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[Health personnel and teachers admitted to psychiatric institutions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73069
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Mar 10;115(7):842-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1995
Author
A. Roness
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk institutt, Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Mar 10;115(7):842-5
Date
Mar-10-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - manpower
Workload
Abstract
During the period 1985-89, 124 physicians were hospitalized in Norwegian psychiatric institutions. The physicians were compared with 91 nurses, 88 enrolled nurses and 110 teachers from three counties who were hospitalized during the same period. The overall rate of admission to psychiatric institutions seemed to be highest for the enrolled nurses and lowest for the teachers. There were few diagnostic differences between the groups. Relatively more of the female teachers were recruited from the middle age group (41-55 years), while the nurses and the enrolled nurses belonged most often to the youngest group (
PubMed ID
7701495 View in PubMed
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No significant differences between intervention programmes on neck, shoulder and low back pain: a prospective randomized study among home-care personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49866
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Jul;33(4):170-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
E. Horneij
B. Hemborg
I. Jensen
C. Ekdahl
Author Affiliation
Hälsoinvest, Ramlösa Clinic, Sweden. eva.horneij@swipnet.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Jul;33(4):170-6
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Therapy
Female
Home Health Aides - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Low Back Pain - therapy
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - therapy
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - therapy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shoulder Pain - therapy
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The effects of two different prevention programmes on: (1) reported neck, shoulder and back pain, (2) perceived physical exertion at work and perceived work-related psychosocial factors, were evaluated by questionnaires after 12 and 18 months. Female nursing aides and assistant nurses (n = 282) working in the home-care services, were randomly assigned to one of three groups for: (1) individually designed physical training programme, (2) work-place stress management, (3) control group. Results revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, improvements in low back pain were registered within both intervention groups for up to 18 months. Perceived physical exertion at work was reduced in the physical training group. Improvements in neck and shoulder pain did not differ within the three groups. Dissatisfaction with work-related, psychosocial factors was generally increased in all groups. As the aetiology of neck, shoulder and back disorders is multifactorial, a combination of the two intervention programmes might be preferable and should be further studied.
PubMed ID
11506215 View in PubMed
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Physical leisure-time activities and long-term sick leave: a 15-month prospective study of nurses' aides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49805
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jun;44(6):530-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Willy Eriksen
Dag Bruusgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130, Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway. w.b.eriksen@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jun;44(6):530-8
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine the relationship between physical leisure-time activities and the occurrence of long-term sick leaves in nurses' aides. Of 5563 Norwegian nurses' aides who were not on sick leave when they completed a questionnaire in 1999, 4744 (85.3%) completed a second questionnaire 15 months later. Brisk walks (odds ratio [OR], 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63 to 0.98), aerobics or gymnastics (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.49 to 1.02), and other physical leisure activities (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.00) for 20 minutes or more at least once a week predicted fewer long-term sick leaves (> 14 days), after adjustments for baseline health complaints, demographic and familial characteristics, former and current smoking, and work factors. In conclusion, regular physical leisure-time activity may be associated with a reduced risk of long-term sickness absence in nurses' aides.
