Skip header and navigation

Refine By

406 records – page 1 of 41.

Absenteeism among hospital nurses: an idiographic-longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230791
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
R D Hackett
P. Bycio
R M Guion
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Attitude of Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
United States
Abstract
For several months, nurses completed ratings of the degree to which certain events relevant to absence were present during each of their scheduled workdays. The event ratings for days when the nurses decided to be absent were then compared with those for days when the nurses attended. As expected, certain events, such as ill health and tiredness, tended to covary and proved to be consistently related to absenteeism across nurses. Also as expected, some events that were not especially relevant for the nurses as a whole, like having a sick family member or friend and concerns about previous poor attendance, nonetheless emerged as being relevant to the absence behavior of certain individuals. Finally, some events were consistently related to the nurses' expressed desire to be absent but not to actual absences. We discuss these differences from two perspectives, one emphasizing the role of attribution bias and the other, a two-stage process in which such bias has no major role.
PubMed ID
10293533 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A M Malek
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Alberta
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Motivation
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Seasons
Stress, Physiological
PubMed ID
3342947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of RNFA by surgeons and staff overwhelming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203416
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
S. Carver
K. Allen
Author Affiliation
Brantford General Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Operating Room Nursing - trends
Physician-Nurse Relations
PubMed ID
9883118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acoustics and psychosocial environment in intensive coronary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70774
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
V. Blomkvist
C A Eriksen
T. Theorell
R. Ulrich
G. Rasmanis
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. vanja.blomkvist@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Principal Component Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Speech Intelligibility
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Stress, strain, and fatigue at the workplace have previously not been studied in relation to acoustic conditions. AIMS: To examine the influence of different acoustic conditions on the work environment and the staff in a coronary critical care unit (CCU). METHOD: Psychosocial work environment data from start and end of each individual shift were obtained from three shifts (morning, afternoon, and night) for a one-week baseline period and for two four-week periods during which either sound reflecting or sound absorbing tiles were installed. RESULTS: Reverberation times and speech intelligibility improved during the study period when the ceiling tiles were changed from sound reflecting tiles to sound absorbing ones of identical appearance. Improved acoustics positively affected the work environment; the afternoon shift staff experienced significantly lower work demands and reported less pressure and strain. CONCLUSIONS: Important gains in the psychosocial work environment of healthcare can be achieved by improving room acoustics. The study points to the importance of further research on possible effects of acoustics in healthcare on staff turnover, quality of patient care, and medical errors.
PubMed ID
15723873 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents with anorexia nervosa: multiple perspectives of discharge readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173064
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri L Turrell
Ron Davis
Heather Graham
Iris Weiss
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sturrell@nygh.on.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Aftercare
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
Little is known about the conditions that must be in place to help adolescent patients and their families gain the confidence needed to continue recovery at home, following the adolescents' hospitalization for anorexia nervosa.
Beliefs about discharge readiness were obtained through an open-ended questionnaire following the patients' first weekend pass home from an in-patient unit. The perceptions of patients, parents, and registered nurses were obtained using parallel versions of a questionnaire.
An examination of the responses revealed four themes; medical stability, education, psychological changes, and community resource planning, that were common to all respondents, as well as themes specific to adolescents and to nurses.
The findings suggest that each group of respondents has unique discharge readiness needs and that registered nurses have an important role to play in helping patients and families make the transition home as successful as possible. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.
PubMed ID
16137269 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting information technology in hospitals: the relationship between attitudes/expectations and behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217142
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M. Hebert
I. Benbasat
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude to Computers
Communication
Diffusion of Innovation
Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design
Technology Transfer
Abstract
The purpose of this field study was to measure the influence of three factors on the adoption of information technology in a health care setting--namely, attitudes toward using the technology, subjective norms or beliefs about others' expectations, and perceived voluntariness. Approximately 77 percent of the variance of intent to use the technology was explained by three attitude variables (beliefs related to perceived relative advantage and compatibility with previous work patterns as well as result demonstrability), and one variable associated with subjective norms (influence of a senior policymaker, the director of nursing). Use of this model may provide insights for administrators managing the process of information technology implementation in health care.
PubMed ID
