frequency of meat and fish intake and risk of breast cancer in a prospective study of 14,500 Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25158
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Jul 15;46(1):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1990
Author
L J Vatten
K. Solvoll
E B Løken
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1990 Jul 15;46(1):12-5
Date
Jul-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Diet Surveys
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Meat
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The association between the frequency of meat and fish intake and the incidence rate of breast cancer has been analyzed in 152 incident cases that developed among 14,500 Norwegian women during 11 to 14 years of follow-up. At the time of dietary inquiry they were between 35 and 51 years of age. A positive association was observed between the frequency of overall meat intake and breast cancer risk. There was an age-adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.8 (95% confidence limits, 1.1 and 3.1) for women who had a main meal with meat 5 times or more per week compared to women who had 2 meat dinners or less per week, and this association displayed a linear trend (chi 2 trend = 4.30, p = 0.04). No association was detected between the overall frequency of fish for dinner and breast cancer risk (chi 2 trend = 1.39, p = 0.24), but there was an inverse relation with the frequency of main meals containing fish in poached form. The age-adjusted IRR was 0.7 (95% confidence limits, 0.4 and 1.0) for women who had poached fish for dinner at least 5 times per month compared to women who had fish in this form twice monthly or less often (chi 2 trend = 3.56, p = 0.06). The positive association with meat may be in accordance with the hypothesis that dietary fat increases the risk of breast cancer. Although there was no association with overall fish intake, the inverse relation with poached fish might deserve further investigation.
PubMed ID
2365494 View in PubMed
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Zinc intake, zinc status and growth in a longitudinal study of healthy Danish infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59359
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Nov;83(11):1115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
K F Michaelsen
G. Samuelson
T W Graham
B. Lönnerdal
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Nov;83(11):1115-21
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Deficiency Diseases - blood - complications - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Records
Growth Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutrition Disorders - blood - complications - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Zinc - blood - deficiency
Abstract
Mild, growth-limiting zinc deficiency might be prevalent in otherwise healthy infants according to recent studies. We examined zinc intake and status in 91 healthy term infants from birth to 12 months, as part of the Copenhagen Cohort Study on Infant Nutrition and Growth. Zinc intake was recorded monthly and the amount of zinc absorbed was estimated. These estimates were below recently published FAO/WHO/IAEA values for basal requirements in 68%, 62% and 14% of the infants at 2, 4 and 9 months of age, respectively. Serum zinc decreased significantly (p
PubMed ID
7841721 View in PubMed
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Dietary fat intake and risk of lung cancer: a prospective study of 51,452 Norwegian men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21749
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1997 Dec;6(6):540-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
M B Veierød
P. Laake
D S Thelle
Author Affiliation
Section for Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, Blindern, Norway.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1997 Dec;6(6):540-9
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - diet therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
The relationship between incidence of lung cancer and intake of dietary fats, high-fat foods, fish, and fish products was studied in 25,956 men and 25,496 women aged 16-56 years attending Norwegian health screening between 1977 and 1983. Linkage to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway ensured a complete follow-up until 31 December 1991. Diet was recorded on a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire, and 153 cases of lung cancer were identified during follow-up. Mean age at diagnosis was 56 years. After adjusting for smoking status, gender, age at screening, and attained age, significant lower risks were found for cod liver oil supplement (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-1.0) and for skim milk compared to whole milk (IRR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9)). No association was found with dietary cholesterol and saturated fat. A threshold of increased risk starting at the second quartile was seen for mono- and polyunsaturated fat. The potential protective effect of cod liver oil, a supplement rich in preformed vitamin A, omega-3 fatty acids, and monounsaturated fat, has to our knowledge, not been reported before. Confounding from lifestyle is possible, but the result deserves further investigation.
PubMed ID
9496456 View in PubMed
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Nutritional status: serum lipids. Euronut SENECA investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62180
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Dec;45 Suppl 3:53-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
A. Kafatos
J L Schlienger
J P Deslypere
A. Ferro-Luzzi
J A Cruz
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Dec;45 Suppl 3:53-61
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - blood - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Serum lipid levels are considered to be one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged men and women. The significance, however, of serum lipid metabolism as a cardiovascular disease risk factor in the elderly has yet to be clarified. This paper focuses upon the serum lipid levels of groups of elderly people from 18 centres with diversified socioeconomic backgrounds in 11 European countries. Serum cholesterol was measured with an enzymatic colorimetric method by autoanalyser in one laboratory and accuracy was checked by participation in the quality control programme of the Centre for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA, USA. Mean (+/- SD) serum cholesterol levels ranged from 6.56 +/- 0.66 mmol/l (Bellinzona, Switzerland) to 5.22 +/- 0.68 mmol/l (Coimbra, Portugal) in men, and in women from 7.77 +/- 1.61 mmol/l (Elverum, Norway) to 5.86 +/- 1.07 mmol/l (Anogia-Archanes/Greece). The mean levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ranged from 1.40 +/- 0.58 mmol/l (Chateau Renault-Amboise, France) to 1.05 +/- 0.28 mmol/l (Elverum, Norway) in men and from 1.62 +/- 0.41 mmol/l (Padua, Italy) to 1.23 +/- 0.29 mmol/l (Anogia-Archanes, Greece; Vila Franca de Xira, Portugal) in women. The highest median serum triglyceride values were found in Norway (Elverum) (men: 1.50 mmol/l, women: 1.75 mmol/l), and one of the French groups (Chateau Renault-Amboise) had the lowest median values (men: 1.07 mmol/l, women: 1.15 mmol/l). Significant differences between participating centres and between sexes were found for the following variables: serum cholesterol, HDL, and the ratio total HDL cholesterol/total cholesterol. For triglycerides the differences were significant only between centres, not between the sexes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1809570 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.