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Aboriginal health learning in the forest and cultivated gardens: building a nutritious and sustainable food system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151012
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):263-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mirella L Stroink
Connie H Nelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. mstroink@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):263-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Food Supply
Forestry
Gardening - education - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Personal Satisfaction
Seafood
Abstract
Sustainable food systems are those in which diverse foods are produced in close proximity to a market. A dynamic, adaptive knowledge base that is grounded in local culture and geography and connected to outside knowledge resources is essential for such food systems to thrive. Sustainable food systems are particularly important to remote and Aboriginal communities, where extensive transportation makes food expensive and of poorer nutritional value. The Learning Garden program was developed and run with two First Nation communities in northwestern Ontario. With this program, the team adopted a holistic and experiential model of learning to begin rebuilding a knowledge base that would support a sustainable local food system. The program involved a series of workshops held in each community and facilitated by a community-based coordinator. Topics included cultivated gardening and forest foods. Results of survey data collected from 20 Aboriginal workshop participants are presented, revealing a moderate to low level of baseline knowledge of the traditional food system, and a reliance on the mainstream food system that is supported by food values that place convenience, ease, and price above the localness or cultural connectedness of the food. Preliminary findings from qualitative data are also presented on the process of learning that occurred in the program and some of the insights we have gained that are relevant to future adaptations of this program.
PubMed ID
19437287 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire and nutrient database for Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165732
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ilona Csizmadi
Lisa Kahle
Ruth Ullman
Ursula Dawe
Thea Palmer Zimmerman
Christine M Friedenreich
Heather Bryant
Amy F Subar
Author Affiliation
Division of Population Health and Information, Alberta Cancer Board, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N2. ilona.csizmadi@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Databases, Factual
Female
Food - classification
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
Despite assumed similarities in Canadian and US dietary habits, some differences in food availability and nutrient fortification exist. Food-frequency questionnaires designed for the USA may therefore not provide the most accurate estimates of dietary intake in Canadian populations. Hence, we undertook to evaluate and modify the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and nutrient database.
Of the foods queried on the DHQ, those most likely to differ in nutrient composition were identified. Where possible these foods were matched to comparable foods in the Canadian Nutrient File. Nutrient values were examined and modified to reflect the Canadian content of minerals (calcium, iron, zinc) and vitamins (A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and B12). DHQs completed by 13 181 Alberta Cohort Study participants aged 35-69 years were analysed to estimate nutrient intakes using the original US and modified versions of the DHQ databases. Misclassification of intake for meeting the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) was determined following analysis with the US nutrient database.
Twenty-five per cent of 2411 foods deemed most likely to differ in nutrient profile were subsequently modified for folate, 11% for vitamin D, 10% for calcium and riboflavin, and between 7 and 10% for the remaining nutrients of interest. Misclassification with respect to meeting the DRI varied but was highest for folate (7%) and vitamin A (7%) among men, and for vitamin D (7%) among women over 50 years of age.
Errors in nutrient intake estimates owing to differences in food fortification between the USA and Canada can be reduced in Canadian populations by using nutrient databases that reflect Canadian fortification practices.
PubMed ID
17212847 View in PubMed
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Addressing Household Food Insecurity in Canada - Position Statement and Recommendations - Dietitians of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288319
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2016 09;77(3):159
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-2016
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2016 09;77(3):159
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Dietetics
Financing, Government
Food Supply - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Government Programs
Humans
Income
Mental health
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Status
Nutritionists
Socioeconomic Factors
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
POSITION STATEMENT It is the position of Dietitians of Canada that household food insecurity is a serious public health issue with profound effects on physical and mental health and social well-being. All households in Canada must have sufficient income for secure access to nutritious food after paying for other basic necessities. Given the alarming prevalence, severity and impact of household food insecurity in Canada, Dietitians of Canada calls for a pan-Canadian, government-led strategy to specifically reduce food insecurity at the household level, including policies that address the unique challenges of household food insecurity among Indigenous Peoples. Regular monitoring of the prevalence and severity of household food insecurity across all of Canada is required. Research must continue to address gaps in knowledge about household vulnerability to food insecurity and to evaluate the impact of policies developed to eliminate household food insecurity in Canada. Dietitians of Canada recommends: Development and implementation of a pan-Canadian government-led strategy that includes coordinated policies and programs, to ensure all households have consistent and sufficient income to be able to pay for basic needs, including food. Implementation of a federally-supported strategy to comprehensively address the additional and unique challenges related to household food insecurity among Indigenous Peoples, including assurance of food sovereignty, with access to lands and resources, for acquiring traditional/country foods, as well as improved access to more affordable and healthy store-bought/market foods in First Nation reserves and northern and remote communities. Commitment to mandatory, annual monitoring and reporting of the prevalence of marginal, moderate and severe household food insecurity in each province and territory across Canada, including among vulnerable populations, as well as regular evaluation of the impact of poverty reduction and protocols for screening within the health care system. Support for continued research to address gaps in knowledge about populations experiencing greater prevalence and severity of household food insecurity and to inform the implementation and evaluation of strategies and policies that will eliminate household food insecurity in Canada.
