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[After the fifth year: home nursing--stagnation or development].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236659
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 Aug 29;73(14):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-1986

Analgesic prescribing patterns in Norwegian nursing homes from 2000 to 2011: trend analyses of four data samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276993
Source
Age Ageing. 2016 Jan;45(1):54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Reidun Sandvik
Geir Selbaek
Oyvind Kirkevold
Dag Aarsland
Bettina Sandgathe Husebo
Source
Age Ageing. 2016 Jan;45(1):54-60
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - therapeutic use
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cognition
Dementia - psychology
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Nursing Homes - trends
Observational Studies as Topic
Odds Ratio
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - trends
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Time Factors
Abstract
the analgesic drug use has been reported to increase in general in nursing home patients. However, there is insufficient evidence in terms of what agents are used, variations of use over time and to whom these drugs are prescribed.
we investigated the prescribing patterns of scheduled analgesic drugs in Norwegian nursing home patients from 2000 to 2011, with the association to age, gender, cognitive function and type of nursing home unit.
secondary analyses of four study samples (three observational studies and one randomised controlled trial).
nursing home patients included in study samples from 2000 (n = 1,926), 2004 (n = 1,163), 2009 (n = 850) and 2011 (n = 1,858) located in 14 Norwegian counties.
trend analyses of analgesic drug prescriptions. Percentages were described using t-test, ?(2) and Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate logistic regression.
the odds ratio for receiving any pain medication in 2011 compared with 2000 was 2.6 (95% CI 2.23-2.91), this is corresponding to a 65% increase from 34.9 to 57.6%. The paracetamol prescription increased by 113%, from 22.7% in 2000 to 48.4% in 2011. Strong opioids (fentanyl, buprenorphine, morphine, oxycodone) increased from 1.9% in 2000 to 17.9% in 2011 (P
Notes
Comment In: Age Ageing. 2016 Jan;45(1):7-826764389
Erratum In: Age Ageing. 2016 Mar;45(2):32326941355
PubMed ID
26764395 View in PubMed
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An intervention study among elderly people. Methodological and practical experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237422
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1986 Feb;4(1):39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986
Author
C. Hendriksen
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1986 Feb;4(1):39-42
Date
Feb-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Health planning - trends
Home Care Services - trends
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Nursing Homes - trends
Patient Admission - trends
Patient Care Team - trends
Pilot Projects
Abstract
Based on a three years controlled intervention study among elderly subjects, aged 75 years or more and living in their own homes, the methodological and practical experiences achieved through interdisciplinary cooperation is described. The combination of social, medical and psychological interventions within the framework of a clinical controlled trial has documented remarkably favourable consequences for the intervention group. The planning, intervention, work up and publication periods of the study are described in the wish that future necessary intervention studies may be guided to an easier procedure.
PubMed ID
3961308 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial resistance in urinary pathogens among Swedish nursing home residents remains low: a cross-sectional study comparing antimicrobial resistance from 2003 to 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257116
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Pär-Daniel Sundvall
Marie Elm
Ronny Gunnarsson
Sigvard Mölstad
Nils Rodhe
Lars Jonsson
Peter Ulleryd
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care in Southern Älvsborg County, Sven Eriksonsplatsen 4, SE-503 38, Borås, Sweden. par-daniel.sundvall@vgregion.se.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:30
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Resistance, Microbial - physiology
Female
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - urine
Abstract
There are several risk factors for the colonisation, infection and spreading of antibiotic resistant bacteria among elderly residents of nursing homes. An updated estimate of the native prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens among Swedish nursing home residents is needed.
Urine specimens were collected for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing against mecillinam, ampicillin, cefadroxil, trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin and quinolones from the residents of 32 and 22 nursing homes, respectively. The residents were capable of providing a voided urine sample in 2003 and 2012. In 2012 urine specimens were also collected from residents with urinary catheters. Any antibiotic treatment during the previous month was registered in 2003 as well as hospitalisation and any antibiotic treatment during the previous six months in 2012.
