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30 records – page 1 of 3.

Caring for teenagers and young adults with cancer: a grounded theory study of network-focused nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140543
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2011 Apr;15(2):152-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Pia Riis Olsen
Ingegerd Harder
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Noerrebrogade 44, Building 5, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. piariisolsen@gmail.com
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2011 Apr;15(2):152-9
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Communication
Denmark
Empathy
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Illness Behavior
Interviews as Topic
Male
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Research
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Oncology Nursing - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Risk assessment
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
Teenagers and young adults (TYAs) are extremely vulnerable and dependant on a supportive social network when diagnosed with cancer and undergoing treatment.
The aim of the study was to generate a substantive theory by exploring processes and strategies of oncology nurses engaged in a nursing programme, which aims at supporting these young patients and their significant others to maintain, establish and strengthen support from their social network during the treatment period.
A grounded theory approach was used and data were generated through interviews, observations, informal conversations and documents. All nurses (7) from a Danish oncology youth unit participated.
'Bridging' was defined as the core concept in nurses' strategies aimed at creating a space for the TYAs' normal growth and development. By strategies of 'Tuning in', 'Framing the situation', 'Navigating towards the goal' and 'Connecting people' the nurses attempted to provide a foundation for the seriously ill TYAs to connect to their normal everyday life.
The study complements existing knowledge of caring for TYAs with cancer, showing how oncology nurses can use their knowledge and position to facilitate involvement of the patients' social network. It contributes with a theoretical framework for clinical practice that offers insight into an unexplored area of nursing. Network-focused nursing is a complex and demanding practice that needs to be addressed by nurses, educators, researchers and health policy makers.
PubMed ID
20864402 View in PubMed
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[Closer team work and new methods better than unit nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238338
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1985 Sep 4;85(36):24-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-1985

[Common goal for nursing services--new forms of team work in Aker Hospital. Interview by Bjørn Arild Ostby].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237017
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 May 2;73(8):27, 33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2-1986

