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Abbreviations in Swedish Clinical Text--use by three professions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262983
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Elin Lövestam
Sumithra Velupillai
Maria Kvist
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviations as Topic
Electronic Health Records - classification - statistics & numerical data
Natural Language Processing
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Nutritionists - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
A list of 266 abbreviations from dieticians' notes in patient records was used to extract the same abbreviations from patient records written by three professions: dieticians, nurses and physicians. A context analysis of 40 of the abbreviations showed that ambiguous meanings were common. Abbreviations used by dieticians were found to be used by other professions, but not always with the same meaning. This ambiguity of abbreviations might cause misunderstandings and put patient safety at risk.
PubMed ID
25160281 View in PubMed
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Access to a school health nurse and adolescent health needs in the universal school health service in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302526
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2019 Mar; 33(1):165-175
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Hanne Kivimäki
Vesa Saaristo
Kirsi Wiss
Marjut Frantsi-Lankia
Timo Ståhl
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Researcher, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2019 Mar; 33(1):165-175
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
School Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Universal school health services are expected to offer similar, needs-based services to all students across schools, service providers and students' socio-economic statuses and health needs. This study investigates access to school health nurses in Finland. The objectives were to study the differences in access to school health nurse between service providers, schools, students' characteristics and school health nurse resources. Access was examined through a nationwide School Health Promotion study, which is a self-reporting, voluntary and anonymous survey for 8th and 9th graders (15 to 16-year old, N = 71865). The ethical committee of the National Institute for Health and Welfare has approved procedure for the School Health Promotion study. Data on school health nurse resources and service providers were obtained from the national database (534 schools; 144 service providers). Multilevel logistic regression was used. Of the pupils, 15% of girls and 11% of boys reported difficult access to a school health nurse. The number of adolescents who reported difficult access ranged between service providers (0%-41%) and schools (0%-75%). Students with lower socio-economic background, poorer well-being at school, lack of support for studying and greater health needs reported difficult access more often. School health nurse resources were associated with difficult access only among boys, when resources were under the national recommendations. These findings raise concern about equality and unmet health needs in school health services.
PubMed ID
30276842 View in PubMed
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Administrative claims data analysis of nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149161
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Andrea L Murphy
Ruth Martin-Misener
Charmaine Cooke
Ingrid Sketris
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. andrea.murphy@dal.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Oct;65(10):2077-87
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - economics - nursing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nurse Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Nurse's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pharmacoepidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study to identify the patterns of prescribing by primary health care nurse practitioners for a cohort of older adults.
The older adult population is known to receive complex pharmacotherapy. Monitoring prescribing to older adults can inform quality improvement initiatives. In comparison to other countries, research examining nurse practitioner prescribing in Canada is limited. Nurse practitioner prescribing for older adults is relatively unexplored in the international literature. Although commonly used to study physician prescribing, few studies have used claims data from drug insurance programmes to investigate nurse practitioner prescribing.
Drug claims for prescriptions written by nurse practitioners from fiscal years 2004/05 to 2006/07 for beneficiaries of the Nova Scotia Seniors' Pharmacare programme were analysed. Data were retrieved and analysed in May 2008. Prescribing was described for each drug using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code classification system by usage and costs for each fiscal year.
Antimicrobials and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs consistently represented the top ranked groups for prescription volume and cost. Over the three fiscal years, antimicrobial prescription rates declined relative to rates of other groups of medications. Prescription volume per nurse doubled and cost per prescription increased by approximately 20%.
Prescription claims data can be used to characterize the prescribing trends of nurse practitioners. Research linking patient characteristics, including diagnoses, to prescriptions is needed to assess prescribing quality. Some potential areas of improvement were identified with antimicrobial and non-steroidal antiinflammatory selection.
PubMed ID
19674174 View in PubMed
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Advancing nursing documentation--an intervention study using patients with leg ulcer as an example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150933
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2009 Sep;78(9):605-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Eva Törnvall
Lis Karin Wahren
Susan Wilhelmsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Campus Norköping, SE 60174 Norrköping, Sweden. evato@isv.liu.se
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2009 Sep;78(9):605-17
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Documentation - methods
Humans
Leg Ulcer - epidemiology - nursing
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
The aim was to implement and evaluate a standardised nursing record, using patients with leg ulcer as an example, regarding the content of the nursing record and district nurses' experiences of documentation.
This was a prospective, stratified and randomised intervention study, with one intervention group and one control group. A standardised nursing wound care record was designed and implemented in the electronic patient record in the intervention group for a period of 3 months. Pre- and post-intervention audits of nursing records [n=102 and n=92, respectively] were carried out and 126 district nurses answered questionnaires pre-intervention and 83 post-intervention.
The standardised nursing wound care record led to more informative, comprehensive and knowledge-intensive documentation according to the audit and district nurses' opinions. Furthermore, the district nurses' self-reported knowledge of nursing documentation increased in the intervention group. When the standardised nursing wound care record was not used, the documentation was mostly incomplete with a lack of nursing relevance. There were no differences in the district nurses' experiences of documentation in general between the two groups.
Using the standardised nursing wound care record improved nursing documentation meeting legal demands, which should increase the safety of patient. There was however a discrepancy between the nurses stated knowledge and how they carried out the documentation. Regular in-service training together with use of evidence based standardised nursing records, as a link to clinical reasoning about nursing care, could be ways effecting change.