PubMed ID
27524631 View in PubMed
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Addressing poor nutrition to promote heart health: moving upstream.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140561
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kim D Raine
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kim.raine@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diet therapy - prevention & control
Cereals
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Evidence-Based Medicine
Fatty acids
Fishes
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Nuts
Obesity - diet therapy - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Vegetables
Abstract
Current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention suggest dietary patterns that promote achieving healthy weight, emphasize vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, fish and nuts, substituting mono-unsaturated fats for saturated fats and restricting dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg/day. However, trends in nutrient intake and food consumption patterns suggest that the need for improvement in the dietary patterns of Canadians is clear. Influencing eating behaviour requires more than addressing nutrition knowledge and perceptions of healthy eating - it requires tackling the context within which individuals make choices. A comprehensive approach to improving nutrition includes traditional downstream strategies such as counselling to improve knowledge and skills; midstream strategies such as using the media to change social norms; and upstream strategies such as creating supportive environments through public policy including regulatory measures. While the evidence base for more upstream strategies continues to grow, key examples of comprehensive approaches to population change provide a call to action.
Notes
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Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Apr 13;169(7):659-6919364995
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Cites: Health Psychol. 2000 Jan;19(1 Suppl):76-8310709951
Cites: Obes Rev. 2005 Feb;6(1):23-3315655036
PubMed ID
20847988 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161617
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Elaheh Aghdassi
Barbara E Wendland
Melanie Stapleton
Maitreyi Raman
Johane P Allard
Author Affiliation
The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Crohn Disease - diet therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of
PubMed ID
17761234 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143615
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel Monárrez-Espino
Graciela Ivette Béjar-Lío
Guillermo Vázquez-Mendoza
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Chihuahua, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Menu Planning
Mexico
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Residential Facilities
Schools
Abstract
To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools.
Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7.
The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg.
There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.
PubMed ID
20464250 View in PubMed
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Adequate iodine nutrition in Sweden: a cross-sectional national study of urinary iodine concentration in school-age children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92106
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jul;63(7):828-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Andersson M.
Berg G.
Eggertsen R.
Filipsson H.
Gramatkovski E.
Hansson M.
Hulthén L.
Milakovic M.
Nyström E.
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Human Nutrition, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, Zürich CH-8092, Switzerland. maria.andersson@ilw.agrl.ethz.ch
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jul;63(7):828-34
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Goiter, Endemic - prevention & control
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - urine
Male
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Status
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Sweden has a long-standing salt iodization program; however, its effects on iodine intake have never been monitored on a national level. The objective of this study was to evaluate iodine nutrition in the Swedish population by measuring the urinary iodine concentration (UIC) in a national sample of Swedish school-age (6-12 years of age) children. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A stratified probability proportionate to size cluster sampling method was used to obtain a representative national sample of school-age children from 30 clusters. Spot urine samples were collected for UIC analysis using a modified Sandell-Kolthoff method. RESULTS: The median UIC of the children (n=857) was 125 microg/l (range 11-757 microg/l). The proportion of children with a UIC 300 microg/l was 5.5 and 3.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The iodine nutritional status of the Swedish population is adequate. Iodized table salt remains the main dietary source of iodine in Swedish diet. Recommendations to reduce total salt intake in the population urge increased use of iodized salt in the production of processed foods. Pregnant and lactating women with high iodine requirements may still be at risk for low iodine intake. This study will serve as the basis for future monitoring of iodine nutritional status in Sweden.