PubMed ID
12085479 View in PubMed
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Sick leave among home-care personnel: a longitudinal study of risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70864
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 Nov 8;5(1):38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-8-2004
Author
Eva L Horneij
Irene B Jensen
Eva B Holmström
Charlotte Ekdahl
Author Affiliation
Ramlösa Clinic, Ramlösa Brunnshotell, Helsingborg, Sweden. eva.horneij@swipnet.se
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 Nov 8;5(1):38
Date
Nov-8-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Exertion
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Home Care Services - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Leisure Activities
Longitudinal Studies
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sick Leave - trends
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sick leave due to neck, shoulder and back disorders (NSBD) is higher among health-care workers, especially nursing aides/assistant nurses, compared with employees in other occupations. More information is needed about predictors of sick leave among health care workers. The aim of the study was to assess whether self-reported factors related to health, work and leisure time could predict: 1) future certified sick leave due to any cause, in nursing aides/assistant nurses (Study group I) and 2) future self-reported sick leave due to NSBD in nursing aides/assistant nurses (Study group II). METHODS: Study group I, comprised 443 female nursing aides/assistant nurses, not on sick leave at baseline when a questionnaire was completed. Data on certified sick leave were collected after 18 months. Study group II comprised 274 of the women, who at baseline reported no sick leave during the preceding year due to NSBD and who participated at the 18 month follow-up. Data on sick leave due to NSBD were collected from the questionnaire at 18 months. The associations between future sick leave and factors related to health, work and leisure time were tested by logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Health-related factors such as previous low back disorders (OR: 1.89; 95% CI 1.20-2.97) and previous sick leave (OR 6.40; 95%CI 3.97-10.31), were associated with a higher risk of future sick leave due to any cause. Factors related to health, work and leisure time, i.e. previous low back disorders (OR: 4.45; 95% CI 1.27-15.77) previous sick leave, not due to NSBD (OR 3.30; 95%CI 1.33-8.17), high strain work (OR 2.34; 95%CI 1.05-5.23) and high perceived physical exertion in domestic work (OR 2.56; 95%CI 1.12-5.86) were associated with a higher risk of future sick leave due to NSBD. In the final analyses, previous low back disorders and previous sick leave remained significant in both study groups. CONCLUSION: The results suggest a focus on previous low back disorders and previous sick leave for the design of early prevention programmes aiming at reducing future sick leave due to any cause, as well as due to NSBD, among nursing aides/assistant nurses. A multifactorial approach may be of importance in the early prevention of sick leave due to NSBD.
PubMed ID
15533255 View in PubMed
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Work factors as predictors of intense or disabling low back pain; a prospective study of nurses' aides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71066
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 May;61(5):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
W. Eriksen
D. Bruusgaard
S. Knardahl
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. w.b.eriksen@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 May;61(5):398-404
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Organizational Culture
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: To identify the work factors that predict intense low back pain (LBP) and LBP related sick leaves in nurses' aides. METHODS: The sample comprised 4266 randomly selected Norwegian nurses' aides, not bothered or only a little bothered by LBP during the previous three months, and not on sick leave when completing a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 3808 (89.3%) completed a second questionnaire 3 months later and 3651 (85.6%) completed a third questionnaire 15 months later. Intensity of low back symptoms and certified sick leaves attributed to LBP during the observation period were assessed by self reports at the follow ups. RESULTS: After adjustments for LBP during the three months prior to baseline, baseline health complaints, demographic and familial factors, and a series of physical, psychological, and social work factors, logistic regression analyses revealed the following associations: intense low back symptoms were predicted by frequent positioning of patients in bed, perceived lack of support from immediate superior, and perceived lack of pleasant and relaxing culture in the work unit. LBP related sick leaves were predicted by frequent handling of heavy objects, medium level of work demands, perceived lack of supportive and encouraging culture in the work unit, working night shifts, and working in a nursing home. Long term LBP related sick leaves were associated with changes of work or work tasks during the observation period that resulted in a perceived reduction of support and encouragement at work. CONCLUSIONS: Not only frequent mechanical exposures, but also organisational, psychological, and social work factors, such as night shift work, perceived lack of support from superior, and perceived lack of a pleasant and relaxing or supporting and encouraging culture in the work unit, are associated with an increased risk of intense low back symptoms and LBP related sick leaves in nurses' aides.
PubMed ID
15090659 View in PubMed
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Work factors as predictors of sickness absence: a three month prospective study of nurses' aides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63543
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Apr;60(4):271-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
W. Eriksen
D. Bruusgaard
S. Knardahl
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. w.b.eriksen@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Apr;60(4):271-8
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Organizational Culture
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: To identify the work factors that predict sickness absence in nurses' aides. METHODS: The sample comprised 5563 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on leave because of illness or pregnancy when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4931 (88.6%) completed a second questionnaire three months later. The outcome measure was the three month incidence proportion of certified sickness absence (>3 days), as assessed by self reports at follow up. RESULTS: Perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit (odds ratio (OR) 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28 to 2.34), working in psychiatric and paediatric wards, having injured the neck in an accident, and health complaints were associated with higher risk of sickness absence, after adjustments for a series of physical, psychological, and organisational work factors, personal engagement in the work unit, demographic characteristics, and daily consumption of cigarettes. Having untraditional jobs (for nurses' aides) (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.77), and engaging in aerobics or gym were associated with a lower risk of sickness absence. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that the three month effects of work factors on rates of certified sickness absence are modest in nurses' aides. The most important work factor, in terms of predicting sickness absence, seems to be perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit.
