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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Alaska nurse practitioners' and physician assistants' perceptions of the collaboration process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6110
Source
J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 1998 Nov;10(11):509-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
M J Beisel
Source
J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 1998 Nov;10(11):509-14
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Physician Assistants - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
In summary, the findings suggest that NPs and PAs have a common perception of the collaboration process, and most participants engaged in more collaborative behaviors rather than less. The results can serve as an introduction to studying collaborative interactions between NPs and PAs. Such collaborative efforts have the potential to optimize patient care and increase respect, trust, and communication between the two professions.
PubMed ID
10085864 View in PubMed
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Alaska nurse practitioners' barriers to use of prescription drug monitoring programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297608
Source
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2018 Jan; 30(1):35-42
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Heath Christianson
Elizabeth Driscoll
Aicha Hull
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Services, Colorado Suncrest Hospice, Colorado Springs, Colorado.
Source
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract. 2018 Jan; 30(1):35-42
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Competence - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Nurse Practitioners - psychology - standards - statistics & numerical data
Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs - statistics & numerical data
Prescription Drugs - administration & dosage
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have begun to demonstrate themselves as useful tools in enhancing safe and responsible prescription of controlled substances. The purpose of this project was to describe current practice, beliefs, and barriers of Alaska nurse practitioners (NPs) regarding the Alaska PDMP.
A questionnaire was sent to 635 Alaskan NPs with a 33% return rate. The data depicted prescribing habits, barriers to use, barriers to registering, and opinions on how to make the PDMP more clinically useful.
More attention is needed to maximize PDMP exposure and incorporation into daily workflow if it is to achieve full potential. Registered users should be able to delegate PDMP authority to select staff members to reduce time commitments and increase usage. Many providers felt that assigning unique patient identifiers could prevent consumers from filling prescriptions under aliases. Finally, an overwhelming majority of users wanted faster data entry and proactive reports.
This project explored the differences between PDMP users and nonusers and outlined NP suggestions for process improvement. A better understanding of PDMP use will aid providers in safe prescribing while curbing the prescription drug epidemic and ultimately reducing abuse, misuse, and death from overdose.
PubMed ID
29757920 View in PubMed
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Canadian nurse practitioner job satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150345
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(2):41-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kimberley LaMarche
Susan Tullai-McGuinness
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nursing and Health Studies, Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB, Canada. lamarche@athabascau.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(2):41-57
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Professional Autonomy
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To examine the level of job satisfaction and its association with extrinsic and intrinsic job satisfaction characteristics among Canadian primary healthcare nurse practitioners (NPs).
A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data on NPs' job satisfaction and on the factors that influence their job satisfaction. A convenience sample of licensed Canadian NPs was recruited from established provincial associations and special-interest groups. Data about job satisfaction were collected using two valid and reliable instruments, the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Survey and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to describe the results.
The overall job satisfaction for this sample ranged from satisfied to highly satisfied. The elements that had the most influence on overall job satisfaction were the extrinsic category of partnership/collegiality and the intrinsic category of challenge/autonomy. These findings were consistent with Herzberg's Dual Factor Theory of Job Satisfaction.
The outcomes of this study will serve as a foundation for designing effective human health resource retention and recruitment strategies that will assist in enhancing the implementation and the successful preservation of the NP's role.
PubMed ID
19521160 View in PubMed
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Source
Adv Nurse Pract. 1999 Apr;7(4):84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
C R Martinek
Author Affiliation
Maniilaq Health Center, Kotzebue, Alaska, USA.
Source
Adv Nurse Pract. 1999 Apr;7(4):84
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Inuits
Medicine, Traditional
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Transcultural Nursing
PubMed ID
10382392 View in PubMed
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Community of practice: a nurse practitioner collaborative model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133186
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2011 Jun;24(2):99-112
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Judith Burgess
Linda Sawchenko
Author Affiliation
Health Services, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. jburgess@uvic.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2011 Jun;24(2):99-112
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Health Nursing - methods - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Abstract
A study was undertaken with nurse practitioners (NPs) in 2008-2009 to examine post-legislation role development in British Columbia. The authors used a participatory action research approach to engage NPs in social investigation, education and action, and to explore, from the participants' perspective, how collaboration advances NP role integration in primary healthcare. A particular discovery of the study was the Interior Health Authority Community of Practice (CoP) established in collaboration with health leaders and NPs. The purpose of this paper is to report on the CoP and the five characteristics describing this collaborative CoP model, including sanctioned social structure, knowledge exchange network, practice discovery and innovation, generating meaning and value, and power sharing for strategic improvement. The CoP helped NPs to build collegial and collaborative relationships, enhance practice learning and competence, extend and apply new knowledge, enrich professional identities, and shape health organizational policy and politics. Because healthcare research about CoPs is limited, principles of a collaborative CoP model are offered for broader healthcare use. The authors conclude that a collaborative CoP model addresses the internal interests and needs of participating members while attending to the external concerns of the organization, and thus contributes to healthcare improvement.
