Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

BCLS certification of the nursing staff: an evidence-based approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171587
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2006 Jan-Mar;21(1):63-9
Publication Type
Article

Comparison of competence assessments made by nurse managers and practising nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182608
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Nov;11(6):404-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Riitta Meretoja
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Nursing Director, Corporate Headquarters, Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa Professor, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. rita.meretoja@hus.fi
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Nov;11(6):404-9
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Employee Performance Appraisal - standards
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Nurse Administrators - education - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Nursing, Supervisory
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Abstract
This study compares nurse and manager assessments of nurse competence in a university hospital setting. Although managers carry out annual reviews, few studies have examined the agreement between the competence assessments made by practising nurses and their managers. Using a pretested 73-item questionnaire, consisting of seven competence categories, we compared self-assessments and manager assessments of the level of nurse competence on a Visual Analogue Scale of 0-100 and the frequency of using competencies by using statistical analyses. Managers assessed the overall level of competence (70.8 +/- 19.3 vs. 63.9 +/- 13.7) (mean +/- SD) and the level of competence in five competence categories significantly higher than the nurses themselves. A high degree of agreement was found between the assessments for the frequency of using competencies. These results can be used to encourage nurses and to improve the quality of care in different hospital work environments.
PubMed ID
14641722 View in PubMed
Less detail

Competence profiles of recently registered nurses working in intensive and emergency settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160757
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2007 Nov;15(8):792-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Anne H Salonen
Marja Kaunonen
Riitta Meretoja
Marja-Terttu Tarkka
Author Affiliation
Joint Authority of Helsinki and Uusimaa, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki, Finland. anne.h.salonen@welho.com
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2007 Nov;15(8):792-800
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emergency Nursing - education - standards
Employee Performance Appraisal
Female
Finland
Humans
Inservice training
Intensive Care
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Preceptorship
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Self-Assessment
Abstract
Preceptorship is an essential method of supporting nurse competence, guaranteeing high quality care and increasing job satisfaction.
To describe recently registered nurses' perceptions of their competence level, and to identify factors influencing these perceptions.
The survey was conducted by using Meretoja's Nurse Competence Scale. The sample comprised 235 registered nurses working in intensive and emergency settings. The data were analysed by using statistical methods.
Nurses' self-assessed competence level ranged from moderate to good. A statistically significant association was seen between competence level and age, length of current work experience and the frequency of using competencies.
The results shed useful light on the educational needs of nurses and provide important clues for the development of preceptorship programmes. The Nurse Competence Scale proved to be a reliable and valid instrument in assessing the competence of recently registered nurses. Implications for nursing management We recommend that management strategies be developed to enhance and support positive learning environments for competence development. We recommend preceptorship programmes based on systematic competence assessments made by nurses themselves, their preceptors and managers.
PubMed ID
17944604 View in PubMed
Less detail

