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621 records – page 1 of 63.

Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1986 Oct;24(10):28-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986
Author
S P Hirst
J. Miller
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1986 Oct;24(10):28-34
Date
Oct-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude
Canada
Counseling
Elder Abuse
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Care
Parent-Child Relations
PubMed ID
3640822 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 1985 Feb;81(2):36-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
M M Ross
P A Ross
M. Ross-Carson
Source
Can Nurse. 1985 Feb;81(2):36-9
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Elder Abuse
Female
Humans
Male
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Process
PubMed ID
3844952 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Sep;96(8):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
M. Fletcher
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Sep;96(8):18-22
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Elder Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control
Humans
Negotiating
Nursing Assessment
PubMed ID
11865607 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and quality in the nursing documentation of pressure ulcers: a comparison of record content and patient examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77064
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gunningberg Lena
Ehrenberg Anna
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. lena.gunningberg@akademiska.se
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Documentation - standards
Female
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Records - standards
Observer Variation
Physical Examination - nursing - standards
Practice Guidelines
Pressure Ulcer - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy and describe the quality of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers in a hospital care setting. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was used comparing retrospective audits of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers to previous physical examinations of patients. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: All inpatient records (n = 413) from February 5, 2002, at the surgical/orthopedic (n = 144), medical (n = 182), and geriatric (n = 87) departments of one Swedish University hospital. INSTRUMENTS: The European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel data collection form and the Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation. METHODS: All 413 records were reviewed for presence of notes on pressure ulcers; the findings were compared with the previous examination of patients' skin condition. Records with notes on pressure ulcers (n = 59) were audited using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation instruments. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers obtained by audit of patient records was 14.3% compared to 33.3% when the patients' skin was examined. The lack of accuracy was most evident in the documentation of grade 1 pressure ulcers. The quality of the nursing documentation of pressure ulcer (n = 59) was generally poor. CONCLUSIONS: Patient records did not present valid and reliable data about pressure ulcers. There is a need for guidelines to support the care planning process and facilitate the use of research-based knowledge in clinical practice. More attention must be focused on the quality of clinical data to make proper use of electronic patient records in the future.
PubMed ID
15867708 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of parents in measuring body temperature with a tympanic thermometer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176648
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2005 Jan 11;6(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-11-2005
Author
Joan L Robinson
Hsing Jou
Donald W Spady
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Stollery Children's Hospital, 2C3 Walter MacKenzie Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2B7 Canada. jr3@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2005 Jan 11;6(1):3
Date
Jan-11-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta
Body Temperature - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Fever - diagnosis - nursing
Humans
Infant
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation - nursing
Nursing Assessment
Parents
Predictive value of tests
Reference Standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Thermography - instrumentation - standards
Thermometers - standards
Tympanic Membrane - physiology
Abstract
It is now common for parents to measure tympanic temperatures in children. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these measurements.
Parents and then nurses measured the temperature of 60 children with a tympanic thermometer designed for home use (home thermometer). The reference standard was a temperature measured by a nurse with a model of tympanic thermometer commonly used in hospitals (hospital thermometer). A difference of >or= 0.5 degrees C was considered clinically significant. A fever was defined as a temperature >or= 38.5 degrees C.
The mean absolute difference between the readings done by the parent and the nurse with the home thermometer was 0.44 +/- 0.61 degrees C, and 33% of the readings differed by >or= 0.5 degrees C. The mean absolute difference between the readings done by the parent with the home thermometer and the nurse with the hospital thermometer was 0.51 +/- 0.63 degrees C, and 72 % of the readings differed by >or= 0.5 degrees C. Using the home thermometer, parents detected fever with a sensitivity of 76% (95% CI 50-93%), a specificity of 95% (95% CI 84-99%), a positive predictive value of 87% (95% CI 60-98%), and a negative predictive value of 91% (95% CI 79-98 %). In comparing the readings the nurse obtained from the two different tympanic thermometers, the mean absolute difference was 0.24 +/- 0.22 degrees C. Nurses detected fever with a sensitivity of 94% (95 % CI 71-100 %), a specificity of 88% (95% CI 75-96 %), a positive predictive value of 76% (95% CI 53-92%), and a negative predictive value of 97% (95%CI 87-100 %) using the home thermometer. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the three sets of readings was 0.80, and the consistency of readings was not affected by the body temperature.
The readings done by parents with a tympanic thermometer designed for home use differed a clinically significant amount from the reference standard (readings done by nurses with a model of tympanic thermometer commonly used in hospitals) the majority of the time, and parents failed to detect fever about one-quarter of the time. Tympanic readings reported by parents should be interpreted with great caution.