The proportion of positive urine cultures was 32% (207/651) in voided urine specimens in 2003, 35% (147/421) in 2012, and 46% (27/59) in urine samples from catheters in 2012. Escherichia coli (E. coli) was the most commonly occurring bacteria.Resistance rates in E. coli (voided urine specimens) in 2012 were; ampicillin 21%, trimethoprim 12%, mecillinam 7.7%, ciprofloxacin 3.4%, cefadroxil 2.6% and nitrofurantoin 0.85%. There were no significant changes in the average resistance rates in E. coli for antibiotics tested 2003-2012.In 2012, two isolates of E. coli produced extended spectrum beta-lactamase enzymes (ESBL) and one with plasmid mediated AmpC production.Any antibiotic treatment during the previous month increased the risk for resistance in E. coli, adjusted for age and gender; for mecillinam with an odds ratio (OR) of 7.1 (2.4-21; p = 0.00049), ampicillin OR 5.2 (2.4-11; p = 0.000036), nalidixic acid OR 4.6 (1.4-16; p = 0.014) and trimethoprim OR 3.9 (1.6-9.2; p = 0.0023). Hospitalisation during the previous six months increased the risk for antibiotic resistance in E. coli to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and any antimicrobial tested, adjusted for age, gender and antibiotic treatments during the previous six months.
The average rates of antimicrobial resistance were low and did not increase between 2003 and 2012 in E. coli urinary isolates among Swedish nursing home residents. Antibiotic treatment during the previous month and hospitalisation during the previous six months predicted higher resistance rates.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24625344 View in PubMed
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Bacteriuria and vitamin D deficiency: a cross sectional study of 385 nursing home residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307477
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2019 12 30; 19(1):381
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-30-2019
Author
Rebeka Arnljots
Egill Snaebjörnsson Arnljots
Jörgen Thorn
Marie Elm
Michael Moore
Pär-Daniel Sundvall
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Research and Development Centre Södra Älvsborg Sweden, Sven Eriksonsplatsen 4, SE-503 38, Borås, Sweden. rebeka.arnljots@vgregion.se.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2019 12 30; 19(1):381
Date
12-30-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteriuria - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinalysis - methods
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Up to half of elderly people at nursing homes have asymptomatic bacteriuria, and concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) are generally low. Vitamin D is a modulator of the immune system and involved in protection of the epithelium in the urinary tract as well. The objective was to determine a possible association between bacteriuria and vitamin D deficiency among elderly people at nursing homes.
Cross-sectional study: Voided urine specimens and blood samples for cultivation and analysis of 25OHD were collected from elderly people at nursing homes in Sweden. Exclusion criteria were: urinary catheter, ongoing antibiotic treatment, incontinence or dementia too severe to provide a voided urine specimen or leave a blood sample, unwillingness to participate or terminal illness. Urine cultures and serum 25OHD concentrations were outcome measures and the association of bacteriuria with vitamin D deficiency was determined by logistic regression.
Twenty-two nursing homes participated and 385 of 901elderly people provided voided urine specimens and blood samples. The mean age was 87 (SD 6.7), 69% women, 19% received vitamin D supplement, 13% had diabetes mellitus, and 54% were diagnosed with dementia. There was significant growth of potentially pathogenic bacteria in 32% (123/385) of voided urine specimens. Escherichia coli were present in 83% of positive urine cultures. The mean concentration of 25OHD in serum was 35?nmol/L (SD 21). Thirty-seven per cent (143/385) had 25OHD?
Notes
CommentIn: J Urol. 2020 Sep;204(3):595 PMID 32603267
PubMed ID
31888514 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1989;2(1):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D H Rapelje
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1989;2(1):18-24
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Facility Design and Construction
Health facilities
Health Facility Environment
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Nursing Homes - trends
Ontario
Abstract
After two years of design research, the near-term goal of the Senior Citizens Department, Regional Niagara, was to build innovative homes to address the issues and programs the studies revealed. The long-term objective was to build homes that would start to change the public perception of long-term care facilities. Featuring a "Town Square", the home comprises five houses of 20 beds, each providing a different level of care. Corridors are a unique design, and each house has its own dining room facilities and activity room. A central Day Care lounge features dining room facilities for family and friends. The Department hopes the overall design will help to break down the stereotype image of long-term care design, and provide a suitable environment for the mentally and physically frail, as well as ambulatory residents.
