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1618 records – page 1 of 162.

2nd National Survey Report. Expanded role of the operating room nurse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218670
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1994 Mar-Apr;12(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article

Absenteeism among hospital nurses: an idiographic-longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230791
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
R D Hackett
P. Bycio
R M Guion
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Attitude of Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
United States
Abstract
For several months, nurses completed ratings of the degree to which certain events relevant to absence were present during each of their scheduled workdays. The event ratings for days when the nurses decided to be absent were then compared with those for days when the nurses attended. As expected, certain events, such as ill health and tiredness, tended to covary and proved to be consistently related to absenteeism across nurses. Also as expected, some events that were not especially relevant for the nurses as a whole, like having a sick family member or friend and concerns about previous poor attendance, nonetheless emerged as being relevant to the absence behavior of certain individuals. Finally, some events were consistently related to the nurses' expressed desire to be absent but not to actual absences. We discuss these differences from two perspectives, one emphasizing the role of attribution bias and the other, a two-stage process in which such bias has no major role.
PubMed ID
10293533 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism among hospital staff during an influenza epidemic: implications for immunoprophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240175
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1984
Author
G W Hammond
M. Cheang
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Date
Sep-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Personnel, Hospital
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The 1980-81 epidemic of influenza A/Bangkok 79 was responsible for increased absenteeism (1.7 times the rate for the corresponding period of the subsequent nonepidemic year) among selected hospital staff in Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre. Retrospective study of employment records for 25 of the centre's largest departments showed excess sick-leave costs of about $24 500 during the 2-week period of peak absenteeism that included the epidemic. Although the centre was sampling prospectively for the virus the first positive results became available too late for chemoprophylactic measures to have been effective. The greater increase in absenteeism among nursing staff caring for patients with chronic respiratory disease and nurses working on general medical or pediatric acute infection/isolation wards suggested that these groups be targeted for influenza vaccination in hospitals.
Notes
Cites: South Med J. 1977 Aug;70(8):1023-4887968
Cites: Chest. 1977 May;71(5):576-9852336
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1976 Sep;104(3):248-55961691
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1959 Jan;38(1 Part 2):199-21213620783
Cites: Pediatrics. 1975 May;55(5):673-71168894
Cites: JAMA. 1973 Mar 12;223(11):1233-54739326
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1971 Apr;123(4):446-545110741
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1982;4:25-446754408
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1982 Oct;116(4):589-987137146
Cites: JAMA. 1982 Mar 12;247(10):1451-37057536
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1976 Apr;113(4):487-911267254
Cites: JAMA. 1980 Dec 5;244(22):2547-97431593
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 Mar 16;298(11):587-92628375
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Dec;91(6):974-6925833
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1981 Nov;144(5):433-416273473
PubMed ID
6467117 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A M Malek
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Alberta
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Motivation
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Seasons
Stress, Physiological
PubMed ID
3342947 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
K H Beine
Author Affiliation
Hans-Prinzhorn-Klinik, Hemer.
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Date
1995
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Homicide - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Liability, Legal
Male
Nursing Staff, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Professional Impairment - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The phenomenon of patient homicides committed by health service employees has, in the previous years, repeatedly aroused much attention. The cases made known in Germany, the USA, Holland, Norway, and Austria appear to provide evidence to the effect that we are not only dealing with unique incidents. The scientific investigation of this especially sensitive taboo-topic is, to date, missing. The judicial trials carried out emphatically indicate that culprit motives, colleague behavior, but also to a large extent decisions made by superiors remain unclear. It remains controversial, what effect working conditions, strain of employees, their level of education and personal viewpoints over such criminal acts they possess. Finally, the long latency period between the first internal suspicions and the responsible parties' appropriate reactions requires duplicatable explanation. The following paper presents a German single-case study of patient homicide by a female nurse. The focus on causality rests on the presentation of developments up to the point where the long-fermenting suspicion could no longer be dismissed, and appropriate consequences took place. The account largely avoids the "definite" findings required during the judicial process. It concerns rather above all an open, uncertain, and possibly without external influence course of development which in stages each colleague in the health professions can trace, to the point where the uncertain and horrifying suspicion became a certainty. With this single-case study in hand it is made understandable in which ways personal circumstances and professional conditions at the worksituation can intertwine in such a way that the original motivation to help turns into its abysmal opposite. It is the author's intention to make preventive learning possible through this single case study. Every employee in the health professions should proceed on the assumption that such occurrences could also in his own field of work come to pass. In this respect, it is of considerable importance to differentiate between hasty and untenable incriminations and original increasing early-warning signs.
