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37 records – page 1 of 4.

An intravenous therapy audit program is possible.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244517
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 May;58(5):19-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
K. Ely
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 May;58(5):19-21
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Infusions, Parenteral - nursing - psychology - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Service, Hospital - standards
Ontario
PubMed ID
7250565 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Competence norms and criteria, are they a reality for the beneficiary?. Interview by Claudette Domingue].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239115
Source
Nurs Que. 1985 Mar-Apr;5(3):14-7
Publication Type
Article

Continuous quality improvement through team supervision supported by continuous self-monitoring of work and systematic patient feedback.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185852
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 May;11(3):177-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Kristiina Hyrkäs
Kristiina Lehti
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, 3rd Floor Clinical Science Building, Office CBS 6-131, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G3 Canada. kristiina.hyrkas@ualberta.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 May;11(3):177-88
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Feedback
Humans
Nursing Audit
Nursing Service, Hospital - standards
Nursing, Supervisory
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Patient satisfaction
Reproducibility of Results
Total Quality Management - methods
Abstract
Evaluation of clinical supervision (CS) and exploration of its effects on the quality of care is a timely topic for research. The current emphasis in nursing is shifting towards continuous quality improvement (CQI), and the integration of this with CS seems to be an interesting challenge. So far the studies have relied mainly on supervisees' self-report data and patients have rarely been involved in research. However, the perspective of CQI requires that patients are involved in the quality improving efforts.
The aim of this study is to describe how CQI was implemented through team supervision and supported by continuous self-monitoring of work and systematic patient feedback.
The team supervision intervention was organized on five wards between 1995 and 1998. The methods of statistical process control and control charts were applied in the study as part of the intervention.
Improvements in both patient satisfaction and the staff's self-monitoring of work were evidenced. A slow and minor upward trend was detected in the control charts and the variation decreased in the assessments. The patients' high and the staff's critical ratings drew nearer towards the end of the study. However, significant differences were found between the wards and not all wards showed improvements. Staff found it difficult to discern the effects of continuous patient satisfaction feedback and self-monitoring.
The findings of the study show that CQI integrated with team supervision improves patient satisfaction and the overall quality of care.
PubMed ID
12694365 View in PubMed
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Criteria map: potential for skin breakdown--a quality assurance tool for use in any setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229974
Source
QRB Qual Rev Bull. 1989 Nov;15(11):340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
M. Black
C. Van Berkel
E. Green
I. Everett
J. Krilyk
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
QRB Qual Rev Bull. 1989 Nov;15(11):340-6
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Nursing Audit - methods
Nursing Service, Hospital - standards
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Skin Ulcer - prevention & control
Abstract
An interagency group of nurses from five Hamilton, Ontario-area hospitals and community agencies developed a criteria map with a branching format to evaluate the potential for skin breakdown and to link patient characteristics to care decisions and outcomes of care. An existing criteria map originally intended for use solely in long term care settings was modified and tested by the group for additional use in acute care and community settings. The criteria map includes a reviewer's instruction manual and data collection summary forms. The map was tested for feasibility and interrater reliability and was proven to be a versatile, easy-to-use QA tool that can stimulate change in clinical and organizational practices.
PubMed ID
2512522 View in PubMed
Less detail

Describing and analyzing constipation in acute care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212308
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 1996 Apr;10(3):68-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
T. Moore
Y. Matyas
A. Boudreau
Author Affiliation
Department of Gerontology, Humber Memorial Hospital, Weston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 1996 Apr;10(3):68-74
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Constipation - nursing
Focus Groups
Forms and Records Control
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nursing Audit - methods
Nursing Service, Hospital - standards
Ontario
Professional Competence
Abstract
Many patients in acute care hospitals experience constipation, yet the literature on constipation focuses on long-term care and does not provide tools for describing and analyzing bowel management from the perspective of health care professionals or patients. The article describes the development of a bowel management task force at one acute care hospital and the initial steps taken to improve clinical quality in this area. A multifaceted approach was used to collect baseline data on practice, expectations, and problems related to bowel management. Valuable data were obtained from both patients and health care providers that have provided direction for improving clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction.
PubMed ID
8634472 View in PubMed
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Development of a quality assurance program: Colonel Belcher Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238159
Source
AARN News Lett. 1985 Nov;41(10):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985

Evaluating the care provided to long-stay patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234532
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1987 Nov;64(8):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987

Family dynamics and postnatal depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181211
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Apr;11(2):141-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
T. Tammentie
M-T Tarkka
P. Astedt-Kurki
E. Paavilainen
P. Laippala
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Research Unit, Tampere, Finland. tarja.tammentie@uta.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Apr;11(2):141-9
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - nursing - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Nursing Service, Hospital - standards
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
Research has shown that postnatal depression (PND) affects 10-15% of mothers in Western societies. PND is not easily identified and therefore it often remains undetected. Untreated depression has a detrimental effect on the mother and child and the entire family. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the state of family dynamics after delivery and whether the mother's PND was associated with family dynamics. The study used a survey covering the catchment area of one Finnish university hospital. Both primi- and multiparas took part and data were collected using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for mothers and the Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) for both mothers and fathers. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical programme and frequency and percentage distributions, means and standard deviations were examined. Correlations were analysed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The significance of any differences between mothers' and fathers' scores was determined with a paired t-test. Of the families participating in the study (373 mothers and 314 partners), 13% of the mothers suffered from PND symptoms (EPDS score of 13 or more). As a whole, family dynamics in the families participating in the study were reported to be rather good. However, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics compared with other families. With the exception of individuation, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics than their partners. With the exception of role reciprocity, non-depressed mothers reported more positive family dynamics than their partners. Knowledge of the association of mothers' PND with family dynamics could help to develop nursing care at maternity and child welfare clinics and maternity hospitals. Depressed mothers and their families need support to be able to make family dynamics as good as possible.
PubMed ID
15009488 View in PubMed
Less detail

37 records – page 1 of 4.