PubMed ID
21730772 View in PubMed
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Exploring the heart of ethical nursing practice: implications for ethics education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179849
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2004;11(3):240-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Gweneth Doane
Bernadette Pauly
Helen Brown
Gladys McPherson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, Box 1700, Victoria, BC V8W 2YZ, Canada. gdoane@uvic.ca
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2004;11(3):240-53
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making - ethics
Ethics, Nursing - education
Focus Groups
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Morals
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Nursing Care - ethics
Nursing Process - ethics
Professional Practice - ethics
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
The limitations of rational models of ethical decision making and the importance of nurses' human involvement as moral agents is increasingly being emphasized in the nursing literature. However, little is known about how nurses involve themselves in ethical decision making and action or about educational processes that support such practice. A recent study that examined the meaning and enactment of ethical nursing practice for three groups of nurses (nurses in direct care positions, student nurses, and nurses in advanced practice positions) highlighted that humanly involved ethical nursing practice is also simultaneously a personal process and a socially mediated one. Of particular significance was the way in which differing role expectations and contexts shaped the nurses' ethical practice. The study findings pointed to types of educative experiences that may help nurses to develop the knowledge and ability to live in and navigate their way through the complex, ambiguous and shifting terrain of ethical nursing practice.
PubMed ID
15176638 View in PubMed
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Grounded energy. Working with young people is central to Don Ragush's life and career.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123583
Source
Can Nurse. 2012 May;108(5):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012

The impact of [corrected] expanded nursing practice on professional identify in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119940
Source
Clin Nurse Spec. 2012 Nov-Dec;26(6):329-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karin Piil
Raymond Kolbæk
Goetz Ottmann
Bodil Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Author Affiliations: Outpatient Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Karinpiil77@hotmail.com
Source
Clin Nurse Spec. 2012 Nov-Dec;26(6):329-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Nursing Research
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Referral and Consultation
Self Concept
Self Efficacy
Abstract
This article explores the concept of professional identity of Danish nurses working in an expanded practice. The case study explores the experiences of a small group of Danish nurses with a new professional category that reaches into a domain that customarily belonged to physicians. The aim of this case study was to explore the impact of "nurse consultations," representing an expanded nursing role, of 5 nurses focusing on their perception of autonomy, self-esteem, and confidence.
The case study used semistructured interviews with 5 participants triangulated and validated with participant observations, a focus group interview, and theoretically derived insights.
This study indicates that nurses working within a new expanded professional practice see themselves as still engaged in nursing and not as substitute physicians. The study also suggests that the involved nurses gained a higher sense of autonomy, self-esteem, and confidence in their practice. These elements have a positive impact on their professional identity.
The research demonstrates that for the nurses involved in expanded professional practice, the boundaries of professional practice have shifted significantly. The research indicates that an expanded practice generates a new domain within the professional identity of nurses.
Notes
Erratum In: Clin Nurse Spec. 2013 Jan-Feb;27(1):43
PubMed ID
23059718 View in PubMed
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Impact of selected variables on job burnout in nurse practitioners and physicians assistants in the State of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293602
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
1984
Author
Hess, Irene
Date
1984
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Nurse practitioners -- Psychology -- Alaska
Physicians' assistants -- Psychology -- Alaska
Burn out (Psychology)
Notes
RT 82.8 .H47 1984
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Introducing the nurse practitioner into the surgical ward: an ethnographic study of interprofessional teamwork practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302687
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Jun; 32(2):765-771
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Susanne Kvarnström
Eva Jangland
Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren
Author Affiliation
Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Jun; 32(2):765-771
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Practitioners - psychology
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Surgeons - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The first nurse practitioners in surgical care were introduced into Swedish surgical wards in 2014. Internationally, organisations that have adopted nurse practitioners into care teams are reported to have maintained or improved the quality of care. However, close qualitative descriptions of teamwork practice may add to existing knowledge of interprofessional collaboration when introducing nurse practitioners into new clinical areas. The aim was to report on an empirical study describing how interprofessional teamwork practice was enacted by nurse practitioners when introduced into surgical ward teams.
The study had a qualitative, ethnographic research design, drawing on a sociomaterial conceptual framework. The study was based on 170 hours of ward-based participant observations of interprofessional teamwork practice that included nurse practitioners. Data were gathered from 2014 to 2015 across four surgical sites in Sweden, including 60 interprofessional rounds. The data were analysed with an iterative reflexive procedure involving inductive and theory-led approaches. The study was approved by a Swedish regional ethics committee (Ref. No.: 2014/229-31). The interprofessional teamwork practice enacted by the nurse practitioners that emerged from the analysis comprised a combination of the following characteristic role components: clinical leader, bridging team colleague and ever-present tutor. These role components were enacted at all the sites and were prominent during interprofessional teamwork practice.
The participant nurse practitioners utilised the interprofessional teamwork practice arrangements to enact a role that may be described in terms of a quality guarantee, thereby contributing to the overall quality and care flow offered by the entire surgical ward team.
PubMed ID
28833414 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.