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1992 Ontario Survey of Public Health Nurses: perceptions of roles and activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218313
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L W Chambers
J. Underwood
T. Halbert
C A Woodward
J. Heale
S. Isaacs
Author Affiliation
Hamilton-Wentworth Department of Public Health Services, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Institutional Relations
Health promotion
Humans
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
A survey of public health nurses (PHNs) who work in official public health units in Ontario was undertaken to determine whether their perceptions of their roles and activities concurred with a 1990 Canadian Public Health Association report which describes the roles and qualifications of public health nursing in Canada. The survey questionnaire was completed by 1,849 PHNs in all 42 public health units (response rate = 85%). About one tenth of the PHNs reported no activity as a caregiver/service provider. Most PHNs reported being active in the roles of educator/consultant, social marketer, and facilitator/communicator/collaborator. The community developer, policy formulator, research/evaluator, and resource manager/planner/coordinator roles were less frequently performed, however, increased activities in such roles were expected in the future. Nurses said that they needed further preparation to perform the latter roles. These results have implications for deployment of PHNs as Ontario's health system shifts to community health and health promotion.
PubMed ID
7922961 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and quality in the nursing documentation of pressure ulcers: a comparison of record content and patient examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77064
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gunningberg Lena
Ehrenberg Anna
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. lena.gunningberg@akademiska.se
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Documentation - standards
Female
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Records - standards
Observer Variation
Physical Examination - nursing - standards
Practice Guidelines
Pressure Ulcer - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy and describe the quality of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers in a hospital care setting. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was used comparing retrospective audits of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers to previous physical examinations of patients. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: All inpatient records (n = 413) from February 5, 2002, at the surgical/orthopedic (n = 144), medical (n = 182), and geriatric (n = 87) departments of one Swedish University hospital. INSTRUMENTS: The European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel data collection form and the Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation. METHODS: All 413 records were reviewed for presence of notes on pressure ulcers; the findings were compared with the previous examination of patients' skin condition. Records with notes on pressure ulcers (n = 59) were audited using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation instruments. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers obtained by audit of patient records was 14.3% compared to 33.3% when the patients' skin was examined. The lack of accuracy was most evident in the documentation of grade 1 pressure ulcers. The quality of the nursing documentation of pressure ulcer (n = 59) was generally poor. CONCLUSIONS: Patient records did not present valid and reliable data about pressure ulcers. There is a need for guidelines to support the care planning process and facilitate the use of research-based knowledge in clinical practice. More attention must be focused on the quality of clinical data to make proper use of electronic patient records in the future.
PubMed ID
15867708 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71494
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Ehrenberg
M. Ehnfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. aeh@du.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Education, Nursing, Continuing - standards
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inservice Training - standards
Male
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Homes
Nursing Process - standards
Nursing Records - standards
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions. Data from patient records will increasingly be used for care planning, quality assessment, research, health planning and allocation of resources. Knowledge about the accuracy of such secondary data, however, is limited and only a few studies have been conducted on the accuracy of nursing recording. The aim of this study was to analyse the concordance between the nursing documentation in nursing homes and descriptions of some specific problems of nurses and patients. Comparisons were made between wards where nurses had received training in structured recording based on the nursing process (study group) and wards where no intervention had taken place (reference group). Data were collected from the patient records of randomly selected nursing home residents (n=85). The methods used were audits of patient records and structured interviews with residents and nurses. The study revealed considerable deficiencies in the accuracy of the patient records when the records were compared with the reports from nurses and residents. The overall agreement between the interview data from nurses and from the patient records was low. Concordance was better in the study group as compared with the reference group in which the recorded data were structured only following chronological order. The study unequivocally demonstrates that there are major limitations in using records as a data source for the evaluation, planning and development of care.