PubMed ID
19447071 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in emotional and informational social support insufficiency for older adults in Atlantic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104774
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Dec;45(4):50-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Gloria McInnis-Perry
Lori E Weeks
Henrik Stryhn
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Dec;45(4):50-68
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Community Networks
Data Collection
Female
Geriatric Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Sex Distribution
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - nursing
Abstract
It is well documented that nursing is concerned about the social support needs of older adults and the effects of those needs on health and well-being. Using survey data from the Atlantic Seniors Housing Research Alliance, the authors explore the emotional and informational social support needs of community-dwelling Canadians aged 65 and older living in the Atlantic provinces. The results indicate that these needs are not being met fully and that they increase with age. Also, men and women report different insufficiencies for specific needs; more men than women report having no support across all items. Nurses should be sensitive to specific age and gender support needs of older adults. They should also increase their social assessments and promote healthy social networks, especially for those 80 years and older. Further nursing research is recommended.
PubMed ID
24617279 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Alta RN. 2001 May-Jun;57(3):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Richardson
Author Affiliation
slrichar@telusplanet.net
Source
Alta RN. 2001 May-Jun;57(3):3-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Demography
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - statistics & numerical data - trends
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In 2000 more than one-quarter of the Alberta RN labour force was older than 50 years of age, while close to one-half was between 36 and 50 years of age. While this age distribution denotes a mature RN cadre, with considerable valuable practice experience, it also signals a need for an increased number of new RN graduates to replace those soon to be retiring. Although possibly age-related, the proportion of Alberta RNs working regular full-time is less than half--only 45 per cent. Concomitantly, more than half of all Alberta RNs are employed casually and part-time. Especially in a time of RN shortage, reasons for such limited full-time employment warrant examination. As in the past, three-quarters of Alberta RNs work in institutional settings--hospitals and nursing homes--while only eight per cent work in community health. The shift to health promotion and disease prevention has yet to happen in Alberta. In 2000, almost 80 per cent of all Alberta RNs were employed in direct care giving, and less than 10 per cent were employed in management, administration and education. In 2000, almost two-thirds of all Alberta RNs held a diploma in nursing. Of the slightly more than 8,000 Alberta RNs with a baccalaureate degree, the overwhelming majority--85 per cent--worked in direct patient care, and only 13 per cent were employed in administration and teaching. Increasingly, we can expect to see more RNs with baccalaureate degrees at the bedside, in part because of the recent significant shift toward new graduates entering practice with a degree. Since 1997, the number of new RNs entering practice with a degree has been four times greater than the number entering with a diploma. Increased government funding of degree nursing programs aimed at alleviating the current nursing shortage means this trend will continue.
PubMed ID
11899449 View in PubMed
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The amount of informal and formal care among non-demented and demented elderly persons-results from a Swedish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70588
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;20(9):862-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
G. Nordberg
E. von Strauss
I. Kåreholt
L. Johansson
A. Wimo
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center (ARC), Box 6401, 113 82 Stockholm, Sweden. Gunilla.Nordberg@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;20(9):862-71
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - etiology - nursing
Dementia - nursing - psychology
Female
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Home Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Developed countries are experiencing a dramatic increase in the proportion of elderly persons, as well as a progressive aging of the elderly population itself. Knowledge regarding the amount of formal and informal care and its interaction at population-based level is limited. OBJECTIVES: To describe the amount of formal and informal care for non-demented and demented persons living at home in a population-based sample. METHODS: The population consisted of all inhabitants, 75 + years, living in a rural community (n = 740). They were clinically examined by physicians and interviewed by nurses. Dementia severity was measured according to Washington University Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Informal and formal care was examined with the RUD (Resource Utilization in Dementia) instrument. RESULTS: The amount of informal care was much greater than formal care and also greater among demented than non-demented. There was a relationship between the severity of the cognitive decline and the amount of informal care while this pattern was weaker regarding formal care. Tobit regression analyses showed a clear association between the number of hours of informal and formal care and cognitive decline although this pattern was much stronger for informal than formal care. CONCLUSIONS: Informal care substitutes rather than compliments formal care and highlights the importance of future studies in order to truly estimate the amount of informal and formal care and the interaction between them. This knowledge will be of importance when planning the use of limited resources, and when supporting informal carers in their effort to care for their intimates.
PubMed ID
16116583 View in PubMed
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Are Norwegian mentors failing to fail nursing students?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301925
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2019 Mar; 36:64-70
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Kari Westad Hauge
Hege Bakken
Ole David Brask
Anne Gutteberg
Bente Dale Malones
Ingeborg Ulvund
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Social Sciences, Høgskolen i Molde, Postboks 2110, 6402, Molde, Norway. Electronic address: Kari.W.Hauge@himolde.no.
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2019 Mar; 36:64-70
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Educational Measurement - standards - statistics & numerical data
Faculty, Nursing - psychology - standards
Humans
Mentors - education
Norway
Qualitative Research
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
It is highly important that nursing students are well educated and become safe and competent practitioners. This article presents the findings from a quantitative study investigating if Norwegian mentors fail to fail nursing students not achieving the learning outcomes in clinical studies in the bachelor's programme in nursing, in addition to the factors influencing their decisions. A survey was conducted among nurse mentors in hospital- and home-based nursing care in two Norwegian municipalities, and 561 nurses answered the questionnaire. The findings indicate that mentors sometimes fail to fail nursing students in clinical studies. Important factors influencing this decision were that the students did not put the patient's life at risk and that the mentors gave the student the benefit of the doubt. The mentors in our study thought that failing to fail students was not related to personal challenges and burdens. They also felt a lack of support from the educational institution. The findings suggest some future directions for nurse education programmes. The training of mentors, especially in managing failing students, and better support from liaison lecturers from the educational institution are important. It is also suggested that nurse education programmes together with mentors discuss the distinction between unsafe practices and learning outcomes for clinical studies.
PubMed ID
30875605 View in PubMed
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239 records – page 1 of 24.