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Attitudes of nursing staff towards nutritional nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61604
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):223-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Lennart Christensson
Mitra Unosson
Margareta Bachrach-Lindström
Anna-Christina Ek
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. lennart.christensson@educ.ltjkpg.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):223-31
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Dementia - complications - nursing
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Homes
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Disorders - etiology - nursing
Nutritional Support - nursing
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Abstract
Fulfilling nutritional requirements in residents with eating problems can be a challenge for both the person in need of help and for the caregiver. In helping and supporting these residents, a positive attitude is assumed to be as important as practical skill. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nutritional education and implementation of a nutritional programme would change the attitudes towards nutritional nursing care among nursing staff with daily experience of serving food and helping residents in municipal care. The study was carried out as a before and after experimental design. An attitude scale, staff attitudes to nutritional nursing care (SANN scale), was developed and used. The response on the scale gives a total SANN-score and scores in five underlying dimensions: self ability, individualization, importance of food, assessment and secured food intake. Nursing staff at eight different residential units (n = 176) responded to the attitude scale and, of these, staff at three of the units entered the study as the experimental group. After responding to the attitude scale, nutritional education was introduced and a nutritional programme was implemented in the experimental units. One year later, attitudes were measured a second time (n = 192). Of these, 151 had also responded on the first occasion. Education and implementation of a nutritional programme did not significantly change attitudes. Overall, nursing staff responded with positive attitudes towards nutritional nursing care. Most of the positive attitudes concerned items within the dimension importance of food. In contrast, items within self ability showed the lowest number of staff with positive attitudes.
PubMed ID
12919456 View in PubMed
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Case study of a healthy eating intervention for Swedish lorry drivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61554
Source
Health Educ Res. 2004 Jun;19(3):306-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Peter E Gill
Katarina Wijk
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for Health Education Intervention, University of Gävle, 80176 Gävle, Sweden. Peter.Gill@hig.se
Source
Health Educ Res. 2004 Jun;19(3):306-15
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet
Food Preferences
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Nutrition - education
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Workplace
Abstract
Professional drivers, i.e. lorry, truck, bus and taxi drivers, have been identified as a particular health risk group. An intervention to study the efficacy of a series of educational programmes, involving improved nutritional balance in meals served, food preparation routines and carrying out personal health profiles on staff, was implemented at a Swedish truck stop in order to target this specific hard-to-reach risk group. Professional drivers were targeted through an information campaign, healthier 'Today's Special' choices and by using staff as proxy health promoters. A campaign emblem on the menu notice board indicated healthier food choice menu items. Drivers choosing healthier alternatives were given lottery tokens. The intervention was evaluated through nutritional analyses, field observations, questionnaires and interviews. Positive staff-level outcomes included increased nutritional awareness, personal health empowerment and, most crucially, overwhelming staff support for a health-promoting role. Nutritional analysis of pre- and post-intervention 'Today's Specials' showed a better balance of fat, calories, carbohydrates and protein (per 100 g) content in the dishes tested. At management level there were economic benefits in terms of time savings and reduced use of cooking fat in food preparation. Drivers tended to choose healthier alternatives and there was increased awareness of the healthier alternatives on offer. The case study showed that using truck stop staff as proxy health promoters offers a viable intervention strategy.
PubMed ID
15140850 View in PubMed
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Community teamwork in nutrition education: an example in Canada's North.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2260
Source
Human Nutrition: Applied Nutrition. 1983 Jun; 37A(3):172-179.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
Schurman, M.
Author Affiliation
Hudsons' Bay Company
Source
Human Nutrition: Applied Nutrition. 1983 Jun; 37A(3):172-179.
Date
1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Inuvik
Baker Lake
Pond Inlet
Pangnirtung
Sugluk
Frobisher Bay
Diet, western
Health services
Health education
Canada
Consumer Participation
Humans
Indians, North American
Nutrition - education
Abstract
The nutrition education program, sponsored by the Hudson's Bay Company, in remote northern communities, both Inuit and Indian, is described. The program identifies nutritious foods in the company's community stores by coding in the colours associated with the food groups of Canada's Food Guide. It involves the cooperation of key individuals from the community and various community agencies and organizations.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1217.
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Comparison of international food guide pictorial representations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61684
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Apr;102(4):483-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002

Consulting on feeding and sleeping problems in child health care: what is at the bottom of advice to parents?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29659
Source
J Child Health Care. 2005 Jun;9(2):137-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Eva-Lotta Funkquist
Marianne Carlsson
Kerstin Hedberg Nyqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Eva-Lotta.Funkquist@kbh.uu.se
Source
J Child Health Care. 2005 Jun;9(2):137-52
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Advocacy
Child Nutrition - education
Child, Preschool
Conflict (Psychology)
Counseling - standards
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Pediatric Nursing - methods
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Punishment - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders - prevention & control
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate and interpret ideas inherent in sleep and diet consultations concerning infants in Swedish child health services. Data were obtained through semi-structured interviews of professionals employed in these services. A qualitative method with a phenomenological approach was applied to analyse the data. The results indicate that professionals have underlying conceptions. They considered that when parents force food on their child, this is a violation of the child's integrity. This view is based on the idea that such actions restrict the child's right to self-determination. In the participants' opinions, when the child is forced to sleep well, this is not regarded as a violation of the child's integrity, but is perceived as support of the child's autonomy. An underlying theoretical view may be that parents' time can be saved if the child becomes independent of the parents at as early an age as possible.