PubMed ID
12453171 View in PubMed
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Achieving the 'perfect handoff' in patient transfers: building teamwork and trust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122387
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2012 Jul;20(5):592-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Diana Clarke
Kim Werestiuk
Andrea Schoffner
Judy Gerard
Katie Swan
Bobbi Jackson
Betty Steeves
Shelley Probizanski
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. diana_clarke@umanitoba.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2012 Jul;20(5):592-8
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Checklist
Communication
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Manitoba
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient care team
Patient transfer
Program Development
Trust
Abstract
To use the philosophy and methodology of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) in the investigation of unit to unit transfers to determine aspects which are working well and should be incorporated into standard practice.
Handoffs can result in threats to patient safety and an atmosphere of distrust and blaming among staff can be engendered. As the majority of handoffs go well, an alternative is to build on successful handoffs.
The AI methodology was used to discover what was currently working well in unit to unit transfers. The data from semi-structured interviews that were conducted with staff, patients, and family informed structural process improvements.
Themes extracted from the interviews focused on the situational variables necessary for the perfect transfer, the mode and content of transfer-related communication, and important factors in communication with the patient and family.
This project was successful in demonstrating the usefulness of AI as both a quality improvement methodology and a strategy to build trust among key stakeholders.
Giving staff members the opportunity to contribute positively to process improvements and share their ideas for innovation has the potential to highlight expertise and everyday accomplishments enhancing morale and reducing conflict.
PubMed ID
22823214 View in PubMed
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ACTION: application and extension of the GENESIS community analysis model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211809
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
C K Russell
D M Gregory
D. Wotton
E. Mordoch
M M Counts
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Tennessee, Memphis 38163, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing
Cultural Diversity
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Models, Nursing
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
United States
Urban health
Abstract
GENESIS (General Ethnographic and Nursing Evaluation Studies In the State) is a tested and proven community analysis strategy that integrates ethnographic and epidemiologic data to arrive at a comprehensive, holistic description of the health of a community and its residents. Communities analyzed in most project GENESIS studies have been rural or semirural. ACTION (Assessing Communities Together in the Identification Of Needs) is an extension of the GENESIS community analysis model that was developed to meet the unique needs of community-level research and analysis in an urban, multicultural setting. Significant differences in the context in which the ACTION projects took place necessitated extensions in specific components of the GENESIS model. Application of the GENESIS model by the ACTION team is described. Based on the experiences with ACTION, recommendations are offered for future urban, multicultural community analysis projects.
PubMed ID
8677234 View in PubMed
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Actuarial assessment of violence risk in hospital-based partner assault clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152826
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
N Zoe Hilton
Grant T Harris
Norah Holder
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Mental Health Centre Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. zhilton@mhcp.on.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis - methods - standards
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Recurrence
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stalking - psychology
Abstract
Hospital-based partner assault clinics are a relatively recent addition to the community response to partner violence. In this study, 66% of 111 women attending hospital clinics for partner assault were physically injured and 43% reported death threats. Few concurrently used other services (shelters or police) and most relied on female friends and relatives for help. Many participants who currently lived with the perpetrator were contemplating leaving but only a third had made plans to do so. Participants faced an unusually high risk of future assault, according to both victim interview using the ODARA actuarial risk assessment and their own perceptions. Findings imply an important role for partner assault clinics and the feasibility of the victim service sector's using the same actuarial risk assessments as the criminal justice system.