10137056 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advance directives: the views of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221256
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Apr 15;148(8):1331-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1993
Author
M. Kelner
I L Bourgeault
P C Hébert
E V Dunn
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Science, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Apr 15;148(8):1331-8
Date
Apr-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advance Directives - statistics & numerical data
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Medicine
Family Practice
Female
Geriatrics
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Intensive Care
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medical Oncology
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined the views and experiences of 20 physicians and 20 nurses at a major Canadian teaching hospital regarding the use of advance directives in clinical care.
The participants were purposively drawn from four clinical specialties: family and community medicine, oncology, intensive care and geriatrics. Detailed interviews were conducted in person. Content analysis was used to code the data, which were further analysed with both quantitative and qualitative techniques.
Thirty-nine of the 40 participants favoured the use of advance directives in clinical care; physicians had somewhat less positive attitudes than nurses toward such directives. Advance directives were thought by participants to be helpful in resolving disagreements between patients and their families about treatment options; in making patients more comfortable, both physically and psychologically, during the process of dying; and in opening up communication and trust among patients, their families and health care professionals. Concerns about the use of advance directives focused on the lack of clarity in some patients' instructions, the absence of legal status for directives, the possible interference with a practitioner's clinical judgement, the adequacy and appropriateness of patients' information about their circumstances, and the type of intervention (passive or active) requested by patients.
New regulations and legislation are making the use of advance directives more widespread. Health care professionals should participate in the development and implementation of these directives. Continuing professional education is essential in this regard.
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1989 Aug;149(8):1851-62764656
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Jun 9;261(22):3288-932636851
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Aug 12;260(6):803-73392811
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1985 Jun;145(6):1115-74004437
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Nov 3;262(17):2411-42795826
Cites: JAMA. 1985 Jan 4;253(1):54-73964898
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1991 Oct 15;115(8):639-431892335
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Aug 15;145(4):307-111873764
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 May 1;144(9):1133-82018965
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Mar 28;324(13):889-952000111
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Mar 28;324(13):882-82000110
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Feb 1;322(5):309-152296273
Cites: Gerontologist. 1989 Oct;29(5):615-212599421
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Jan 1;142(1):23-61688397
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Nov 3;262(17):2415-92795827
PubMed ID
8462055 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agitation in demented patients in an acute care hospital: prevalence, disruptiveness, and staff burden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193757
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001 Jun;13(2):183-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
R. Sourial
J. McCusker
M. Cole
M. Abrahamowicz
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Quality Management, St Mary's Hospital, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2001 Jun;13(2):183-97
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aggression - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Dementia - complications - psychology
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Prevalence
Psychomotor Agitation - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND/LITERATURE REVIEW: The prevalence of agitated behaviors in different populations with dementia is between 24% and 98%. Although agitated behaviors are potentially disruptive, little research attention has been focused on the effects of these behaviors upon nursing staff. The objectives of this study of demented patients in long-term-care beds at an acute care community hospital were to determine the frequency and disruptiveness of agitated behaviors; to investigate the associations of patient characteristics and interventions with the level of agitation; and to explore the burden of these agitated behaviors on nursing staff.
The study sample comprised 56 demented patients in the long-term-care unit during the study period. Twenty-seven staff who cared for these patients during three shifts over a 2-week period were interviewed to rate the frequency and disruptiveness of agitated behaviors using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, and the burden of care using a modified version of the Zarit Burden Interview. Data on patient characteristics and interventions extracted from the hospital chart included scores on the Barthel Index and Mini-Mental State Examination, the use of psychotropic medication, and the use of physical restraints.
Ninety-five percent of the patients with dementia were reported to have at least one agitated behavior; 75% had at least one moderately disruptive behavior. A small group of six patients (11%) had 17 or more disruptive behaviors. The frequency of most behaviors did not vary significantly by shift. Length of stay on long-term care, Barthel Index score, and the use of psychotropic medications were significantly associated with the number of agitated behaviors. The number of behaviors, their mean frequency, and their mean disruptiveness were all significantly correlated with staff burden.
The prevalence of agitated behaviors in patients with dementia in long-term-care beds at an acute care hospital is similar to that reported in long-term-care facilities. These behaviors are associated with staff burden.
PubMed ID
11495393 View in PubMed
Less detail

406 records – page 1 of 41.