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Assistive computing devices: a pilot study to explore nurses' preferences and needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166500
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;24(6):328-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alex Mihailidis
Laura Krones
Jennifer Boger
Author Affiliation
Intelligent Assistive Technology and Systems Laboratory, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. alex.mihailidis@utoronto.ca
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;24(6):328-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems
Computers, Handheld - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Drug Information Services
Drug Therapy - nursing
Drug Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Female
Humans
Needs Assessment
Numerical Analysis, Computer-Assisted
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Reminder Systems
Safety Management
Abstract
Healthcare errors among nurses are common because of the fast-paced work environment, in which extensive data must be analyzed and quick decision making is required. Assistive computing devices can help reduce nursing errors by providing timely access to client information and by assisting nurses with client monitoring, decision making, and bedside documentation. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine what assistive computing device features, functions, and input/output modalities nurses would find most useful as support for their nursing duties. Twenty nurses completed a questionnaire that examined their needs and preferences. Data analysis revealed a strong desire for capabilities related to facilitating information access and administering safe medication. The results of this study will be used to develop design criteria for an assistive computing device that will aim to improve the performance of nurses through appropriate information and data support.
PubMed ID
17108752 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of Danish doctors and nurses to palliative and terminal care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51880
Source
Palliat Med. 2005 Mar;19(2):119-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
T. Vejlgaard
J M Addington-Hall
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital of Viborg, London. tvejlgaard@hospice.vejleamt.dk
Source
Palliat Med. 2005 Mar;19(2):119-27
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Palliative Care - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Primary Health Care
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Terminal Care - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The WHO definitions of palliative care have been adopted in Denmark and implemented in The National Guidelines from 1999, but service developments have been very slow and not according to the recommendations. Attitudes to palliative care of Danish doctors and nurses may in part account for this. OBJECTIVE: To assess the attitudes to issues related to palliative care of doctors and nurses in a Danish county hospital and the related primary care services. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey using a mailed, self-administered questionnaire answered anonymously. PARTICIPANTS: Nurses and doctors employed in a county hospital in Denmark, homecare nurses and general practitioners from the related primary care services. OUTCOME MEASURES: The responses from the groups were compared by chi2 statistics (where ordinal variables with chi2 for trend). Data were analysed using SPSS 10.0. RESULTS: 347 responded, response rate 76%. Eighty-one per cent of all respondents were currently caring for terminally ill patient(s), 94% had done so within the last six months. Hospital doctors see more terminally ill patients than GPs (P = 0.002). Comparison of doctors (both hospital and GPs) with nurses showed that nurses were more likely to definitely agree that palliative/terminal care was a rewarding part of their work (61% 'definitely agree' versus 30%), and they were less likely to prefer to leave care of these patients to others (4% 'definitely/probably agree' versus 9%). Nurses reflected more on existential matters (80% 'definitely/probably agree' versus 63%) and were more likely to agree that dealing with a dying patient made them aware of their own feelings regarding death (97% 'definitely/probably agree' versus 80%). Only 7% of all respondents reported 'being an active member of a religious community'. Ninety-two per cent of all respondents agreed that doctors play a key role in reducing the suffering of dying patients, but 59% of nurses versus 9% of doctors 'definitely/probably agree' that 'it is primarily the task of nurses to deal with patients reactions to death'. There were significant differences between hospital doctors and GPs, with the former less likely to agree that palliative and terminal illness is rewarding, more likely to leave care of dying patients to others, and more likely to 'probably' or 'definitely agree' that it is more satisfying to work with patients who will improve. Home care nurses reflected more on existential matters than their hospital colleagues, and were more likely to 'definitely agree' that palliative/terminal care is rewarding. Differences between groups seemed to be due to profession (doctor versus nurse) and setting (hospital versus community) rather than age or gender. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that in Denmark nurses demonstrate more positive attitudes to the care of palliative/terminally ill patients than doctors, and that attitudes amongst doctors and nurses working in the community are more positive than those of the colleagues in hospitals. There is currently little education in the principles and practice of palliative care in Denmark. These findings will inform the development of appropriate palliative care education for doctors and nurses working both in the hospital and in the community in Denmark. They also raise the possibility that part of the inertia in the development of palliative care in Denmark is related to the lack of education and, in particular, to the need of support for doctors and nurses providing terminal care so they are enabled to be more reflective on the care they currently provide. There is evidence that education in palliative care can change health professionals' attitudes to palliative and terminal care, and this now needs to be investigated in Denmark.