PubMed ID
10292209 View in PubMed
Less detail

European models of long-term care in the home and community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75349
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1995;25(3):455-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B J Coleman
Author Affiliation
Center on Elderly People Living Alone, AARP Public Policy Institute, Washington DC 20049, USA.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1995;25(3):455-74
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community Health Services - utilization
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Forecasting
Frail Elderly
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Home Care Services - utilization
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Institutionalization
Long-Term Care - trends
Nursing Homes - trends
Population Growth
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Abstract
In the 1980s, faced with a rapidly increasing elderly population and soaring costs of health and long-term care services, many European governments began to reexamine fiscal policies that often encouraged institutionalization of frail and dependent elders. A number of these countries have now turned to new models of home and community-based care. This report describes home care policies that serve the needs of frail elders in Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Great Britain, with special attention to experimental projects that have tested varying approaches for providing high quality, low-cost care in the home and in the community. The central governments in these countries have developed long-term care systems that improve quality of care, ensure more efficient delivery of services, and control or lower costs. They have (1) discouraged the building of additional nursing homes and instead supported the development and expansion of a range of housing alternatives; (2) shifted greater responsibility to local governments for delivering long-term care services, bringing those services closer to those who need them; (3) developed care management techniques that enable care providers to better target appropriate services to each elderly client; and (4) provided incentives for different types of care providers to coordinate their work, resulting in improved service delivery and greater client satisfaction.
PubMed ID
7591375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation research in care of the elderly. Some Swedish experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237423
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1986 Feb;4(1):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986
Author
M. Thorslund
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1986 Feb;4(1):33-8
Date
Feb-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Facility Design and Construction - trends
Health planning - trends
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Nursing Homes - trends
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - trends
Patient Admission - trends
Research
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
Research projects in order to evaluate social and health care programmes are unusual in Sweden. Evaluation studies have had little or no discernible effect on the planning of services for the elderly which is largely the product of convention rather than rational thinking. It is difficult to carry out evaluation studies in a field that is rapidly changing. The variations in elderly care between different areas, between institutions and over time makes it difficult to devise general methods of evaluation. Of five recent and current Swedish studies two are treating innovations inside institutions, two deal with innovations outside institutions and one is a relocation study. One thing common to these studies is that they are administered by university departments. However, evaluation is too important to be a matter just for university disciplines. We should also encourage local initiatives to start more evaluation of 'their' interventions. It will then be a task for more centrally placed researchers to educate and guide the administrators and representatives from other areas in what respects the result of a local study can be generalized.
PubMed ID
3961307 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fall risk-increasing drugs and falls: a cross-sectional study among elderly patients in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257113
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Veronica Milos
Åsa Bondesson
Martina Magnusson
Ulf Jakobsson
Tommy Westerlund
Patrik Midlöv
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. veronica.milos@med.lu.se.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2014;14:40
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Opioid - adverse effects
Anti-Anxiety Agents - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes - trends
Primary Health Care - methods - trends
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Falls are the most common cause of injuries and hospital admissions in the elderly. The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare has created a list of drugs considered to increase the fall risk (FRIDs) and drugs that might cause/worsen orthostatism (ODs). This cross-sectional study was aimed to assess FRIDs and their correlation with falls in a sample of 369 community-dwelling and nursing home patients aged =75 years and who were using a multi-dose drug dispensing system.
Data were collected from the patients' electronic medication lists. Retrospective data on reported falls during the previous three months and severe falls during the previous 12 months were collected. Primary outcome measures were incidence of falls as well as numbers of FRIDs and ODs in fallers and non-fallers.
The studied sample had a high incidence of both reported falls (29%) and severe falls (17%). Patients were dispensed a mean of 2.2 (SD 1.5) FRIDs and 2.0 (SD 1.6) ODs. Fallers used on average more FRIDs. Severe falls were more common in nursing homes patients. More women than men experienced severe falls. There were positive associations between number of FRIDs and the total number of drugs (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24674152 View in PubMed
Less detail

Feeling confined: a pilot study of the lived experience for persons with dementia residing on a locked unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178802
Source
Perspectives. 2004;28(1):25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

23 records – page 1 of 3.