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91 records – page 1 of 10.

Best laid plans: examining contradictions between intent and outcome in a feminist, collaborative research project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196157
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Nov;10(6):717-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
D L Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education, Institute for Women's Studies and Gender Studies, University of Toronto.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Nov;10(6):717-33
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Feminism
Focus Groups
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Personnel Downsizing
Research Design
United States
Abstract
This article critically examines a feminist, collaborative research method that was intended to be political in standpoint, gendered in focus, reflexive in process, and transformative in outcome. By incorporating collaborative elements into a qualitative, three-step research design, the author hoped to challenge both what was known about nurses' job displacement and how that knowledge was produced. This article explores the contradictions between the author's best laid plans and the actual process of discovery. Recommendations for future research include considerations about the social and political context in which the research takes place, cautions about gender inclusivity in the research population and analytic frameworks, strategies for encouraging participants' critical thinking, and a caveat with regard to transformative outcomes.
PubMed ID
11146855 View in PubMed
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Beyond demographic change in human resources planning: an extended framework and application to nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183009
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2003 Oct;8(4):225-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Stephen Birch
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Chris Alksnis
Gail Tomblin Murphy
Donna Thomson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada.
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2003 Oct;8(4):225-9
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Efficiency, Organizational
Episode of Care
Health Manpower
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Hospital Bed Capacity
Hospital Planning
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Ontario - epidemiology
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - utilization
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Regional Health Planning
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To introduce health care production functions into human resources planning and to apply the approach to analysing the need for registered nurses in Ontario during a period of major reduction in inpatient capacity.
Measurement of changes in services delivered by acute care hospitals in Ontario between 1994/95 and 1998/99, and comparison with changes in the mix of human resources, non-human resources and patient needs.
Inpatient episodes per nurse fell by almost 2%. At the same time the number of beds was cut by over 20%. As a result, the number of patients per bed increased by 12%. Allowing for severity, there was a 20% reduction in beds per episode and a 3.7% reduction in nurses per episode.
The demands on nurses in acute care hospitals have increased as an increasing number of severity-adjusted episodes are served using fewer beds by a reduced number of nurses. Human resources planning traditionally only considers the effects of demographic change on the need for and supply of health care. Failure to recognize the variable and endogenous nature of other health care inputs leads to false impressions about the adequacy of existing supplies of human resources. Consideration of human resources in the context of the production function for health services provides a meaningful way of improving the effectiveness and efficiency of human resources planning.
PubMed ID
14596757 View in PubMed
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British Columbia: improving retention and recruitment in smaller communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126351
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:37-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Marion Healey-Ogden
Patricia Wejr
Catherine Farrow
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:37-44
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Career Mobility
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Job Satisfaction
National health programs - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover
Pilot Projects
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Abstract
This pilot project involved the application, in Canada, of the innovative 80/20 staffing model to a hospital in a small rural setting. The model provides the voluntary participants with 20% of their salaried time off from direct patient care in order to pursue various types of professional development activities. The project, overseen by a steering committee, lasted from June 2009 to February 2010 and involved 14 nurses on the pediatric unit of Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops, British Columbia. It entailed a collaborative partnership of the British Columbia Nurses' Union, Interior Health Authority, Thompson Rivers University and the British Columbia Ministry of Health, and aimed to demonstrate how professional development opportunities can improve recruitment and retention of nurses, quality of work life and quality of patient care.
PubMed ID
22398476 View in PubMed
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[Changed working times require courage and new thinking].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226336
Source
Vardfacket. 1991 May 24;15(10):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-1991

[Community Hospital: current occupational developments requires more nurses. Interview by Lars Peter Bergqvist].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234963
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1987 Jul 15;87(29):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1987

[Conversions on the wrong basis: Aker Hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227987
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Nov 22;78(20):16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-1990

Correlates and predictors of missed nursing care in hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286623
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Jun;26(11-12):1524-1534
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Helga Bragadóttir
Beatrice J Kalisch
Gudný Bergthora Tryggvadóttir
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Jun;26(11-12):1524-1534
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Critical Care Nursing - manpower
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Care - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Quality of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To identify the contribution of hospital, unit, staff characteristics, staffing adequacy and teamwork to missed nursing care in Iceland hospitals.
A recently identified quality indicator for nursing care and patient safety is missed nursing care defined as any standard, required nursing care omitted or significantly delayed, indicating an error of omission. Former studies point to contributing factors to missed nursing care regarding hospital, unit and staff characteristics, perceptions of staffing adequacy as well as nursing teamwork, displayed in the Missed Nursing Care Model.
This was a quantitative cross-sectional survey study.
The samples were all registered nurses and practical nurses (n = 864) working on 27 medical, surgical and intensive care inpatient units in eight hospitals throughout Iceland. Response rate was 69·3%. Data were collected in March-April 2012 using the combined MISSCARE Survey-Icelandic and the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic. Descriptive, correlational and regression statistics were used for data analysis.
Missed nursing care was significantly related to hospital and unit type, participants' age and role and their perception of adequate staffing and level of teamwork. The multiple regression testing of Model 1 indicated unit type, role, age and staffing adequacy to predict 16% of the variance in missed nursing care. Controlling for unit type, role, age and perceptions of staffing adequacy, the multiple regression testing of Model 2 showed that nursing teamwork predicted an additional 14% of the variance in missed nursing care.
The results shed light on the correlates and predictors of missed nursing care in hospitals. This study gives direction as to the development of strategies for decreasing missed nursing care, including ensuring appropriate staffing levels and enhanced teamwork.
By identifying contributing factors to missed nursing care, appropriate interventions can be developed and tested.
PubMed ID
27325454 View in PubMed
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[County Council promised serious investigation--doubtful it will provide any results. Interview by Jan Thomasson].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237167
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Apr 10;10(7):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1986

91 records – page 1 of 10.