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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and socialization: voices of internationally educated nurses in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77756
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Sochan A.
Singh M D
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, York, Canada. asochan@yorku.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
China - ethnology
Communication
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Philippines - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Socialization
Ukraine - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper describes a study that explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in their efforts to gain entry to practice as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. AIM: The aim was to uncover, in part, the issues related to professional nursing credentialling. METHODS: This study was guided by a biographical narrative (qualitative) research methodology. A convenience sample of 12 IEN students volunteered for this study representing the Philippines, Mainland China, Korea, Ukraine and India. FINDINGS: The findings were that the IENs progress through a three-phase journey in their quest for licensure in Ontario. These phases include: (1) hope - wanting the Canadian dream of becoming an RN in Ontario; (2) disillusionment - discovering that their home-country nursing qualifications do not meet Ontario RN entry to practice; and (3) navigating disillusionment - living the redefined Canadian dream by returning to nursing school to upgrade their nursing qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: Professional regulatory nursing bodies and nursing educators, as well as practising nurses, must be aware of the potentially confusing and unpleasant processes IENs go through as they qualify for the privilege of practising nursing in Ontario.
PubMed ID
17492985 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71494
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Ehrenberg
M. Ehnfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. aeh@du.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Education, Nursing, Continuing - standards
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inservice Training - standards
Male
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Homes
Nursing Process - standards
Nursing Records - standards
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions. Data from patient records will increasingly be used for care planning, quality assessment, research, health planning and allocation of resources. Knowledge about the accuracy of such secondary data, however, is limited and only a few studies have been conducted on the accuracy of nursing recording. The aim of this study was to analyse the concordance between the nursing documentation in nursing homes and descriptions of some specific problems of nurses and patients. Comparisons were made between wards where nurses had received training in structured recording based on the nursing process (study group) and wards where no intervention had taken place (reference group). Data were collected from the patient records of randomly selected nursing home residents (n=85). The methods used were audits of patient records and structured interviews with residents and nurses. The study revealed considerable deficiencies in the accuracy of the patient records when the records were compared with the reports from nurses and residents. The overall agreement between the interview data from nurses and from the patient records was low. Concordance was better in the study group as compared with the reference group in which the recorded data were structured only following chronological order. The study unequivocally demonstrates that there are major limitations in using records as a data source for the evaluation, planning and development of care.
PubMed ID
12453171 View in PubMed
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Applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification to describe nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174926
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):128-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Asta Thoroddsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. astat@hi.is
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):128-39
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Iceland
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Informatics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Process - classification
Nursing Records
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Semantics
Sensitivity and specificity
Terminology as Topic
Translating
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
The aim of this survey was to test the applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system for use in a future nursing information system for documenting nursing in an electronic patient record in Iceland. Also, the aim was to test the translation of NIC into Icelandic. In order to be applicable to nursing NIC needs to be sensitive enough to describe the work nurses do, differentiate between specialities in nursing, and be understandable to nurses. A sample of 198 nurses was asked to identify how often they used each of 433 NIC nursing interventions. Of the 36 most frequently used interventions half are within the physiological domain. Core nursing interventions were different between specialities, e.g. Analgesic Administration had a high mean score in surgical nursing, and Health Education in primary health care. anova for the 27 classes in NIC showed significant differences (p
PubMed ID
15877638 View in PubMed
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Application of the development stages of a cluster randomized trial to a framework for valuating complex health interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189408
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2002 Jul 11;2(1):13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-2002
Author
Mark B Loeb
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. loebm@mcmaster.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2002 Jul 11;2(1):13
Date
Jul-11-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cluster analysis
Critical Pathways
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Nursing Homes - standards - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Staff - education
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - nursing - urine
Abstract
Trials of complex health interventions often pose difficult methodologic challenges. The objective of this paper is to assess the extent to which the various development steps of a cluster randomized trial to optimize antibiotic use in nursing homes are represented in a recently published framework for the design and evaluation of complex health interventions. In so doing, the utility of the framework for health services researchers is evaluated.
Using the five phases of the framework (theoretical, identification of components of the intervention, definition of trial and intervention design, methodological issues for main trial, promoting effective implementation), corresponding stages in the development of the cluster randomized trial using diagnostic and treatment algorithms to optimize the use of antibiotics in nursing homes are identified and described.
Synthesis of evidence needed to construct the algorithms, survey and qualitative research used to define components of the algorithms, a pilot study to assess the feasibility of delivering the algorithms, methodological issues in the main trial including choice of design, allocation concealment, outcomes, sample size calculation, and analysis are adequately represented using the stages of the framework.
The framework is a useful resource for researchers planning a randomized clinical trial of a complex intervention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12110157 View in PubMed
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277 records – page 1 of 28.