PubMed ID
18781164 View in PubMed
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Adherence of pregnant women to Nordic dietary guidelines in relation to postpartum weight retention: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256846
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne von Ruesten
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Kirsten Mehlig
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is a major life event for women and often connected with changes in diet and lifestyle and natural gestational weight gain. However, excessive weight gain during pregnancy may lead to postpartum weight retention and add to the burden of increasing obesity prevalence. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether adherence to nutrient recommendations or food-based guidelines is associated with postpartum weight retention 6 months after birth.
This analysis is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Diet during the first 4-5 months of pregnancy was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and maternal weight before pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period was assessed by questionnaires. Two Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores were applied to measure compliance with either the official Norwegian food-based guidelines (HEI-NFG) or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (HEI-NNR) during pregnancy. The considered outcome, i.e. weight retention 6 months after birth, was modelled in two ways: continuously (in kg) and categorically (risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, i.e. =?5% gain to pre-pregnancy weight). Associations between the HEI-NFG and HEI-NNR score with postpartum weight retention on the continuous scale were estimated by linear regression models. Relationships of both HEI scores with the categorical outcome variable were evaluated using logistic regression.
In the continuous model without adjustment for gestational weight gain (GWG), the HEI-NFG score but not the HEI-NNR score was inversely related to postpartum weight retention. However, after additional adjustment for GWG as potential intermediate the HEI-NFG score was marginally inversely and the HEI-NNR score was inversely associated with postpartum weight retention. In the categorical model, both HEI scores were inversely related with risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, independent of adjustment for GWG.
Higher adherence to either the official Norwegian food guidelines or possibly also to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations during pregnancy appears to be associated with lower postpartum weight retention.
Notes
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:i-xii, 1-25311234459
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PubMed ID
24456804 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national food-based dietary guidelines and incidence of stroke: A cohort study of Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299135
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Sine Hammer Hansen
Kim Overvad
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206242
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
National dietary guidelines are intended to promote primary prevention of lifestyle-related diseases, but little is known about their effectiveness in prevention of stroke.
We used the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health (n = 57 053) to investigate whether adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines was associated with risk of stroke. Adherence was assessed by the Danish Dietary Guidelines Index, score 0 [no adherence] to 6 [complete adherence]. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for stroke and subtypes of stroke in men and women separately.
Incident stroke was determined in 1357 men and 900 women during follow-up (median 12.5 years and 13.0 years, respectively). A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was inversely associated with total stroke in men but not in women. In men, a high Index score (=4) was also inversely associated with total ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.86), large-artery atherosclerosis (hazard ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.44-0.92) and small artery occlusion (hazard ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.84) compared to a low Index score (
PubMed ID
30356304 View in PubMed
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Adherence to special diets and its association with meeting the nutrient recommendations in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294978
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
A J Ahola
C Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Biomedicum Helsinki C318b, PO Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet, Diabetic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Not much is known about adherence to special diets in type 1 diabetes, characteristics of individuals with special diets, and whether such practices should raise concerns with respect to meeting the dietary recommendations. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of adherence to special diets, in a population of individuals with type 1 diabetes, and investigated the association between special diet adherence and dietary intake, measured as dietary patterns and nutrient intakes.
During the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study visit, participants with type 1 diabetes (n?=?1429) were instructed to complete a diet questionnaire inquiring about the adherence to special diets. The participants also completed a food record, from which energy and nutrient intakes were calculated.
In all, 36.6% participants reported adhering to some special diet. Most commonly reported special diets were lactose-free (17.1%), protein restriction (10.0%), vegetarian (7.0%), and gluten-free (5.6%) diet. Special diet adherents were more frequently women, older, had longer diabetes duration, and more frequently had various diabetes complications. Mean carbohydrate intakes were close to the lower levels of the recommendation in all diet groups, which was reflected in low mean fibre intakes but high frequencies of meeting the sucrose recommendations. The recommendation for saturated fatty acid intake was frequently unmet, with the highest frequencies observed in vegetarians. Of the micronutrients, vitamin D, folate, and iron recommendations were most frequently unmet, with some differences between the diet groups.
Special diets are frequently followed by individuals with type 1 diabetes. The adherents are more frequently women, and have longer diabetes duration and more diabetes complications. Achieving the dietary recommendations differed between diets, and depended on the nutrient in question. Overall, intakes of fibre, vitamin D, folate, and iron fell short of the recommendations.
PubMed ID
29777369 View in PubMed
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483 records – page 1 of 49.