Education to improve the triage of mental health patients in general hospital emergency departments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166866
Source
Accid Emerg Nurs. 2006 Oct;14(4):210-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Diana E Clarke
Anne-Marie Brown
Linda Hughes
Lori Motluk
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2. Diana_Clarke@UManitoba.ca
Source
Accid Emerg Nurs. 2006 Oct;14(4):210-8
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Emergency Nursing - education
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - standards
Hospitals, General
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Manitoba
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs
Self Efficacy
Time Factors
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Triage - standards
Abstract
General hospital emergency departments (EDs) are obvious places for individuals in distress or in a mental health crisis to seek assistance. However, triage nurses admit to a lack of expertise and confidence in psychiatric assessment which can result in less accurate assessments than for medical or trauma presentations. The objectives of a collaborative project between an Adult Mental Health Program and an Adult Emergency Program in a Canadian regional health authority were to: provide education and training to triage nurses regarding mental health and illness; monitor the transit of mental health patients through the ED; monitor wait times; and determine the adequacy of the Canadian Triage Acuity and Assessment Scale in the triage of psychiatric presentations. Although the percentages of patients triaged as "emergent" did not change as a result of the education, the percentage of patients who were triaged as "not urgent" but required hospitalization was significantly reduced. Although average lengths of stay in the ED were also reduced after the education, this may or may not have been related to the educational sessions. The project was successful in increasing collaboration between the two departments and has resulted in enhanced, on-going mental health education for ED nurses.
PubMed ID
17067798 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effects of clinical supervision on the quality of care: examining the results of team supervision.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195374
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Feb;33(4):492-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
K. Hyrkäs
M. Paunonen-Ilmonen
Author Affiliation
Researcher, Doctoral Student, Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. nueihy@uta.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Feb;33(4):492-502
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Finland
Focus Groups
Hospitals, University
Humans
Nursing Care - standards
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
AIM(S) OF THE STUDY: This study is part of a larger research project (1995-1998) aiming at quality improvement by means of clinical supervision (CS). The purpose of the study is to ascertain the conceptions of five ward teams having CS of its effects on the quality of care.
The quality of nursing care has been debated since at least the 1980s. An extensive literature and research reports describe a variety of interventions and methods to improve the quality of care. One of the interventions is CS. However, the amount of empirical research exploring the effects of CS especially on the quality of care is limited.
Data were collected using group interviews and analysed using the method of phenomenography.
The following categories describing the conceptions related to CS and to the quality of care emerged: knowledge, change and 'I and we as providers of quality'. Conceptions of the effects varied between and within the teams and sometimes contradicted each other. The importance of knowledge was underlined on three of the five wards. The patient's point of view emerged only on one ward.
It can be concluded that CS has effects on the quality of care and it can be considered a quality improving intervention in nursing practice. However, the knowledge of the different conceptions produced in this study also gives proof that team supervision is a challenge for supervisors.
PubMed ID
11251737 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indicators for competent nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191134
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2002 Mar;10(2):95-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Riitta Meretoja
Elina Eriksson
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. riitta.meretoja@hus.fi
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2002 Mar;10(2):95-102
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Cooperative Behavior
Finland
Holistic Nursing - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Description
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - classification - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper identifies and classifies indicators for competent nursing practice and validates these indicators in a variety of settings. Descriptive data to address competent practice in a variety of settings were collected from staff nurses, head nurses and nursing directors in an acute 1000-bed university hospital in Finland.
The data obtained from 25 expert groups were analysed to identify a clinical set of indicators for competent nursing practice from the data. The relevance of this set of indicators in a variety of clinical settings was further validated with a second sample of expert nurses (n = 26). Thereafter, data were analysed to identify generic competencies that were applicable to all clinical working environments.
Twenty-three generic indicators of competent nursing practice were identified in a variety of settings. The findings suggest that these competence indicators are meaningful to nurses with various backgrounds and practice settings.
Collaboration and coordination, as well as the holistic management of the situation, are highly recognized as meaningful characteristics of competent nursing practice.
PubMed ID
11882110 View in PubMed
Less detail

The influence of staff training on the violence prevention and management climate in psychiatric inpatient units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124042
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2013 Apr;20(5):396-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
A. Björkdahl
G. Hansebo
T. Palmstierna
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.bjorkdahl@sll.se
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2013 Apr;20(5):396-404
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - manpower - standards
Sweden
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Violence prevention and management is an important part of inpatient psychiatric nursing and specific staff training is regarded essential. The training should be based on primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. In Stockholm, Sweden, the Bergen model is a staff-training programme that combines this preventive approach with the theoretical nursing framework of the City model that includes three staff factors: positive appreciation of patients, emotional regulation and effective structure. We evaluated this combination of the Bergen and City models on the violence prevention and management climate in psychiatric inpatient wards. A 13-item questionnaire was developed and distributed to patients and staff in 41 wards before the staff was trained and subsequently to 19 of these wards after training. Data analyses included factor analysis, Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U-test. The result showed that the staff on trained wards had a more positive perception of four of the items and the patients of one item. These items reflected causes of patient aggression, ward rules, the staff's emotional regulation and early interventions. The findings suggest that a focus on three levels of prevention within a theoretical nursing framework may promote a more positive violence prevention and management climate on wards.
PubMed ID
22632809 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the organ donor process: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133948
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Jan;68(1):104-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Käthe Meyer
Ida Torunn Bjørk
Hilde Eide
Author Affiliation
Department of Organ Transplantation, Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. kathe.meyer@ous-hf.no
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Jan;68(1):104-15
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Family - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Norway
Nurse's Role
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Professional Competence
Professional-Family Relations
Self-Assessment
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - ethics - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study that explored Norwegian intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence to identify educational needs in the organ donor process.
Intensive care professionals are requested to consider organ donation each time they care for patients with severe cerebral lesion to ensure donor organs for transplantation. The donor process challenges intensive care nurses' professional competence. Nurses' knowledge and experience may influence their professional competence in caring for organ donors and their relatives. METHODS.: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in all 28 Norwegian donor hospitals between October 2008 and January 2009. Intensive care nurses (N = 801) were invited to participate and the response rate was 71·4%. Dimensions of professional competence, learning needs and contextual and demographic variables were explored. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.
Few intensive care nurses had extensive experience of or competence and training in organ donation. Nurses working at university hospitals had more experience, but lesser training than nurses in local hospitals. Experience of donor acquisition had an impact on intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the donor process. Discussions on the ward and educational input were seen as important for the further development of professional competence.
Training provided by experienced colleagues and a culture that encourages discussion about aspects of the donor process can develop nurses' professional competence and communally defined professional practice. Educational input that cultivates various types of knowledge can be beneficial in organ donation.
PubMed ID
21645048 View in PubMed
Less detail

