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Actuarial assessment of violence risk in hospital-based partner assault clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152826
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
N Zoe Hilton
Grant T Harris
Norah Holder
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Mental Health Centre Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. zhilton@mhcp.on.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis - methods - standards
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Recurrence
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stalking - psychology
Abstract
Hospital-based partner assault clinics are a relatively recent addition to the community response to partner violence. In this study, 66% of 111 women attending hospital clinics for partner assault were physically injured and 43% reported death threats. Few concurrently used other services (shelters or police) and most relied on female friends and relatives for help. Many participants who currently lived with the perpetrator were contemplating leaving but only a third had made plans to do so. Participants faced an unusually high risk of future assault, according to both victim interview using the ODARA actuarial risk assessment and their own perceptions. Findings imply an important role for partner assault clinics and the feasibility of the victim service sector's using the same actuarial risk assessments as the criminal justice system.
PubMed ID
19186785 View in PubMed
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Ambulance nursing assessment. Part two.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185509
Source
Emerg Nurse. 2003 Apr;11(1):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003

An abilities assessment instrument for elderly persons with cognitive impairment: psychometric properties and clinical utility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204345
Source
J Nurs Meas. 1998;6(1):35-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
P. Dawson
D L Wells
D. Reid
S. Sidani
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
J Nurs Meas. 1998;6(1):35-54
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Dementia - diagnosis - nursing
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Male
Nursing Assessment - methods
Observer Variation
Ontario
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In this article the psychometric properties of an Abilities Assessment Instrument (AAI), developed to assess the self-care, social, interactional and interpretive abilities of older people with cognitive impairment (CI) related to dementia, are described. The sample consisted of 112 institutionalized older men with CI and 60 institutionalized older men without CI. The psychometric evaluation of the AAI indicated that: (a) it is reliable in terms of test-retest (Pearson's r range .93-.99), interrater (Pearson's r range .95- .99), and internal consistency evaluations (Cronbach's alpha .90-.98), as well as through confirmatory factor analysis; and (b) that it is valid with respect to content validity (CVI 87.3%), concurrent validity (Pearson's r correlations ranging from -.67-.80 on the London Psychogeriatric Rating Scale [LPRS], and from -.76-.85 on the Functional Assessment Stages Scale [FAST]), and construct validity with significant differences between subjects with and without CI (t values ranging from 5.13-9.30). The AAI is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used to provide assessment data.
PubMed ID
9769610 View in PubMed
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An educational intervention for district nurses: use of electronic records in leg ulcer management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78585
Source
J Wound Care. 2007 Jan;16(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lagerin A.
Nilsson G.
Törnkvist L.
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Centre for Family and Community Medicine (CeFAM), Huddinge, Sweden. Annica.Lagerin@sll.se
Source
J Wound Care. 2007 Jan;16(1):29-32
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Competence - standards
Data Collection - methods
Documentation
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Leg Ulcer - nursing - ultrasonography
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - utilization
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Audit - methods
Nursing Education Research - methods
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods
Nursing Records
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Skin Care - nursing
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate district nurses' management of leg ulcer patients and the effects of an in-service education programme led by district nurses as local educators at primary health-care centres. METHOD: Data were collected from electronic patient records (EPRs), both before and after the educational intervention. Nineteen district nurses undertook a one-day course focusing on four themes: Doppler assessment and measurement of ankle brachial pressure index; compression treatment; patient education; nursing documentation. Fourteen acted as in-service educators; 12 educators completed the intervention.The EPRs were scrutinised with an audit tool. RESULTS: The documentation on the selected key areas for the management of patients with leg ulcers was generally sparse, although the educational intervention resulted in statistically significant effects on documentation in three areas. CONCLUSION: Further improvements in care are necessary, as are qualitative and quantitative studies to explore the large discrepancies between guidelines and everyday clinical practice in this field.
PubMed ID
17334143 View in PubMed
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An examination of psychometric properties of the mini-mental state examination and the standardized mini-mental state examination: implications for clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196623
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 2000 Nov;13(4):209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
V C Pangman
J. Sloan
L. Guse
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Verna_Pangman@umanitoba.ca
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 2000 Nov;13(4):209-13
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - nursing
Cross-Over Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Manitoba
Neuropsychological Tests
Nursing Assessment - methods
Psychometrics
Reference Standards
Abstract
The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), as developed by Folstein, Folstein, and McHugh (1975), is the most widely used of cognitive screening tools. An examination of the psychometric properties of the MMSE seems warranted because the accurate and comprehensive assessment of mental status can yield profound implications for the quality of life of cognitively impaired older adults (Danner, Beck, Heacock, & Modlin, 1993). In clinical practice, nurses must not only use a valid and reliable screening tool for assessing cognitive impairment, but they must also assess the physical disabilities that may affect client performance and, hence, the cognitive impairment score. The purpose of this study is to examine the psychometric properties of the MMSE in comparison to a more standardized tool and to identify implications of the tool for clinical practice.
