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1114 records – page 1 of 112.

[1981 seminar: the patient. The needs and the rights of patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244236
Source
Auxiliaire. 1981 Sep;54(4):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Source
Auxiliaire. 1981 Sep;54(4):3-8
Date
Sep-1981
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Care - standards
Nursing, Practical - education
Patient Advocacy
Quebec
PubMed ID
6913405 View in PubMed
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[About the conditions of training and retraining of physicians and nurse personnel for the primary medical sanitary care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155048
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2008 May-Jun;(3):41-4
Publication Type
Article

Abuse of power in the nurse-client relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204640
Source
Nurs Stand. 1998 Jun 3-9;12(37):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Gallop
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing Science, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Nurs Stand. 1998 Jun 3-9;12(37):43-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Humans
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Reporting
Nurse-Patient Relations
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
A small number of health professionals are at risk of stepping over the boundaries of acceptable behaviour towards their clients. While sexual misconduct is clearly defined, the author argues that other inappropriate behaviours are harder to define--especially in nursing where touch is an important component of care.
PubMed ID
9732633 View in PubMed
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Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136673
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Salzmann-Erikson
Kim L Tz N
Ann-Britt Ivarsson
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dalarna University School of Health and Sciences, Falun, Sweden; Orebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Nursing Research
Crisis Intervention
Culture
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interview, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing, Team
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - nursing
Research Design
Security Measures
Social Environment
Social Values
Sweden
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.
PubMed ID
21355761 View in PubMed
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Achieving therapeutic clarity in assisted personal body care: professional challenges in interactions with severely ill COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155622
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kirsten Lomborg
Marit Kirkevold
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. kl@nursingscience.au.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Baths - nursing - psychology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Denmark
Dyspnea - etiology
Helping Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Negotiating - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This paper aims to present a theoretical account of professional nursing challenges involved in providing care to patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study objectives are patients' and nurses' expectations, goals and approaches to assisted personal body care.
The provision of help with body care may have therapeutic qualities but there is only limited knowledge about the particularities and variations in specific groups of patients and the nurse-patient interactions required to facilitate patient functioning and well-being. For patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathlessness represents a particular challenge in the performance of body care sessions.
We investigated nurse-patient interactions during assisted personal body care, using grounded theory with a symbolic interaction perspective and a constant comparative method.
Twelve cases of nurse-patient interactions were analysed. Data were based on participant observation, individual interviews with patients and nurses and a standardized questionnaire on patients' breathlessness.
Nurses and patients seemed to put effort into the interaction and wanted to find an appropriate way of conducting the body care session according to the patients' specific needs. Achieving therapeutic clarity in nurse-patient interactions appeared to be an important concern, mainly depending on interactions characterized by: (i) reaching a common understanding of the patient's current conditions and stage of illness trajectory, (ii) negotiating a common scope and structuring body care sessions and (iii) clarifying roles.
It cannot be taken for granted that therapeutic qualities are achieved when nurses provide assistance with body care. If body care should have healing strength, the actual body care activities and the achievement of therapeutic clarity in nurses' interaction with patients' appear to be crucial.
The paper proposes that patients' integrity and comfort in the body care session should be given first priority and raises attention to details that nurses should take into account when assisting severely ill patients.
PubMed ID
18710375 View in PubMed
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[Activities of the home nurse and cooperation with general practitioners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245700
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Jun 2;142(23):1531-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-1980
Author
M. Kjøller
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Jun 2;142(23):1531-6
Date
Jun-2-1980
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Denmark
Home Care Services
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation
PubMed ID
7404756 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perceptions of inpatient postpartum nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165660
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wendy E Peterson
Wendy Sword
Cathy Charles
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Clinical Health Sciences (Nursing) program, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Mothers - education - psychology
Narration
Nurse-Patient Relations
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Postnatal Care - psychology - standards
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - psychology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology
Abstract
The authors used a transcendental phenomenological approach to describe adolescent mothers' satisfactory and unsatisfactory inpatient postpartum nursing care experiences. They analyzed data from 14 in-depth interviews and found that adolescent mothers' satisfaction is dependent on their perceptions of the nurse's ability to place them "at ease." Nursing care qualities that contributed to satisfactory experiences included nurses' sharing information about themselves, being calm, demonstrating confidence in mothers, speaking to adolescent and adult mothers in the same way, and anticipating unstated needs. Nursing care was perceived to be unsatisfactory when it was too serious, limited to the job required, or different from care to adult mothers, or when nurses failed to recognize individual needs. In extreme cases, unsatisfactory experiences hindered development of an effective nurse-client relationship. These findings illustrate the value of qualitative inquiry for understanding patients' satisfaction with care, can be used for self-reflection, and have implications for nursing education programs.
PubMed ID
17220391 View in PubMed
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Advice-giving styles by finnish nurses in dietary counseling concerning type 2 diabetes care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178345
Source
J Health Commun. 2004 Jul-Aug;9(4):337-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Päivi Kiuru
Marita Poskiparta
Tarja Kettunen
Juha Saltevo
Leena Liimatainen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Health Commun. 2004 Jul-Aug;9(4):337-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diet therapy - nursing
Diet
Finland
Health Services Research
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Abstract
Dietary advice-giving is an important part of dietary counseling in diabetes care and prevention. The strategies of advice-giving, however, have not been explicated and the qualitative characteristics of conversations in diabetes counseling have remained mainly unstudied. This article describes the styles in which nurses responsible for diabetes counseling in Finnish primary care practices offer dietary advice for patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. The data consisted of 55 videotaped naturally occurring counseling sessions between 18 patients and five nurses and were analyzed using typology as an analyzing method. Four different styles of dietary advice-giving were recognized from the speech episodes concerning dietary behavior: recommending, persuasive, supportive, and permitting styles. Recommending style of advice-giving is recognized to be the dominant style that has arisen from the data and, actually, it seems to be the starting point in advice-giving practices. The other styles were used rarely, which suggest that the nurses rely upon quite a narrow selection of communication strategies that helps them to control the topics and the situation, although patient-centered counseling is strongly demanded nowadays. On the basis of our results we suggest that health professionals may need to become more aware of their advice-giving practices in routine situations through conscious effort of self-evaluation. A more detailed analysis of interpersonal conversations during counseling sessions is also needed as it may offer valuable information to promote patients' self-management skills by facilitating observation of conversational elements recognized to be successful in diabetes counseling.
PubMed ID
15371086 View in PubMed
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[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
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1114 records – page 1 of 112.