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[8 out of 10 midwives informed about folic acid. Most of them considered their knowledge about folic acid not sufficient]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30331
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-2004
Author
Anette Lundqvist
Anna Lena Wennberg
Gunvor Lövgren
Herbert Sandström
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå universitet. anette.lundqvist@nurs.umu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Date
Apr-7-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Nursing, Continuing
English Abstract
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - complications - prevention & control
Guidelines
Health education
Humans
Maternal health services
Maternal Welfare
Neural Tube Defects - etiology - prevention & control
Nurse Midwives - education
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Deficiency of folic acid increases the risk for neural tube defects among newborn children and megaloblastic anaemia in the mother. The aim of this study was to make a survey of how midwives working in maternity health care, family planning guidance, and specialist prenatal care in a Swedish county inform women of childbearing age about folic acid. The questionnaire study showed that 79% of the midwives informed the women about folic acid. Usually, the women received information first when they asked for it and midwifes were less prone to inform young women about folic acid. 87% of the midwives felt that they did not know enough about folic acid. CONCLUSIONS: Midwives play an important role in information about the need of folic acid intake for women in childbearing age. Changes in local routines, guidelines and further education of midwifes would subsequently provide information about the importance of folic acid to women in childbearing age.
PubMed ID
15146665 View in PubMed
Less detail

[12 years of cross-professional team work in childbirth in Herlev]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65229
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Jan 17;90(3):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-1990

Acceptance of screening and abortion for Down syndrome among Finnish midwives and public health nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200072
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1999 Nov;19(11):1015-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
P. Jallinoja
P. Santalahti
H. Toiviainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland. piia@jallinoja@helsinki.fi
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1999 Nov;19(11):1015-22
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Down Syndrome - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis - psychology
Public health nursing
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Abstract
In this study we evaluated how well maternal serum screening and abortions for Down syndrome were accepted among midwives and public health nurses, and compared how those who accepted and did not accept abortions for Down syndrome differed from each other. The questionnaire was mailed in 1998 to 400 midwives and 400 public health nurses. 79 per cent responded. The majority said that all pregnant women should be offered a screening test for Down syndrome, but less than half accepted abortion for Down syndrome. Thus, the 'informative part' of the screening (serum screening itself) is supported more often than the 'operative part' (selective abortion)-or at least the 'operative part' was found to be a more difficult question. We suggest that whereas screening may be perceived as a question of more choices, information and self-determination, abortion is more clearly a moral question. The professional background characteristics and attitudes of those accepting and not accepting abortion for Down syndrome were relatively similar, but having a midwife's education, practical involvement in serum screening and having patients with Down syndrome were associated with a somewhat higher percentage of acceptance and a lower percentage of 'don't know' responses.
PubMed ID
10589051 View in PubMed
Less detail

"A challenge" - healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277305
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Hanna Grundström
Preben Kjølhede
Carina Berterö
Siw Alehagen
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Dysmenorrhea - diagnosis - etiology
Dyspareunia - diagnosis - etiology
Endometriosis - complications - diagnosis
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Male
Menstruation
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives
Ovulation
Pelvic Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Physicians
Professional Competence
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify and describe the experiences of healthcare professionals when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 gynecologists, six general practitioners and nine midwives working at one university hospital, one central hospital, one private gynecology clinic and five healthcare centers in south-east Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative conventional content analysis.
Three clusters were identified: the corroborating encounter, the normal variation of menstruation cycles, and the suspicion of endometriosis. The healthcare professionals tried to make a corroborating encounter by acknowledging the woman, taking time to listen, and giving an explanation for the problems. Healthcare professionals had different ways to determine what was normal as regards menstrual pain, ovulation pain and dyspareunia. They also needed to have the competence to act and react when the symptoms indicated endometriosis.
Meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis is challenging and demands a certain level of competence from healthcare professionals. Sometimes the symptoms are camouflaged as "normal" menstruation pain, making it hard to satisfy the needs of this patient group.
PubMed ID
26826048 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A consensus document on maternity care. More evident distribution of responsibilities increases patient safety].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220341
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Sep 1;90(35):2897-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Sep-1-1993

[Activities in the maternity clinic and total public health care in the city of Seinäjoki].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227961
Source
Katilolehti. 1990 Dec;95(8):18-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990

[Advice for midwives who prescribe drugs in the management of childbirth]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64769
Source
Jordemodern. 1993 Dec;106(12):457-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
G. Fahlberg
Source
Jordemodern. 1993 Dec;106(12):457-9
Date
Dec-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Legislation, Drug
Nurse Midwives
Pregnancy
Prescriptions, Drug
Sweden
PubMed ID
8106285 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A great maternity hospital with individualized care and documentation via a care plan for every mother/child. Where? Karlstad BB]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59812
Source
Jordemodern. 1990 Nov;103(11):386-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990

238 records – page 1 of 24.