PubMed ID
11078787 View in PubMed
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An exploration and description of student midwives' experiences in offering continuous labour support to women/couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94025
Source
Midwifery. 2008 Dec;24(4):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Thorstensson Stina
Nissen Eva
Ekström Anette
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden. stina.thorstensson@his.se
Source
Midwifery. 2008 Dec;24(4):451-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delivery, Obstetric - nursing
Female
Humans
Male
Midwifery - education
Mothers - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - methods
Pregnancy
Social Support
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Writing
Abstract
AIM: to explore and describe the student midwife's experiences in offering continuous labour support. DESIGN: a qualitative research design was chosen. Each student midwife offered continuous labour support to five women/couples and wrote narratives about each of these occasions. Written narratives from 11 student midwives were analysed using qualitative content analysis. FINDINGS: when student midwives offer continuous labour support to women/couples, they try to establish rapport. When this works, their presence, their sense of confidence and their ability to offer reassurance increase. If establishing rapport does not work, students experience a sense of powerlessness, a need for reassurance and a lack of confidence. KEY CONCLUSIONS: offering continuous labour support to women and/or their partners made the students aware of the importance of establishing rapport, and it made them realise the impact that their mere presence in the room could have. The students had a need for reassurance which could hamper their efforts to establish rapport. Experiencing a lack of confidence made students focus more strongly on their clinical skills and on their perceived role as a student midwife. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: this study can initiate discussions about how student midwives learn to be supportive, as well as about the role models that students encounter during their clinical training in Sweden.
PubMed ID
17881100 View in PubMed
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Are patients with or at risk of pressure ulcers allocated appropriate prevention measures?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70760
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2005 Apr;11(2):58-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Lena Gunningberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. lena.gunningberg@akademiska.se
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2005 Apr;11(2):58-67
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bedding and Linens - utilization
Beds - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Hospitals, University
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Evaluation Research
Orthotic Devices - utilization
Pressure Ulcer - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care - standards
Resource Allocation - standards
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aims of the study were to investigate the risk for and prevalence of pressure ulcers in different medical care groups, to discover if patients at risk for or with pressure ulcers are allocated appropriate pressure ulcer preventions and to investigate which variables are associated with appropriate pressure ulcer preventions. A cross-sectional survey design was used and followed the methodology developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. A total of 612 patients participated in the study. The prevalence of pressure ulcers was greatest in geriatric care, followed by intensive care, acute care and neurological care. The majority of patients at risk for or with pressure ulcers did not receive appropriate preventative measures, either while they were in bed or in a chair. Significant variables associated with appropriate preventions in bed were intensive care, geriatric care, a low Braden score, a low score in the subscale activity and a long hospital stay.
PubMed ID
15752320 View in PubMed
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Assessing cognitive impairment in older people: the Watson clock drawing test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178420
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2004 Aug;9(8):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Christopher Armstrong Esther
Brad Hagen
Mark Sandilands
Christine Smith
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Br J Community Nurs. 2004 Aug;9(8):350-5
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - nursing
Community Health Nursing - methods
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Nursing Assessment - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
A non-random sample of 331 community-based clients aged 75 years and over, who were being cared for at home, were involved in a longitudinal study to assess cognitive impairment (CI). The clock drawing test (CDT) using the Watson et al (1993) scoring protocol was used to determine its utility as a tool for community nurses to assess CI. In the first phase of the study, 294 CDTs were used in analysis and 58.8% (n = 172) of participants were cognitively impaired. Subsequent assessments at 9 months and 18 months using both the CDT and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) confirmed the high initial level of cognitive impairment among the sample. Over the course of the study 37 participants who had high CDT scores were admitted to institutional care and their cognitive status continued to decline. Among those who remained in the community, the percentage with some degree of cognitive impairment remained high, and over the course of the study there was a significant linear decline in the mean MMSE score. The CDT takes less time to administer than the MMSE and appears to be a more sensitive tool for detecting early changes in cognition. The CDT could therefore be useful as an initial assessment tool by community mental health nurses to help facilitate early intervention for older clients who are beginning to experience cognitive changes.
PubMed ID
15365475 View in PubMed
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Assessing stomatitis: refinement of the Western Consortium for Cancer Nursing Research (WCCNR) stomatitis staging system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203964
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1998 Aug;8(3):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1998 Aug;8(3):160-5
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Discriminant Analysis
Humans
Neoplasms - complications
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Evaluation Research
Oncology Nursing
Severity of Illness Index
Societies, Nursing
Stomatitis - classification - nursing - pathology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to refine the Western Consortium for Cancer Nursing Research (WCCNR) stomatitis staging system. Fifty-six adult cancer patients were accrued. Using all eight descriptors, 96.4% of the participants were correctly staged. Using only lesions, colour and bleeding, however, 92.9% of the cases were correctly staged. Based on the findings of this study, the WCCNR stomatitis staging system has been shortened to include only lesions, colour and bleeding.
PubMed ID
9814153 View in PubMed
Less detail

155 records – page 1 of 16.