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155 records – page 1 of 16.

[2009 3M clinical award for innovation. Home care: collaboration between nurses' aide and nurse].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143928
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2010 May-Jun;7(3):7
Publication Type
Article
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1997 Jun 6;97(23):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-1997
Author
B. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Roskilde Universitetscenter.
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1997 Jun 6;97(23):30-1
Date
Jun-6-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Nursing
Humans
Nurses' Aides - education
Nursing, Practical - education
Time Factors
Notes
Comment In: Sygeplejersken. 1997 Jul 4;97(27):189355629
PubMed ID
9381378 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Nov 6;74(19):37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-1987
Author
E. Losnegård
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Nov 6;74(19):37
Date
Nov-6-1987
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Nurses' Aides
Nursing Services - manpower
Politics
PubMed ID
3438839 View in PubMed
Less detail

An integrated cooperation model for long-term mentally ill in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7873
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1995 Aug;33(8):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
E. Danielson
Author Affiliation
Ostersund College of Health and Caring Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1995 Aug;33(8):29-35
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care
Home Care Services
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
Nurses' Aides
Patient care team
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Social Work
Sweden
Abstract
1. This article describes a Swedish model of community support for patients with a long-term mental illness. 2. The result confirms that the staff-psychiatric practical nurses and aids are important in the care with support and coping as essential elements. 3. The staff members do require supervision from a nurse with knowledge about society and psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
7473311 View in PubMed
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Applying a palliative care approach in residential care: effects on nurse assistants' experiences of care provision and caring climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276707
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Dec;28(4):830-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Ingela Beck
Ulf Jakobsson
Anna-Karin Edberg
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Dec;28(4):830-41
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses' Aides - psychology
Nursing Homes
Palliative Care
Sweden
Abstract
A palliative care approach aims to integrate psychosocial and existential as well as relationship aspects in the care and is an approach that can be used in residential care. Nurse assistants are the ones who are closest to the residents but have limited prerequisites for working in accordance with the palliative care approach. We aimed to investigate the effects on nurse assistants' experiences of care provision and the caring climate of an intervention applying a palliative care approach in residential care.
An intervention involving nurse assistants (n = 75) and their leaders (n = 9), in comparison with controls (n = 110), was evaluated using a questionnaire at three points in time.
In the intervention group, positive effects were seen concerning the nurse assistants' reports of the care provision in that they focused more on the residents' stories about their lives and on communicating with the residents about what gave meaning to their lives. Also, negative effects were seen when the nurse assistants rated that the residents' needs for medical and nursing care had not been met at the facility directly after the intervention. No effects were seen concerning the caring climate or the prerequisites of providing more person-centred care.
The intervention seemed to have encouraged the nurse assistants to focus on relationship aspects with the residents. So as not to jeopardise the NAs' well-being and to support NAs in keeping themselves involved in existential issues, their support most certainly needs to be continuous and ongoing. However, in spite of the leaders' involvement, the intervention was not sufficient for changing the organisational prerequisites for more person-centred care.
PubMed ID
24494588 View in PubMed
Less detail

Applying a palliative care approach in residential care: effects on nurse assistants' work situation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269935
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Jun;13(3):543-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Ingela Beck
Ulf Jakobsson
Anna-Karin Edberg
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2015 Jun;13(3):543-53
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Non-Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Nurses' Aides - education - trends
Nursing Care - methods
Palliative Care - methods - utilization
Residential Facilities - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the effects of an intervention that applies a palliative care approach in residential care upon nurse assistants' level of strain, job satisfaction, and view of leadership.
A quasi-experimental, pretest and posttest design was used. Study circles with workshops involving nurse assistants (n = 75) and their superiors (n = 9) focusing on emotional and existential issues in palliative care were evaluated using a questionnaire answered by the nurse assistants at baseline (November 2009), post-intervention (May 2010), and six-month follow-up (November 2010) in comparison with controls (n = 110).
Directly after the intervention, the job satisfaction of the nurse assistants decreased and they perceived the leadership more negatively than before the intervention. Six months later, strain as a result of criticism from residents and their superiors and having difficulty in balancing emotional involvement had decreased.
The intervention initially seemed to decrease the well-being of the nurse assistants, which could be the result of their increased awareness of the residents' and relatives' needs, in combination with limited support. More emphasis should be placed on the role of leadership when implementing changes in practice.
PubMed ID
24138938 View in PubMed
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[A professional and political dead end].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234471
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Nov 6;74(19):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-1987

Are the barriers to good oral hygiene in nursing homes within the nurses or the patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130225
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Tril Willumsen
Line Karlsen
Richard Naess
Sissel Bjørntvedt
Author Affiliation
Dental Health Services' Competence East (TKØ), Norway. tiril@odont.uio.no
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Education, Nursing
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Homes
Oral Hygiene - education - nursing
Patient compliance
Periodontal Index
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
To explore nursing home patients' oral hygiene and their nurses' assessments of barriers to improvement.
In nursing homes, nurses are responsible for patients' oral hygiene.
This study assessed the oral hygiene of 358 patients in 11 Norwegian nursing homes. 494 nurses in the same nursing homes participated in a questionnaire study.
More than 40% of patients had unacceptable oral hygiene. 'More than 10 teeth' gave OR = 2, 1 (p = 0.013) and 'resist being helped' OR = 2.5 (p = 0.018) for unacceptable oral hygiene. Eighty percent of the nurses believed knowledge of oral health was important, and 9.1% often considered taking care of patients' teeth unpleasant. Half of the nurses reported lack of time to give regular oral care, and 97% experienced resistant behaviour in patients. Resistant behaviour often left oral care undone. Twenty-one percent of the nurses had considered making legal decisions about use of force or restraints to overcome resistance to teeth cleaning.
Oral hygiene in the nursing homes needed to be improved. Resistant behaviour is a major barrier. To overcome this barrier nurses' education, organisational strategies to provide more time for oral care, and coping with resistant behaviour in patients are important factors.
PubMed ID
22023222 View in PubMed
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[Are they trying to introduce nursing home assistants into the hospital system?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240228
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1984 Aug 15;84(33):8-9, 20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1984
Author
N. Engen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1984 Aug 15;84(33):8-9, 20
Date
Aug-15-1984
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Nurses' Aides - standards - utilization
Nursing Homes - manpower
Nursing Service, Hospital - manpower
PubMed ID
6567365 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Around-the-clock home care. Nursing assistants is one group too many in around-the-clock home care for the aged].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236892
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1986 Jun 11;86(24):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-1986

155 records – page 1 of 16.