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The adoption of high involvement work practices in Canadian nursing homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165874
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2007;20(1):16-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kent V Rondeau
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. kent.rondeau@ualberta.ca
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2007;20(1):16-26
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Professional Practice
Abstract
The objective of the research is to assess the degree of adoption of high-involvement nursing work practices in long-term care organizations. It seeks to determine the organizational and workplace factors that are associated with the uptake/adoption of ten selected human resource high-involvement employee work practices.
A survey questionnaire was sent to 300 long-term care organizations (nursing homes) in western Canada. Results from 125 nursing home establishments (43 percent response rate) are reported herein.
Of the ten high-involvement nursing work practices examined, employee suggestion and recognition systems are the most widely adopted by homes in the sample, while shared governance and incentive/merit-base pay are used by a small minority of establishments.
The uptake of high-involvement nursing work practices is not adopted in a haphazard fashion. Their uptake is variously associated with a number of establishment and workplace factors, including the presence of a supportive and enabling workplace culture.
The objective of this research is to examine the extent and degree of adoption of high involvement work practices in a sample of long-term care establishments operating in the four provinces of western Canada.
PubMed ID
20690472 View in PubMed
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Advance care planning in Norwegian nursing homes - limited awareness of the residents' preferences and values? A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307549
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2019 12 23; 19(1):363
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-23-2019
Author
Lisbeth Thoresen
Reidar Pedersen
Lillian Lillemoen
Elisabeth Gjerberg
Reidun Førde
Author Affiliation
Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Harald Schjelderups hus Forskningsveien 3a/2b, Post Box 1089, 0373, Oslo, Norway. lisbeth.thoresen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2019 12 23; 19(1):363
Date
12-23-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Advance Care Planning - organization & administration
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Personnel - standards
Humans
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Physicians - standards
Qualitative Research
Abstract
52% of all deaths in Norway occur in nursing homes. Still advance care planning (ACP) is scarce and heterogeneous. To improve the implementation and practice of ACP in nursing homes, knowledge about health care professionals' views on ACP is vital. The objective of this study is to explore nurses and physicians' aims and experiences with carrying out ACP in nursing homes.
Semi-structured group interviews were conducted with 20 health care professionals, recruited from nursing homes where ACP was performed regularly. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.
The primary aim of the nursing home professionals when doing ACP in nursing homes were to build alliances with next of kin to avoid misunderstandings and future conflicts. Two main experiences with ACP were described: i) due to the sensitivity of ACP issues, it was important to balance directness with being sensitive, and ii) when the physicians raised questions concerning future medical treatment, the answers from residents as well as next of kin were often hesitant and unclear.
Our study add insights into how ACP is practiced in nursing homes and the professionals' agenda. A focus on medical issues and achieving consensus with next of kin may result in lack of involvement of the residents and limited awareness of the residents' needs. Interdisciplinary approaches, ACP-training and tailored guidelines may improve the implementation and practice of ACP.
PubMed ID
31870302 View in PubMed
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All the things I have - handling one's material room in old age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268433
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Dec;31:110-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Asa Larsson Ranada
Jan-Erik Hagberg
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Dec;31:110-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Data Collection
Emotions - physiology
Family - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Household Articles
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Ownership
Social Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
The article explores how old people who live in their ordinary home, reason and act regarding their 'material room' (technical objects, such as household appliances, communication tools and things, such as furniture, personal belongings, gadgets, books, paintings, and memorabilia). The interest is in how they, as a consequence of their aging, look at acquiring new objects and phasing out older objects from the home. This is a broader approach than in most other studies of how old people relate to materiality in which attention is mostly paid either to adjustments to the physical environment or to the importance of personal possessions. In the latter cases, the focus is on downsizing processes (e.g. household disbandment or casser maison) in connection with a move to smaller accommodation or to a nursing home. The article is based on a study in which thirteen older people (median age 87), living in a Swedish town of medium size were interviewed (2012) for a third time. The questions concerned the need and desire for new objects, replacement of broken objects, sorting out the home or elsewhere, most cherished possessions, and the role of family members such as children and grandchildren. The results reveal the complexity of how one handles the material room. Most evident is the participants' reluctance to acquire new objects or even to replace broken things. Nearly all of them had considered, but few had started, a process of sorting out objects. These standpoints in combination resulted in a relatively intact material room, which was motivated by an ambition to simplify daily life or to facilitate the approaching dissolution of the home. Some objects of special value and other cherished objects materialized the connections between generations within a family. Some participants wanted to spare their children the burden of having to decide on what to do with their possessions. Others (mostly men), on the contrary, relied on their children to do the sorting out after they had died.
PubMed ID
25456628 View in PubMed
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Alzheimer's activities. Residents set their own pace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221061
Source
Contemp Longterm Care. 1993 Jun;16(6):72, 74, 115
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993

An interdisciplinary knowledge translation intervention in long-term care: study protocol for the vitamin D and osteoporosis study (ViDOS) pilot cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124096
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Courtney C Kennedy
George Ioannidis
Lora M Giangregorio
Jonathan D Adachi
Lehana Thabane
Suzanne N Morin
Richard G Crilly
Sharon Marr
Robert G Josse
Lynne Lohfeld
Laura E Pickard
Susanne King
Mary-Lou van der Horst
Glenda Campbell
Jackie Stroud
Lisa Dolovich
Anna M Sawka
Ravi Jain
Lynn Nash
Alexandra Papaioannou
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. kennedyc@hhsc.ca
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:48
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Calcium - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Drug Utilization
Fractures, Bone - prevention & control
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Inservice training
Leadership
Long-Term Care - organization & administration
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Ontario
Osteoporosis - prevention & control
Pilot Projects
Reminder Systems
Translational Medical Research - organization & administration
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
Knowledge translation (KT) research in long-term care (LTC) is still in its early stages. This protocol describes the evaluation of a multifaceted, interdisciplinary KT intervention aimed at integrating evidence-based osteoporosis and fracture prevention strategies into LTC care processes.