One-on-one coaching to improve pain assessment and management practices of pediatric nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160164
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Dec;22(6):467-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
C Céleste Johnston
Anita Gagnon
Janet Rennick
Christina Rosmus
Hélène Patenaude
Jaqueline Ellis
Carla Shapiro
Françoise Filion
Judith Ritchie
Jasmine Byron
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. celeste.johnston@mcgill.ca
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Dec;22(6):467-78
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Feedback, Psychological
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Pain - diagnosis - nursing
Pain Measurement - nursing - standards
Pediatric Nursing - education - standards
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Single-Blind Method
Social Support
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Pain in children is infrequently assessed and managed by nurses. One-on-one coaching based on audit with feedback and the use of opinion leaders have been effective in changing professional health care practices. Coaching by an opinion leader for changing pediatric nurses' pain practices was tested in a clustered randomized trial in six Canadian pediatric hospitals. The rate of pain assessments, nurses' knowledge, and nonpharmacological interventions increased in the coaching group. However, there were significant site differences that could not be attributed to the coaching but to factors inherent in the sites. The context in which interventions are implemented will influence the effectiveness of individualized interventions.
PubMed ID
18036467 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patients' perceptions of quality of care at an emergency department and identification of areas for quality improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81261
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Aug;15(8):1045-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Muntlin Asa
Gunningberg Lena
Carlsson Marianne
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. asa.muntlin@pubcare.uu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Aug;15(8):1045-56
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Emergency Nursing - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Empathy
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Patient Education - standards
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care - standards
Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
AIMS: This paper reports a study to identify patient's perceptions of quality of care at an emergency department and areas for quality improvement. BACKGROUND: Patients are not always satisfied with the care received at emergency departments. More attention needs to be paid to the specific needs and expectations of the non-urgent group of patients, who make up the majority of attenders at many emergency departments. Nurses' and physicians' perceptions about good quality of care do not always agree with patients' perceptions. Instruments measuring patient satisfaction have often been focused on inpatient treatment. METHOD: A prospective, descriptive survey design was adopted and the study took place in one emergency department at a Swedish university hospital in 2002. The participants were 99 women and 101 men, with an average age of 51 years. The emergency department version of the questionnaire Quality from the Patient's Perspective was used for data collection. RESULTS: Patients estimated quality of care at the emergency department as fairly good, but there were areas in need of improvement. A high percent of inadequate quality was related to the environment in the emergency department. About 20% of patients reported that they did not receive effective pain relief. More than 20% estimated that nurses did not show an interest in their life situation and patients did not receive useful information on self-care and about which physician was responsible for their medical care. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a research-based instrument gave valuable information for quality improvement in clinical practice. Many of the identified areas for quality improvement are related to nursing care. Therefore, the importance of nursing care in the emergency department should be highlighted to nurses and physicians and they also need to be more attentive to the need of the individual patient. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Identifying areas for quality improvements are important, to know where to take action. These findings may facilitate the work with changing attitudes and working routines, which are needed to deliver effective care and to improve patients' perceptions of quality of care at emergency departments.
PubMed ID
16879549 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.