PubMed ID
15810750 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of nursing staff in general medical wards towards activation of stroke patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243818
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1982 Jan;7(1):33-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1982
Author
E. Hamrin
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1982 Jan;7(1):33-42
Date
Jan-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cerebrovascular Disorders - rehabilitation
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Humans
Motivation
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Nursing, Practical
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The attitudes and motivation of the nursing staff towards activation of stroke patients were studies. Staff members from two experimental wards received an educational programme on stroke. Concurrently the patients on their wards received an individually adapted nursing programme with emphasis on activation. The attitudes of the nursing staff on these wards and on two identical control wards in the same hospital were examined at 3-month intervals with the help of a 24-item questionnaire. There was a significant change in attitudes, judged on a scale constructed from 14 items, among the staff of the experimental wards during a 6-month period. There were also positive changes in individual items such as attitudes to long-term care. Fewer changes were noted among the untrained auxiliaries than among the trained staff. The high rate of turnover, especially among the untrained staff, led to certain difficulties in the collection and interpretation of data. In conclusion, the educational programme and also perhaps, the other activities of the experimental wards seemed to have affected the attitude of the staff to some extent in a positive direction.
PubMed ID
6917868 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of practicing nurses as predictors of intended care behavior with persons who are HIV positive: testing the Ajzen-Fishbein Theory of Reasoned Action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219727
Source
Res Nurs Health. 1993 Dec;16(6):441-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
H K Laschinger
D. Goldenberg
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 1993 Dec;16(6):441-50
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
HIV Seropositivity - nursing - transmission
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Logic
Motivation
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Psychological Theory
Regression Analysis
Semantic Differential
Abstract
The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine practicing nurses' attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions to care for HIV positive patients, using the Theory of Reasoned Action. One hundred and forty-one subjects completed a questionnaire developed according to guidelines described by Ajzen and Fishbein (1980). Consistent with the theory, nurses' attitudes and subjective norms were found to be significant predictors of intentions to care for persons who are HIV positive (R2 = 0.27). Personal beliefs found to discriminate between intenders and nonintenders were those related to possible consequences for self, family, and friends, but not job-related consequences. Normative beliefs which discriminated between groups were also related to nonprofessional referents' expectations. In addition, qualitative data showed persistent concerns about occupational risk for contracting AIDS. Based on the results of this research, it is recommended that nurse educators in both clinical and academic settings, target specific educational/training interventions to include transmission, prevention, as well as exploration of feelings, attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions about HIV-related topics. Further theory-based research and testing of interventions to change practicing nurses' attitudes and beliefs about HIV disease are advocated.
PubMed ID
8248571 View in PubMed
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Attitudinal patterns determining decision-making in severely ill elderly patients: a cross-cultural comparison between nurses from Sweden and Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71901
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Aug;38(4):381-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
J. Richter
M R Eisemann
Author Affiliation
Department and University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Rostock University, Gehlsheimer Str. 20, 18147 Rostock, Germany. joerg.richter@med.uni-rostock.de
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Aug;38(4):381-8
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Advance Directives
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Decision Making
Dementia - classification - complications - therapy
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Germany
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Competency
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Questionnaires
Resuscitation Orders
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Abstract
To explain determinants in the decision-making of nurses in the treatment of severely ill incompetent patients and to describe underlying attitudes, consecutive samples of nurses from Germany and Sweden have been investigated by means of a case scenario and a questionnaire. Whereas the level of dementia emerged as the only factor being significantly related with the treatment option within the Swedish group, patient's age, patient's wishes and ethical concerns were correlated among German nurses. The more the nurses have been able to participate in the provision of the available do-not-resuscitate order or of an advance directive, the less frequent they would perform CPR against the patient's wishes.
