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76 records – page 1 of 8.

AARN applauds Romanow Report. Urges all levels of government to work together to improve health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186148
Source
Alta RN. 2003 Jan;59(1):1, 4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003

[After Summer's end: burned out, guilt-ridden and worn out].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238224
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Oct 7;72(17):6-7, 11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-7-1985
Author
J. Bjørkvik
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Oct 7;72(17):6-7, 11
Date
Oct-7-1985
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Holidays
Humans
Norway
Nurses - supply & distribution
Nursing Service, Hospital - manpower
Seasons
PubMed ID
3854565 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Archipelago idyl and central location are not enough].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235069
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Jun 19;74(11):27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-1987
Author
I H Aune
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Jun 19;74(11):27
Date
Jun-19-1987
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medically underserved area
Norway
Nurses - supply & distribution
PubMed ID
3648990 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aspects of medical manpower under national health insurance in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241393
Source
J Public Health Policy. 1983 Dec;4(4):504-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Source
BMJ. 2000 Apr 15;320(7241):1030
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2000
Author
D. Spurgeon
Source
BMJ. 2000 Apr 15;320(7241):1030
Date
Apr-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada
Humans
Nurses - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Quebec
PubMed ID
10764358 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 1992;17(4):739-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
R G Evans
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia.
Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 1992;17(4):739-62
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Comprehensive Health Care
Cost Control
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Financing, Organized
Government
Health Care Costs
Health Policy
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Insurance, Health
Medical Laboratory Science
Nurses - supply & distribution
Physicians - supply & distribution
Reimbursement Mechanisms
State Government
Abstract
Canadians are, by and large, satisfied with their health care system. It is for them a symbol of their community and distinguishes them from the United States. Unlike the health system of that country, it is universal, comprehensive, and accessible, and it costs less as a percentage of GNP to run. The difference between the two systems is rooted in differences in funding. By providing coverage of medically necessary care under a single nonprofit payer (the provincial governments, with guidance and some funds from the federal government), the Canadian system avoids the large overheads and profit incentives that make a fragmented private insurance industry so expensive and inequitable. Whereas health insurance in Canada is socialized, care is not: patients are free to choose among providers, physicians are primarily in private practice, and hospitals are independent, nonprofit institutions overseen by boards of trustees. Canada and the United States view the challenges confronting the Canadian system differently. To Canadians, the real issue is how to improve the management of a popular, effective, and heretofore affordable system, so as to preserve it in a more hostile economic environment. The specific areas of concern are common to all health care systems in the developed world but bear little resemblance to the misleading images of Canada fabricated in the United States for internal political purposes. For Canadians, the proof of their system is that it works, while millions in the United States go without.
Notes
Comment In: J Health Polit Policy Law. 1993 Fall;18(3 Pt 2):763-708283001
PubMed ID
1299688 View in PubMed
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Canadian oncology nurse work environments: part I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145366
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Jan;22(4):50-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Debra Bakker
Michael Conlon
Margaret Fitch
Esther Green
Lorna Butler
Karin Olson
Greta Cummings
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6, Canada. dbakker@laurentian.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Jan;22(4):50-68
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing
Nurses - supply & distribution
Oncology Nursing - manpower - trends
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Social Perception
Stress, Psychological
Workload
Abstract
The global nursing shortage and statistics indicating a steady increase in the cancer patient workload suggest that the recruitment and retention of oncology nurses is and will be a serious problem. The purpose of this research study was to examine oncology nursing work environments in Canada and to determine the presence of workplace and professional practice factors. A total of 615 oncology nurses responded to a national survey in 2004. The majority of nurses indicated that positive nurse-physician relations and autonomy in clinical decision-making were factors that contributed to job satisfaction and the desire to remain in oncology nursing. However, the findings identified that nurse staffing, the lack of nursing leadership and inadequate opportunities to participate in policy decisions were areas of concern. Differences in work environment perceptions were seen most often when responses were compared across provincial regions. While the findings support previous research reports that the key to the nursing shortage is attention to nursing work environments, they also emphasize the need for organizations to act now. A follow-up survey was conducted in 2006; analysis of these data will be presented in a future report on nurses' perceptions of their work environments and job satisfaction over time.
PubMed ID
20160524 View in PubMed
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Canadian strategies to stabilize the work force.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152040
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Macdonald-Rencz
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Office of Nursing Policy, Canada.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):53-5
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Canada
Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - trends
Forecasting
Foreign Professional Personnel - supply & distribution
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Medically underserved area
Nurses - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - trends
Abstract
Today's globalized economy creates opportunities for health professionals but corresponding challenges for countries facing significant shortages of these professionals. The uneven playing field between developed and developing countries hampers the latter in recruiting and retaining trained professionals to oversee and maintain their health systems. Given the salary differentials and variance in working conditions between developed and developing countries, developing countries may lack the pull factors to keep their nurses and doctors from emigrating. However, many developed countries have made significant investments to address this challenge.
Notes
Comment On: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):24-5019289910
PubMed ID
19289912 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.