Notes
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Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1990 Jun;29(6):343-52361344
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1993 Aug;21(8):1181-58339584
PubMed ID
15644134 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71494
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Ehrenberg
M. Ehnfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. aeh@du.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Education, Nursing, Continuing - standards
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inservice Training - standards
Male
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Homes
Nursing Process - standards
Nursing Records - standards
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions. Data from patient records will increasingly be used for care planning, quality assessment, research, health planning and allocation of resources. Knowledge about the accuracy of such secondary data, however, is limited and only a few studies have been conducted on the accuracy of nursing recording. The aim of this study was to analyse the concordance between the nursing documentation in nursing homes and descriptions of some specific problems of nurses and patients. Comparisons were made between wards where nurses had received training in structured recording based on the nursing process (study group) and wards where no intervention had taken place (reference group). Data were collected from the patient records of randomly selected nursing home residents (n=85). The methods used were audits of patient records and structured interviews with residents and nurses. The study revealed considerable deficiencies in the accuracy of the patient records when the records were compared with the reports from nurses and residents. The overall agreement between the interview data from nurses and from the patient records was low. Concordance was better in the study group as compared with the reference group in which the recorded data were structured only following chronological order. The study unequivocally demonstrates that there are major limitations in using records as a data source for the evaluation, planning and development of care.
PubMed ID
12453171 View in PubMed
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Accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of leg ulcers reduce prevalence, care time and costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81702
Source
J Wound Care. 2006 Jun;15(6):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Oien R F
Ragnarson Tennvall G.
Author Affiliation
Blekinge Wound Healing Centre, Lyckeby, Sweden. rut.oien@ltblekinge.se
Source
J Wound Care. 2006 Jun;15(6):259-62
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bandages
Community Health Nursing - economics - education
Cost Control
Cost of Illness
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Humans
Leg Ulcer - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - nursing
Male
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Staff - economics - education - psychology
Population Surveillance
Practice Guidelines
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Skin Care - economics - nursing
Sweden - epidemiology
Time and Motion Studies
Workload - economics
Wound Healing
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This long-term follow-up recorded the prevalence, aetiology and treatment of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers, and an estimated nurses' time spent providing care, for the years 1994-2005. METHOD: A questionnaire was sent to all district and community nurses in the county of Blekinge, Sweden, during one week in 1994, 1998, 2004 and 2005. Calculating the costs of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcer care was not a primary aim, but the reduction in prevalence and time spent on wound management suggested it was important to illustrate the economic consequences of these changes over time. RESULTS: Estimated prevalence of hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers reduced from 0.22% in 1994 to 0.15% in 2005. Treatment time decreased from 1.7 hours per patient per week in 1994 to 1.3 hours in 2005. Annual costs of leg and foot ulcer care reduced by SEK 6.96 million in the study area from 1994 to 2005. CONCLUSION: Improved wound management was demonstrated; leg and foot ulcer prevalence and treatment time were reduced. The results could be attributed to an increased interest in leg and foot ulcer care among staff, which was maintained by repeated questionnaires, continuous education, establishment of a wound healing centre in primary care and wound management recommendations from a multidisciplinary group. The improved ulcer care reduced considerably the annual costs of wound management in the area.
PubMed ID
16802562 View in PubMed
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ACTION: application and extension of the GENESIS community analysis model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211809
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
C K Russell
D M Gregory
D. Wotton
E. Mordoch
M M Counts
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Tennessee, Memphis 38163, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing
Cultural Diversity
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Models, Nursing
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
United States
Urban health
Abstract
GENESIS (General Ethnographic and Nursing Evaluation Studies In the State) is a tested and proven community analysis strategy that integrates ethnographic and epidemiologic data to arrive at a comprehensive, holistic description of the health of a community and its residents. Communities analyzed in most project GENESIS studies have been rural or semirural. ACTION (Assessing Communities Together in the Identification Of Needs) is an extension of the GENESIS community analysis model that was developed to meet the unique needs of community-level research and analysis in an urban, multicultural setting. Significant differences in the context in which the ACTION projects took place necessitated extensions in specific components of the GENESIS model. Application of the GENESIS model by the ACTION team is described. Based on the experiences with ACTION, recommendations are offered for future urban, multicultural community analysis projects.
PubMed ID
8677234 View in PubMed
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Actuarial assessment of violence risk in hospital-based partner assault clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152826
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
N Zoe Hilton
Grant T Harris
Norah Holder
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Mental Health Centre Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. zhilton@mhcp.on.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis - methods - standards
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Recurrence
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stalking - psychology
Abstract
Hospital-based partner assault clinics are a relatively recent addition to the community response to partner violence. In this study, 66% of 111 women attending hospital clinics for partner assault were physically injured and 43% reported death threats. Few concurrently used other services (shelters or police) and most relied on female friends and relatives for help. Many participants who currently lived with the perpetrator were contemplating leaving but only a third had made plans to do so. Participants faced an unusually high risk of future assault, according to both victim interview using the ODARA actuarial risk assessment and their own perceptions. Findings imply an important role for partner assault clinics and the feasibility of the victim service sector's using the same actuarial risk assessments as the criminal justice system.
PubMed ID
19186785 View in PubMed
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621 records – page 1 of 63.