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121 records – page 1 of 13.

Advancing population-based health-promotion and prevention practice in community-health nursing: key conditions for change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129809
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2011 Oct-Dec;34(4):E1-E12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nicole Beaudet
Lucie Richard
Sylvie Gendron
Nancy Boisvert
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal Public Health Research Institute, Quebec, Canada. nbeaudet@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2011 Oct-Dec;34(4):E1-E12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Nursing Care - standards
Nursing Staff - organization & administration
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Quebec
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Community-health nursing practice is a pivotal aspect of present-day health reforms. In Quebec, Canada, the recent introduction of a population-based approach has entailed increasing the resources allocated to health promotion and disease prevention. Semistructured interviews were conducted with nurses and managers (N = 69) in an effort to understand how these new resources are reflected in nursing practice. Three classes of factors emerged as key conditions for change: contextual and historical, training and professional-development, and work-organization factors. The authors propose courses of action respecting these conditions to provide support for community-health nursing practices that incorporate a contemporary population-based approach.
PubMed ID
22067234 View in PubMed
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Assessing the congruence of nursing models with organizational culture: a quality improvement perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213601
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 1996 Jan;10(2):41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
D. Goodridge
B. Hack
Author Affiliation
Riverview Health Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 1996 Jan;10(2):41-8
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Models, Nursing
Nursing Homes - organization & administration - standards
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - standards
Organizational Culture
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Model-based practice was identified by the Nursing Department at Riverview Health Centre, a 320-bed long-term care facility located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, as having the potential to enhance care quality significantly. To achieve real impact in the clinical setting, however, the model selected would need to reflect closely the culture and values of the department. It was decided to explore these phenomena using cross-method triangulation involving a cultural assessment survey (the Nursing Unit Cultural Assessment Tool) and focus groups. Patient comfort and empathy emerged consistently as core values for staff. Greater appreciation of the depth and complexity of the nursing department culture and values has provided invaluable direction vis-à-vis conceptual model selection.
PubMed ID
8562988 View in PubMed
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The Autonomous-collaborative Care Model: meeting the future head on.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156824
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(2):63-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Chantale Marie LeClerc
Julie Doyon
Debbie Gravelle
Bonnie Hall
Josette Roussel
Author Affiliation
SCO Health Service, Planning, Integration and Community Engagement, Champlain Local Health Integration Network. Ottawa, ON. chantale.leclerc@lhins.on.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(2):63-75
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Leadership
Models, Nursing
Nurse Administrators
Nurse's Role
Nursing Care - organization & administration
Nursing Staff - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Professional Practice
Abstract
As care needs continue to increase in complexity in inpatient settings, and nurses' scope of practice evolves to keep pace with these changing demands, it is imperative that nurse leaders ensure nursing care delivery models are well aligned to current realities. Older, traditional models of nursing service may no longer foster safe, effective and efficient care or contribute to job satisfaction and high-quality work life for nurses. This paper describes the Autonomous-Collaborative Care Model and its application in a continuing care setting. This innovative and flexible model fosters autonomy and accountability in nursing practice, reduces duplication in the execution of nursing tasks, enhances effective communication and outlines mechanisms for collaboration among various members of the nursing and interprofessional teams. The model has positioned the authors' organization to meet impending shortages of nursing personnel by ensuring that the right category of nurse is assigned to the appropriate patient, by reducing non-nursing work and by supporting nurses' autonomy to practise to their full scope.
PubMed ID
18536546 View in PubMed
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British Columbia's provincial nursing workload project: evidence to empowerment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144303
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Mar;23(1):54-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Maura MacPhee
Karen Jewell
Andrea Wardrop
Ashifa Ahmed
Barbara Mildon
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia School of Nursing, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC. Maura.macphee@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Mar;23(1):54-63
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Community-Based Participatory Research
Decision Making, Organizational
Humans
Leadership
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This case study describes an ongoing demonstration project that engages nurses and nurse leaders in decision-making with respect to workload management issues at eight practice sites within British Columbia (two per healthcare sector: acute care, long-term care, community health and community mental health). The primary goal of this project is to promote high-quality practice environments by empowering front-line nurses and their leaders: giving them the means to systematically examine and act upon factors that influence their workloads. Examples from practice sites illustrate tangible benefits from the project.
PubMed ID
20383080 View in PubMed
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121 records – page 1 of 13.