Continuous quality improvement through team supervision supported by continuous self-monitoring of work and systematic patient feedback.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185852
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 May;11(3):177-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Kristiina Hyrkäs
Kristiina Lehti
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, 3rd Floor Clinical Science Building, Office CBS 6-131, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G3 Canada. kristiina.hyrkas@ualberta.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 May;11(3):177-88
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Feedback
Humans
Nursing Audit
Nursing Service, Hospital - standards
Nursing, Supervisory
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Patient satisfaction
Reproducibility of Results
Total Quality Management - methods
Abstract
Evaluation of clinical supervision (CS) and exploration of its effects on the quality of care is a timely topic for research. The current emphasis in nursing is shifting towards continuous quality improvement (CQI), and the integration of this with CS seems to be an interesting challenge. So far the studies have relied mainly on supervisees' self-report data and patients have rarely been involved in research. However, the perspective of CQI requires that patients are involved in the quality improving efforts.
The aim of this study is to describe how CQI was implemented through team supervision and supported by continuous self-monitoring of work and systematic patient feedback.
The team supervision intervention was organized on five wards between 1995 and 1998. The methods of statistical process control and control charts were applied in the study as part of the intervention.
Improvements in both patient satisfaction and the staff's self-monitoring of work were evidenced. A slow and minor upward trend was detected in the control charts and the variation decreased in the assessments. The patients' high and the staff's critical ratings drew nearer towards the end of the study. However, significant differences were found between the wards and not all wards showed improvements. Staff found it difficult to discern the effects of continuous patient satisfaction feedback and self-monitoring.
The findings of the study show that CQI integrated with team supervision improves patient satisfaction and the overall quality of care.
PubMed ID
12694365 View in PubMed
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Developing and sustaining leadership in public health nursing: findings from one British Columbia health authority.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128343
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Dec;25(4):63-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Leslie Mills
Sabrina T Wong
Radhika Bhagat
Donna Quail
Kathy Triolet
Tannis Weber
Author Affiliation
0-5 Program, Infant, Child and Youth, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Dec;25(4):63-75
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Child
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Infant
Internet
Leadership
Male
National Health Programs
Nursing Staff - organization & administration
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Pediatric Nursing - organization & administration
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
To develop clinical leadership among front-line public health nurses (PHNs).
This paper describes a quality improvement process to develop clinical leadership among front-line PHNs. Three activities were undertaken by a working group consisting mainly of front-line staff: engaging PHNs in an online change-readiness questionnaire, administering a survey to clients who had ever used public health services delivered by one Vancouver Community Infant, Child and Youth (ICY) program team and conducting three group interviews with public health providers. The group interviews asked about PHN practice. They were analyzed using thematic content analysis.
This quality improvement project suggests that PHNs (n=70) strongly believed in opportunities for system improvement. Client surveys (n=429) and community partner surveys (n=79) revealed the importance of the PHN role. Group interview data yielded three themes: PHNs were the "hub" of community care; PHNs lacked a common language to describe their work; PHNs envisioned their future practice encompassing their full scope of competencies. PHNs developed the "ICY Public Health Nursing Model," which articulates 14 public health interventions and identifies the scope of their work.
Developing and sustaining clinical leadership in front-line PHNs was accomplished through these various quality assurance activities.
PubMed ID
23803427 View in PubMed
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[Does the patient obtain close contact with the hospital physician when a physician/nurse team is established?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221848
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 18;155(3):158-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1993
Author
C. Brauer
S. Richter
E. Kjøller
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling, Københavns Amts Sygehus Skt. Elisabeth.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 18;155(3):158-61
Date
Jan-18-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Continuity of Patient Care
Denmark
Hospitalization
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Physician-Patient Relations
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The contact between patients and doctors was examined having established smaller doctor/nurse teams to take care of the same seven to eight patients during the weekdays of their stay at hospital. Ten weekdays after their admission to hospital 63% of the patients had not had contact with any other doctor(s) than their personal doctor(s), and 70% of the patients had seen only two different doctors. During the same period the doctors saw their patients three times on an average. We conclude that organizing the hospital doctors in small teams is a way to obtain good continuity in the contact between the patient and the hospital doctor.
PubMed ID
8421874 View in PubMed
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The effects of clinical supervision on the quality of care: examining the results of team supervision.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195374
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Feb;33(4):492-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
K. Hyrkäs
M. Paunonen-Ilmonen
Author Affiliation
Researcher, Doctoral Student, Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. nueihy@uta.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Feb;33(4):492-502
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Finland
Focus Groups
Hospitals, University
Humans
Nursing Care - standards
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
AIM(S) OF THE STUDY: This study is part of a larger research project (1995-1998) aiming at quality improvement by means of clinical supervision (CS). The purpose of the study is to ascertain the conceptions of five ward teams having CS of its effects on the quality of care.
The quality of nursing care has been debated since at least the 1980s. An extensive literature and research reports describe a variety of interventions and methods to improve the quality of care. One of the interventions is CS. However, the amount of empirical research exploring the effects of CS especially on the quality of care is limited.
Data were collected using group interviews and analysed using the method of phenomenography.
The following categories describing the conceptions related to CS and to the quality of care emerged: knowledge, change and 'I and we as providers of quality'. Conceptions of the effects varied between and within the teams and sometimes contradicted each other. The importance of knowledge was underlined on three of the five wards. The patient's point of view emerged only on one ward.
It can be concluded that CS has effects on the quality of care and it can be considered a quality improving intervention in nursing practice. However, the knowledge of the different conceptions produced in this study also gives proof that team supervision is a challenge for supervisors.
PubMed ID
11251737 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a partnership model of care delivery involving registered nurses and unlicensed assistive personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196500
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 1999 May-Jun;12(2):4-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
A E Tourangeau
P. White
J. Scott
M. McAllister
L. Giles
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing.
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 1999 May-Jun;12(2):4-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Focus Groups
Humans
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Models, Nursing
Nurses' Aides - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing, Team - organization & administration
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
The employment of unlicensed personnel in Canadian acute care hospitals has been undertaken without clear evidence of outcomes for patients, caregivers, and hospital organizations. This quasi-experimental evaluation study was completed in a metropolitan Toronto acute care hospital to examine the effects of a new nursing care delivery system which included unlicensed assistive personnel. Most of the expected benefits of the newly implemented nursing care delivery system did not materialize leading to the conclusion that the employment of unlicensed assistive personnel in acute care hospital systems may not offer additional benefits for patients, caregivers, or hospital organizations. The processes and results of this study provide useful information for nurse administrators who are seeking effective and innovative care delivery systems that are designed to optimize patient, caregiver, and hospital outcomes.
PubMed ID
11094929 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.