PubMed ID
11470096 View in PubMed
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Barriers to and facilitators of research utilization, as perceived by a group of registered nurses in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205758
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Apr;27(4):798-807
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
K. Nilsson Kajermo
G. Nordström
A. Krusebrant
H. Björvell
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute at the Karolinska Hospital and Stockholm University College of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1998 Apr;27(4):798-807
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Communication Barriers
Diffusion of Innovation
Humans
Information Services
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Organizational Culture
Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Management
Abstract
A survey was conducted to describe registered nurses' (n = 237), perceptions of the barriers to and the facilitators of research utilization at two hospitals in Sweden. A questionnaire, Barriers and Facilitators to Using Research in Practice developed by Funk et al., was used to collect the data. The major barriers to research utilization were that the research is not readily available along with inadequate facilities for implementation of research findings, lack of competent colleagues with whom to discuss research, lack of time for reading and implementing research findings and the nurses lack of authority in the organization. The nurses who had studied research methods in their basic nursing education, seemed to perceive fewer barriers than those who had not. The facilitating factors most frequently suggested by the nurses were diverse models of education to increase their knowledge of research methods and to develop skills in evaluating research findings. The allocation of resources for education and implementation of research findings in clinical practice, in addition to special positions in clinical practice for nurses with scientific qualifications, were also suggested.
PubMed ID
9578211 View in PubMed
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BCLS certification of the nursing staff: an evidence-based approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171587
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2006 Jan-Mar;21(1):63-9
Publication Type
Article

Blood exposure: factors promoting health care workers' compliance with guidelines in connection with risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179756
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Jul;13(5):547-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Ulla-Britt Lymer
Bengt Richt
Barbro Isaksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. ulla-britt.lymer@hhj.hj.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Jul;13(5):547-54
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Organizational Culture
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socialization
Stereotyping
Sweden - epidemiology
Universal Precautions
Abstract
Health care workers compliance with guidelines, universal precautions, in connection with tasks that could involve contact with patient's blood is unsatisfactory. In a previous paper, we identified different forces that undermine compliance. Socialization into infection control, routinization, stereotyping, perceptions of patients' wishes and the presence of competing values and norms are examples of such forces.
The aim of this article is to describe and analyse different forces that promote adherence to universal precautions. Behavioural variations are seen as a consequence of differences between wards with regard to the safety culture. Safety culture is conceptualized as the outcome of a constant interplay between deactivating and reactivating forces. In this article the focus is on the latter.
The grounded theory approach. Data were collected through interviews with nurses and assistant nurses.
The charge nurse, informal leaders, students, infection control nurses, type of work, availability of equipment, blood-exposure incidents and media-coverage of infectious diseases are described as potentially important for compliance. The properties these agents must possess in order to be influential are also described.
The outcome of an occupationally acquired infection can be fatal. Hence it is important that health care workers take protective measures. The results imply that mere information about safe practices alone is insufficient to achieve that goal. All factors of importance for compliance must be taken in to consideration in clinical work and in education.
PubMed ID
15189407 View in PubMed
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Bridging obstacles to transcultural caring relationships--tools discovered through interviews with staff in pediatric oncology care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86530
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Feb;12(1):35-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Pergert Pernilla
Ekblad Solvig
Enskär Karin
Björk Olle
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital/Solna Q6:05, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. pernilla.pergert@ki.se
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Feb;12(1):35-43
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Child
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Empathy
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Neoplasms - ethnology - nursing
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Oncologic Nursing - education - methods
Pediatric Nursing - education - methods
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - education - methods
Abstract
In this qualitative study we explored how health-care staff continuously resolve "obstacles to transcultural caring relationships" as they care for families with an immigrant background within the context of pediatric oncology care. A constant comparative method was used and data collection included 5 focus group interviews and 5 complementary individual interviews with health-care staff within pediatric oncology care. Bridging emerged as the way that health-care staff deal with obstacles to transcultural caring relationships. Bridging is a process in which various tools may be used and combined, including communicational tools, transcultural tools and organizational tools. Failure to use tools, or to use and combine them insufficiently, can bring the caring relationship to a halt, which leads to inequity in care. In order to ensure the provision of high-quality care despite differences in religion, culture, language and social situation, health-care staff need to bridge obstacles to transcultural caring relationships.
PubMed ID
18218338 View in PubMed
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143 records – page 1 of 15.