PubMed ID
7785282 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of RNFA by surgeons and staff overwhelming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203416
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
S. Carver
K. Allen
Author Affiliation
Brantford General Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Operating Room Nursing - trends
Physician-Nurse Relations
PubMed ID
9883118 View in PubMed
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Accounting for care: exploring tensions and contradictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129810
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2011 Oct-Dec;34(4):330-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jacqueline A Choiniere
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jacchoin@yorku.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2011 Oct-Dec;34(4):330-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Nurses
Nursing Care - psychology - standards
Nursing Staff, Hospital - economics
Philosophy, Nursing
Abstract
Within the context of neoliberal restructuring, accountability is primarily linked to efficiency, determined through standardized, numerically based technologies and focused on lengths of stay, utilization indicators, and the like. Disappearing from view in this approach is what is actually happening at the point of care for registered nurses. Grounded in semistructured interviews, this article casts a critical light on the tensions and contradictions experienced by nurses, arguing that instead of a more accountable, effective, or efficient system, this path is jeopardizing nurses' ability to provide needed care within healthy, supportive work environments, setting into motion a fundamental transformation of nursing practice.
PubMed ID
22067232 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and concordance of nurses in emergency department triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171723
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Dec;19(4):432-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Katarina Göransson
Anna Ehrenberg
Bertil Marklund
Margareta Ehnfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Orebro University, Sweden. katarina.goransson@hi.oru.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Dec;19(4):432-8
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Nursing - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - standards
Observer Variation
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
Triage - classification
Abstract
In the emergency department (ED) Registered Nurses (RNs) often perform triage, i.e. the sorting and prioritizing of patients. The allocation of acuity ratings is commonly based on a triage scale. To date, three reliable 5-level triage scales exist, of which the Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) is one. In Sweden, few studies on ED triage have been conducted and the organization of triage has been found to vary considerably with no common triage scale. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and concordance of emergency nurses acuity ratings of patient scenarios in the ED setting. Totally, 423 RNs from 48 (62%) Swedish EDs each triaged 18 patient scenarios using the CTAS. Of the 7,550 triage ratings, 57.6% were triaged in concordance with the expected outcome and no scenario was triaged into the same triage level by all RNs. Inter-rater agreement for all RNs was kappa = 0.46 (unweighted) and kappa = 0.71 (weighted). The fact that the kappa-values are only moderate to good and the low concordance between the RNs call for further studies, especially from a patient safety perspective.
PubMed ID
16324070 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of nurses' estimates of their absenteeism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142102
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Jul;18(5):599-605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Alice Gaudine
Connie Gregory
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1B 3V6. agaudine@mun.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2010 Jul;18(5):599-605
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nurse Administrators
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to determine the accuracy of nurses' self-reports of absence by examining: (1) the correlation, intra-class correlation, and Cronbach's alpha for self-reported absence and absence as reported in organizational records, (2) difference in central tendency for the two measures of absence and (3) the percentage of nurses who underestimate their absence.
Research on nurses' absenteeism has often relied on self-reports of absence. However, nurses may not be aware of their actual absenteeism, or they may underestimate it.
Self-reported absence from questionnaires completed by 215 Canadian nurses was compared with their absence from organizational records.
There is a strong positive correlation, a strong intra-class correlation and Cronbach's alpha for the two measures of absence. However, there is a difference in central tendency that is related to the majority of nurses in this study (51.1%) underestimating their days absent from work.
Research examining the predictors of absence may consider measuring absence with self-reports. Nevertheless, nurses demonstrated a bias to underestimate their absence.
Feedback interventions to reduce absenteeism can be developed to include providing nurses with accurate information about their absence.
PubMed ID
20636509 View in PubMed
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1618 records – page 1 of 162.