PubMed ID
19186785 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71271
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Lisbeth Rehnström
Lennart Christensson
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Mitra Unosson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Care - psychology - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods - standards
Patient satisfaction
Perioperative Nursing - standards
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surgical Procedures, Operative - nursing - psychology
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
The aim of this study was to adapt the instrument 'Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients' to Swedish conditions as a measure of patients' satisfaction, as well as estimating its reliability and validity. Following a pilot test, discussions in the author group, testing for readability among patients and judgement of content validity by a panel of experts, the final version was reduced to 72 items focusing on good caring. The refined instrument was assessed for internal consistency in 447 surgical in-patients, for 2 week test-retest reliability in 100 patients and subjected to orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation, followed by second-order factor analysis. The internal consistency item-item correlation coefficient ranged from 0.15 to 0.91, correlation between each item and the total scale was >or=0.30 for 70 items, Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the final scale was 0.79 and test-retest reliability was 0.75. An orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the final 71 items and the 15 first-order factors with eigenvalues >or=1 explained 66% of the total variance. A second-order factor analysis of these 15 factors as items resulted in a seven-factor solution. The total variance explained by the seven factors was 79%. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the seven factors ranged between 0.32 and 0.95. The instrument seems reliable and valid to assess the patients' satisfaction with what happened during their hospital stay. To confirm the factor structure and improve factor consistency additional development and testing is suggested.
PubMed ID
12919467 View in PubMed
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Adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a survey of diagnosis and treatment practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139518
Source
J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2010 Nov;22(11):593-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Kathleen C Knutson
Maureen O'Malley
Author Affiliation
Anchorage Medical and Surgical Clinic, Anchorage, Alaska. k2c2knutson@ak.net
Source
J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2010 Nov;22(11):593-601
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Benchmarking
Comorbidity
Diagnostic Errors - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Practice Patterns - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To review the literature to ascertain best practices in the diagnosis and treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to determine the current beliefs and practices of nurse practitioners (NPs) regarding adult ADHD.
Licensed NPs (n= 260) responded to a questionnaire that inquired about numbers of patients seen with ADHD and about current diagnostic and treatment methods. Diagnostic confidence and referral patterns were also surveyed. Best practices were identified through a review of current and classic nursing, medical, and psychological literature on ADHD.
The results of the survey showed that most NPs believe that adult ADHD exists, although the majority diagnose and treat this condition infrequently. Psychiatric NPs were an exception.
NPs are diagnosing and treating adult ADHD at levels far below expected based on population prevalence data. While those NPs who suspected ADHD were using appropriate diagnostic and treatment methods, more education is warranted to increase confidence for a greater number of nonpsychiatric NPs to improve targeted diagnosis and treatment for this condition.
PubMed ID
21054633 View in PubMed
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Advanced home care: patients' opinions on quality compared with those of family members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71155
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Feb;13(2):226-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Bodil Wilde Larsson
Gerry Larsson
Solveig Rizell Carlson
Author Affiliation
Division for Health and Care, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. bodil.wilde@kau.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2004 Feb;13(2):226-33
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Nursing - standards
Comparative Study
Family - psychology
Female
Home Care Services - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Nursing Evaluation Research
Palliative Care - psychology - standards
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Advanced medical care in the patient's home setting is becoming more common. Many of the patients who receive this kind of care have severe illnesses and are unable to respond to questions about the quality of care. The research question was: are the patients' opinions congruent with those of family members? AIM: To explore and compare the relationship between patients' perception of the quality of care and close family members' perception of this care as well as their perception of the patients' perception. METHODS: Sixty-seven patients receiving advanced home care, 82 family members (54 matched patient + family member pairs) participated. Data were collected using a short version of the quality from the patient's perspective questionnaire modified to advanced home care. RESULTS: A high degree of perceptual congruence was found between patients and their family members. The similarity was also high between family members' own opinion and their appraisal of how the patient perceived the care. A subgroup of family members who met the patient once a week or less often deviated from this pattern. CONCLUSION: Patients' views on the quality of care are congruent with the opinions of family members if they meet every day (live together) and share the same everyday and care-related experiences. The results can be understood in the light of empathic accuracy theory. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings of this study have important implications for clinical nursing practice. Family members' perception of the quality of care may be a valuable data source for nurses in the case of advanced home care if the patient and family member share the same everyday, care-related experiences, otherwise family members' perception tend to be more critical than those of the patients themselves.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2004 Oct;13(7):906-7; discussion 90815361165
PubMed ID
14723675 View in PubMed
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591 records – page 1 of 60.