PubMed ID
12660375 View in PubMed
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Work factors as predictors of sickness absence attributed to airway infections; a three month prospective study of nurses' aides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52064
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;61(1):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
W. Eriksen
D. Bruusgaard
S. Knardahl
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. w.b.eriksen@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;61(1):45-51
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Organizational Culture
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: To identify the work factors that are related to sickness absence attributed to airway infections (AAI) in nurses' aides. METHODS: The sample comprised 5563 Norwegian nurses' aides, not on sick leave when they completed a mailed questionnaire in 1999. Of these, 4931 (88.6%) completed a second questionnaire three months later. The outcome measure was the three month incidence proportion of certified AAI (>3 days), assessed by self reports at follow up. RESULTS: Working in a paediatric ward (odds ratio (OR) 2.42; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39 to 4.21), perceived lack of encouraging and supportive culture in the work unit (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.61), and reporting medium (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.09 to 2.12), and high levels (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.13 to 2.26) of role conflicts at work were associated with an increased risk of AAI, after adjustments for baseline health complaints, demographic and familial factors, smoking, and a series of physical, psychological, and organisational work factors. The individual level factors male gender, smoking 10 cigarettes per day or more, having widespread pain, having had an accident related neck injury, and having long term health problems also predicted AAI. CONCLUSIONS: In nurses' aides, sickness absence attributed to airway infections seems to be related to the type of ward in which the aides are working, and to psychological and social work factors. Declaring airway infections as occupational diseases would have important consequences for the social security system.
PubMed ID
14691272 View in PubMed
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Work-related injury among direct care occupations in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163383
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2007 Nov;64(11):769-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Hasanat Alamgir
Yuri Cvitkovich
Shicheng Yu
Annalee Yassi
Author Affiliation
Statistics and Evaluation Department, Occupational Health and Safety Agency for Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2007 Nov;64(11):769-75
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Community Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Health Personnel - classification - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal System - injuries
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Nursing, Practical - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - classification - epidemiology
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Wounds and injuries - classification - epidemiology
Wounds, Stab - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine how injury rates and injury types differ across direct care occupations in relation to the healthcare settings in British Columbia, Canada.
Data were derived from a standardised operational database in three BC health regions. Injury rates were defined as the number of injuries per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) positions. Poisson regression, with Generalised Estimating Equations, was used to determine injury risks associated with direct care occupations (registered nurses [RNs], licensed practical nurses [LPNs) and care aides [CAs]) by healthcare setting (acute care, nursing homes and community care).
CAs had higher injury rates in every setting, with the highest rate in nursing homes (37.0 injuries per 100 FTE). LPNs had higher injury rates (30.0) within acute care than within nursing homes. Few LPNs worked in community care. For RNs, the highest injury rates (21.9) occurred in acute care, but their highest (13.0) musculoskeletal injury (MSI) rate occurred in nursing homes. MSIs comprised the largest proportion of total injuries in all occupations. In both acute care and nursing homes, CAs had twice the MSI risk of RNs. Across all settings, puncture injuries were more predominant for RNs (21.3% of their total injuries) compared with LPNs (14.4%) and CAs (3.7%). Skin, eye and respiratory irritation injuries comprised a larger proportion of total injuries for RNs (11.1%) than for LPNs (7.2%) and CAs (5.1%).
Direct care occupations have different risks of occupational injuries based on the particular tasks and roles they fulfil within each healthcare setting. CAs are the most vulnerable for sustaining MSIs since their job mostly entails transferring and repositioning tasks during patient/resident/client care. Strategies should focus on prevention of MSIs for all occupations as well as target puncture and irritation injuries for RNs and LPNs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17522139 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.