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456 records – page 1 of 46.

Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Publication Type
Article
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Clinical Nursing Research
History, 21st Century
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Male
Norway
Oncology Nursing - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The winner of the "Best Original Research Paper in Cancer Nursing" Award for 2013 is "Effects of an Internet Support System to Assist Cancer Patients in Reducing Symptom Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial" by Cornelia M. Ruland, PhD.
PubMed ID
24149985 View in PubMed
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Acculturation stress among Maya in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121282
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eugenia Millender
Author Affiliation
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA. emillend@fau.edu
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Diversity
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mexico - ethnology
Nursing Research
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Abstract: As health care disparities become more evident in our multicultural nation, culture sensitive health research needs to be a priority in order for good health care to take place. This article will explore the literature related to acculturation stress and mental health disparities among the Mayan population. Literatures of similar but distinct groups are included due to the limited amount of research of the Mayan population. Using Leiniger's Transcultural nursing theory, these findings suggest that nurses have a large gap to fill to address the mental health disparities of specific cultural groups like the indigenous Maya, thereby satisfying their nursing obligations.
PubMed ID
22924204 View in PubMed
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Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136673
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Salzmann-Erikson
Kim L Tz N
Ann-Britt Ivarsson
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dalarna University School of Health and Sciences, Falun, Sweden; Orebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Nursing Research
Crisis Intervention
Culture
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interview, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing, Team
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - nursing
Research Design
Security Measures
Social Environment
Social Values
Sweden
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.
PubMed ID
21355761 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture as an optional treatment for hospice patients with xerostomia: an intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89927
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2009 Jan;15(1):12-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Meidell Liv
Holritz Rasmussen Birgit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. liv.meidell@nurs.umu.se
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2009 Jan;15(1):12-20
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Clinical Nursing Research
Deglutition Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hospice Care - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications
Nursing Assessment
Saliva - secretion
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Xerostomia - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
More than 70% of seriously ill patients with cancer suffer from xerostomia and the associated problems of swallowing, chewing and speaking. This study aims to investigate whether treatment with acupuncture is a viable option for hospice patients with xerostomia. During a 2-year period, 117 patients were assessed for xerostomia. Eighty-two patients were found to have moderate xerostomia. Sixty-seven fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. Of these, 14 were included but only eight completed the study. Ten acupuncture treatments were given during a 5-week period. The effect of acupuncture was measured using a visual analogue scale, and by measuring the saliva production before and after the series of treatment. The results show that all the patients experienced alleviation of dryness of the mouth and the associated symptoms, and thus benefited from the acupuncture treatment. However, conducting a 5-week acupuncture intervention study is not feasible at an inpatient hospice due to the patients being too close to death.
PubMed ID
19234425 View in PubMed
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Advancing nursing leadership in long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143603
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jennifer O'Brien
Margaret Ringland
Susan Wilson
Author Affiliation
Human Resources and Support Services, St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph. jobrien@sjhcg.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics, Nursing
Focus Groups
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Leadership
Long-Term Care
Mentors
Nurse Administrators
Nurses
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Research
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Turnover
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Abstract
Nurses working in the long-term care (LTC) sector face unique workplace stresses, demands and circumstances. Designing approaches to leadership training and other supportive human-resource strategies that reflect the demands of the LTC setting fosters a positive work life for nurses by providing them with the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the care team and to address resident and family issues. Through the St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph demonstration site project, funded by the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Excelling as a Nurse Leader in Long Term Care training program and the Mentor Team program were developed to address these needs. Evaluation results show that not only have individual nurses benefitted from taking part in these programs, but also that the positive effects were felt in other parts of the LTC home (as reported by Directors of Care). By creating a generally healthier work environment, it is anticipated that these programs will also have a positive effect on recruitment and retention.
PubMed ID
20463447 View in PubMed
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Advocacy oral history: a research methodology for social activism in nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207189
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
A R Rafael
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Feminism
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Nursing Research - methods
Ontario
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Public health nursing
Reproducibility of Results
Social Change
Social Justice
Abstract
The reinstatement of social activism as a central feature of nursing practice has been advocated by nursing scholars and is consistent with contemporary conceptualizations of primary health care and health promotion that are rooted in critical social theory's concept of empowerment. Advocacy oral history from a feminist postmodern perspective offers a method of research that has the potential and purpose to empower participants to transform their political and social realities and may, therefore, be considered social activism. A recent study of public health nurses who had experienced significant distress through the reduction and redirection of their practice is provided as an exemplar of advocacy oral history. Philosophies underpinning the research method and characteristics of feminist postmodern research are reviewed and implications for the use of this methodology for social activism in nursing are drawn.
PubMed ID
9398937 View in PubMed
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An alternative approach to addressing missing indicators in parallel datasets: research utilization as a phantom latent variable.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161989
Source
Nurs Res. 2007 Jul-Aug;56(4 Suppl):S47-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
William K Midodzi
Leslie Hayduk
Greta G Cummings
Carole A Estabrooks
Lars Wallin
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Nurs Res. 2007 Jul-Aug;56(4 Suppl):S47-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Causality
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Linear Models
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Nursing Research - education - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research Design
Abstract
When doing secondary data analysis, it is not uncommon to find that a key variable was not measured. Often the researcher has no option but to do without the missing indicator, but when nearly parallel datasets exist, the researcher may have other options. In an earlier article leading up to this special issue, this research team was confronted with the problem that research utilization had been measured in only one of two similar datasets, namely, in the 1996 but not the 1998 Alberta Registered Nurse survey. The 1998 dataset had a larger sample size (6,526 compared to 600 nurse respondents in 1996) and a stronger set of measured variables, but was missing the key variable of interest--research utilization. To overcome this, a regression-based strategy was used to create a research utilization score for each nurse in the 1998 survey by exploiting the availability of several anticipated causes of research utilization in both datasets. Presented here is an alternative and more complicated procedure that might be applied in future investigations. The article presents a methodological understanding of how to use a phantom variable to account for the unmeasured research utilization variable in a two-group structural equation model. This approach could be used to overcome several of the limitations connected to using a regression-based approach to creating a key missing variable when nearly parallel datasets are available.
Notes
Comment On: Nurs Res. 2006 May-Jun;55(3):149-6016708039
PubMed ID
17625474 View in PubMed
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456 records – page 1 of 46.