The Vitamin D and Osteoporosis Study (ViDOS) is underway in 40 LTC homes (n = 19 intervention, n = 21 control) across Ontario, Canada. The primary objectives of this study are to assess the feasibility of delivering the KT intervention, and clinically, to increase the percent of LTC residents prescribed =800 IU of vitamin D daily. Eligibility criteria are LTC homes that are serviced by our partner pharmacy provider and have more than one prescribing physician. The target audience within each LTC home is the Professional Advisory Committee (PAC), an interdisciplinary team who meets quarterly. The key elements of the intervention are three interactive educational sessions led by an expert opinion leader, action planning using a quality improvement cycle, audit and feedback reports, nominated internal champions, and reminders/point-of-care tools. Control homes do not receive any intervention, however both intervention and control homes received educational materials as part of the Ontario Osteoporosis Strategy. Primary outcomes are feasibility measures (recruitment, retention, attendance at educational sessions, action plan items identified and initiated, internal champions identified, performance reports provided and reviewed), and vitamin D (=800 IU/daily) prescribing at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of residents prescribed calcium supplements and osteoporosis medications, and falls and fractures. Qualitative methods will examine the experience of the LTC team with the KT intervention. Homes are centrally randomized to intervention and control groups in blocks of variable size using a computer generated allocation sequence. Randomization is stratified by home size and profit/nonprofit status. Prescribing data retrieval and analysis are performed by blinded personnel.
Our study will contribute to an improved understanding of the feasibility and acceptability of a multifaceted intervention aimed at translating knowledge to LTC practitioners. Lessons learned from this study will be valuable in guiding future research and understanding the complexities of translating knowledge in LTC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22624776 View in PubMed
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[A question of priority setting: nursing home with goals which collide].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234454
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Nov 20;74(20):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-1987

[A question of resources. Rehabilitation in nursing homes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234854
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Aug 28;74(14):17-23, 28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1987
Author
E. Manin
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Aug 28;74(14):17-23, 28
Date
Aug-28-1987
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Health Resources - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Norway
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Rehabilitation
PubMed ID
3686360 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Arrangement in nursing home threatens nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103170
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Feb 7;90(6):15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1990
Author
E. Grube
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Feb 7;90(6):15
Date
Feb-7-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Humans
Nurses
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Physician Executives
Physicians
PubMed ID
2343395 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aspects of indignity in nursing home residences as experienced by family caregivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268026
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Nov;20(7):748-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Dagfinn Nåden
Arne Rehnsfeldt
Maj-Britt Råholm
Lillemor Lindwall
Synnøve Caspari
Trygve Aasgaard
Åshild Slettebø
Berit Sæteren
Bente Høy
Britt Lillestø
Anne Kari Tolo Heggestad
Vibeke Lohne
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2013 Nov;20(7):748-61
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Caregivers - psychology
Denmark
Female
Geriatric Nursing - ethics
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Personhood
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The overall purpose of this cross-country Nordic study was to gain further knowledge about maintaining and promoting dignity in nursing home residents. The purpose of this article is to present results pertaining to the following question: How is nursing home residents' dignity maintained, promoted or deprived from the perspective of family caregivers? In this article, we focus only on indignity in care. This study took place at six different nursing home residences in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Data collection methods in this part of this study consisted of individual research interviews. Altogether, the sample consisted of 28 family caregivers of nursing home residents. The empirical material was interpreted using a hermeneutical approach. The overall theme that emerged was as follows: 'A feeling of being abandoned'. The sub-themes are designated as follows: deprived of the feeling of belonging, deprived of dignity due to acts of omission, deprived of confirmation, deprived of dignity due to physical humiliation, deprived of dignity due to psychological humiliation and deprived of parts of life.
PubMed ID
23462504 View in PubMed
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Assessing the congruence of nursing models with organizational culture: a quality improvement perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213601
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 1996 Jan;10(2):41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
D. Goodridge
B. Hack
Author Affiliation
Riverview Health Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 1996 Jan;10(2):41-8
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Models, Nursing
Nursing Homes - organization & administration - standards
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - standards
Organizational Culture
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Model-based practice was identified by the Nursing Department at Riverview Health Centre, a 320-bed long-term care facility located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, as having the potential to enhance care quality significantly. To achieve real impact in the clinical setting, however, the model selected would need to reflect closely the culture and values of the department. It was decided to explore these phenomena using cross-method triangulation involving a cultural assessment survey (the Nursing Unit Cultural Assessment Tool) and focus groups. Patient comfort and empathy emerged consistently as core values for staff. Greater appreciation of the depth and complexity of the nursing department culture and values has provided invaluable direction vis-à-vis conceptual model selection.
PubMed ID
8562988 View in PubMed
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197 records – page 1 of 20.