PubMed ID
15961368 View in PubMed
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Cultural and social acceptability of a healthy diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54991
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
L. Holm
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects - economics - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Life Style
Male
Nutrition - education
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Satiation
Social Values
Abstract
The extent to which the dietary practices recommended by nutrition science are compatible with an enjoyable lifestyle is a recurring theme in the debate on food and health in Denmark. The aim of this study was to see in practice what problems arise when ordinary people are confronted with a healthy diet. Fourteen of the participants in an 8 month dietary intervention study were interviewed about their opinions of, and experiences with, a diet composed in accordance with the Nordic nutrition recommendations. The interviews were qualitative, in depth and semistructured. The participants were interviewed twice, the first time towards the end of the intervention and again 3 months after the intervention ended. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. For the participants, who were young students with a relatively high knowledge of nutrition, practical experience of a recommended diet was a series of surprises: the amount of food, its similarity to modern Danish food culture, its palatability, and the relatively small amount of dairy products in the diet were contrary to participants expectations. Participants found the recommended diet pleasant to live on, but expected certain economical and practical difficulties in applying it to everyday life outside the intervention. Hunger and satiety sensations changed and became more distinct. The results of the study indicate suggestions relevant for both industrial product development and nutrition information to the public.
PubMed ID
8404795 View in PubMed
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[Diagnostic test in clinical nutrition for medical students. Test results show that training in clinical nutrition must be improved]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61746
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 May 23;98(21):2604-6, 2609-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2001
Author
G. Akner
I. Bosaeus
E. Forsum
P. Thesleff
Author Affiliation
Klinisk nutrition i Stockholm, Nationella koordinatorkommittén inom Svensk förening för klinisk nutrition (SFKN), Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm. gunnar.akner@chello.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 May 23;98(21):2604-6, 2609-10
Date
May-23-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Curriculum
Education, Medical - standards
Educational Measurement
English Abstract
Humans
Nutrition - education
Sweden
Abstract
A national core curriculum in clinical nutrition was approved by the Section for Nutrition in the Swedish Society of Medicine in 1995. Here we report on the results of an anonymous diagnostic test based on this core curriculum in clinical nutrition, administered to medical students at the end of medical school. The test was the same for students in Linköping, Lund and Stockholm. Only 42% of the participants obtained an acceptable test result, with the score in Lund being significantly lower than those in Linköping and Stockholm. We compare the results with a similar test administered in Stockholm in 1996, and discuss current developmental work in clinical nutrition being done in all the medical faculties in Sweden.
PubMed ID
11440010 View in PubMed
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[Diet and exercise--health education project of the 19th class]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38571
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Jan 13;88(2):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-1988

Dietary interventions in Finland, Norway and Sweden: nutrition policies and strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61687
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2002 Apr;15(2):99-110
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
G. Roos
M. Lean
A. Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2002 Apr;15(2):99-110
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Food Labeling
Guidelines
Health Plan Implementation - trends
Health planning - trends
Humans
Norway
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Policy
Organizational Objectives
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To describe the organization and implementation of nutrition policies, and examine intervention strategies for dietary change in three Scandinavian countries. METHODS: Descriptions of nutrition policies and dietary intervention strategies are based on published nutrition policy research and reports. RESULTS: All countries studied have adopted formal nutrition policies. Norway issued its first white paper in 1976, the Finnish National Nutrition Council published an action plan in 1989, and the Swedish Government issued an official action plan in 1995. Norway has a centralized National Nutrition Council with a permanent administration whereas the responsibilities and administration are more spread out between several authorities and groups in Finland and Sweden. Amongst the dietary intervention strategies employed, a Norwegian nutrition campaign, symbol labelling of foods in Sweden, the community-based North Karelia Project in Finland, and mass catering in Finland and Sweden have been selected as potentially transferable. CONCLUSIONS: Policy documents serve as guidelines for activities and assist in achieving dietary targets. A responsible administrative body with advice from a standing expert committee is valuable for implementation. Guidelines, recommendations or voluntary labelling standards can be incentives to product development and changes to food production. Regional demonstration projects may also encourage action and collaboration.
PubMed ID
11972739 View in PubMed
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Dietary knowledge and behaviour among schoolchildren in Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36239
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
M. Osler
E T Hansen
Author Affiliation
Regional Office of Health for the Copenhagen County, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):135-40
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population
Abstract
In 1989, 674 schoolchildren aged 12-14 years in nine elementary schools in a municipality in Copenhagen, Denmark, answered a questionnaire about their dietary habits and knowledge. The majority of the pupils had fruit (87%), vegetables (72%), rye bread (81%), and drank fat-reduced milk (73%) every day. A diet score (reliability = 0.58) was calculated on the basis of the intake of 8 food items relevant to current dietary recommendations. There were no age and sex differences as to dietary habits, but immigrant children had a lower diet score than native children. Dietary knowledge was measured by the ability to state correctly whether 11 different food items had a high content or not of fat, sugar or dietary fibres. Dietary knowledge was highest for questions about fat and sugar. A knowledge score measured the number of correct answers to all 33 questions (reliability = 0.90). Knowledge was highest among older children, native children, and children with the most healthy dietary habits. In the multivariate regression analysis, knowledge, health attitudes and ethnicity were the only significant predictors of dietary behaviour. It is concluded that both social and personal factors are important for dietary behaviour, and health promotion in children should include other methods than educational programmes.
PubMed ID
8367681 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.