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Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136673
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Salzmann-Erikson
Kim L Tz N
Ann-Britt Ivarsson
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dalarna University School of Health and Sciences, Falun, Sweden; Orebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Nursing Research
Crisis Intervention
Culture
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interview, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing, Team
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - nursing
Research Design
Security Measures
Social Environment
Social Values
Sweden
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.
PubMed ID
21355761 View in PubMed
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Achieving therapeutic clarity in assisted personal body care: professional challenges in interactions with severely ill COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155622
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kirsten Lomborg
Marit Kirkevold
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. kl@nursingscience.au.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Baths - nursing - psychology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Denmark
Dyspnea - etiology
Helping Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Negotiating - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This paper aims to present a theoretical account of professional nursing challenges involved in providing care to patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study objectives are patients' and nurses' expectations, goals and approaches to assisted personal body care.
The provision of help with body care may have therapeutic qualities but there is only limited knowledge about the particularities and variations in specific groups of patients and the nurse-patient interactions required to facilitate patient functioning and well-being. For patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathlessness represents a particular challenge in the performance of body care sessions.
We investigated nurse-patient interactions during assisted personal body care, using grounded theory with a symbolic interaction perspective and a constant comparative method.
Twelve cases of nurse-patient interactions were analysed. Data were based on participant observation, individual interviews with patients and nurses and a standardized questionnaire on patients' breathlessness.
Nurses and patients seemed to put effort into the interaction and wanted to find an appropriate way of conducting the body care session according to the patients' specific needs. Achieving therapeutic clarity in nurse-patient interactions appeared to be an important concern, mainly depending on interactions characterized by: (i) reaching a common understanding of the patient's current conditions and stage of illness trajectory, (ii) negotiating a common scope and structuring body care sessions and (iii) clarifying roles.
It cannot be taken for granted that therapeutic qualities are achieved when nurses provide assistance with body care. If body care should have healing strength, the actual body care activities and the achievement of therapeutic clarity in nurses' interaction with patients' appear to be crucial.
The paper proposes that patients' integrity and comfort in the body care session should be given first priority and raises attention to details that nurses should take into account when assisting severely ill patients.
PubMed ID
18710375 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of wives to prostate cancer following diagnosis and 3 months after treatment: a test of family adaptation theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168110
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):827-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Hélène Ezer
Nicole Ricard
Louise Bouchard
Luis Souhami
Fred Saad
Armen Aprikian
Yoshi Taguchi
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 2A7. helene.ezer@mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):827-38
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aftercare - psychology
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Erectile Dysfunction - etiology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Psychological Theory
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Urination Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Prostate cancer challenges not only the men with the disease, but also their partners. Existing studies have focused on the relationship between type of treatment and sexual and urinary function in men, with recent qualitative work suggesting that men and their spouses have differing responses to the illness. Factors predicting women's adaptation to prostate cancer have not been examined.
Using a model derived from family stress and adaptation theory, this study examined (1) the contribution of urinary and sexual symptoms, sense of coherence, marital resources and situational appraisal to wives' global adaptation (PAIS) and emotional adaptation (POMS), and (2) the role of situational appraisal as a mediator between the set of independent variables and PAIS and POMS.
In a prospective, correlational design, data were collected from 70 women following their partners' diagnosis and again 3 months later.
Using a path analysis approach, between 30% and 62.7% of the variance in global adjustment and mood disturbance was explained across model tests. Sense of coherence was a strong and consistent predictor. Appraisal acted as a mediator only at time 2, mediating the effect of symptom distress on global adaptation. Change in sense of coherence and change in family resources predicted global adaptation and emotional adaptation at time 2, and predicted the change between time 1 and 2 in those variables.
The findings suggest nursing interventions that mobilize and build wives' sense of the manageability, meaningfulness and comprehensibility of life events, and that foster cohesion and flexibility within the marital relationship. Interventions that mitigate the impact of urinary symptoms and the appraisal of threat in the illness event are also indicated. Additional model-testing studies based on family adaptation theory with patients and family members in other types of cancer would help build nursing knowledge for interventions in cancer.
PubMed ID
16876802 View in PubMed
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Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
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Affective learning in end-of-life care education: the experience of nurse educators and students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153526
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Louise-Andrée Brien
Alain Legault
Nicole Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal, Quebéc, Canada. louise-andree.brien@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Learning
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Problem-Based Learning - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
Preparing future nurses to care for dying patients and their families represents a challenge for nursing education. Affective learning, essential to nurture a caring perspective in end-of-life care, can elicit strong emotional reactions in students, to which nurse educators must remain keenly sensitive. This article presents the experience of nurse educators and students with experiential and reflective activities addressing the affective domain of learning, within an intensive 4-week undergraduate course on end-of-life care, developed with a competency-based approach. It stressed the importance of strategic teaching for developing interpersonal competencies in end-of-life care, but revealed difficulties for both nurse educators and students in assessing outcomes derived from affective learning.
PubMed ID
19104478 View in PubMed
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[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
Less detail

Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147224
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria Forsner
Lilian Jansson
Anna Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. mfr@du.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Coercion
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Play and Playthings - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Thinking
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Fear can be problematic for children who come into contact with medical care. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being afraid when in contact with medical care, as narrated by children 7-11 years old. Nine children participated in the study, which applied a phenomenological hermeneutic analysis methodology. The children experienced medical care as "being threatened by a monster," but the possibility of breaking this spell of fear was also mediated. The findings indicate the important role of being emotionally hurt in a child's fear to create, together with the child, an alternate narrative of overcoming this fear.
PubMed ID
19931150 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the nursing role in the care of patients with neuromuscular disorders].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137581
Source
Can J Neurosci Nurs. 2010;32(4):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Cynthia Gagnon
Maud-Christine Chouinard
Melissa Lavoie
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé de l'Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. Cynthia.Gagnon4@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Neurosci Nurs. 2010;32(4):22-9
Date
2010
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Humans
Models, Nursing
Myotonic Dystrophy - nursing
Neuromuscular Diseases - nursing - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Theory
Patient Education as Topic
Quebec
Social Support
Abstract
The nursing role in neuromuscular disorders has been shown as a promising solution in service organization. However, the role of neuromuscular nurses has scarcely been addressed in the literature. The present evaluation process was geared toward defining nursing role in relation to systematic follow-up of neuromuscular disorders and to assess its theoretical background.
PubMed ID
21268911 View in PubMed
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"And then you'll see her in the grocery store": the working relationships of public health nurses and high-priority families in northern Canadian communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141042
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2010 Oct;25(5):327-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Nancy J Moules
Martha L P MacLeod
Lorraine M Thirsk
Neil Hanlon
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. njmoules@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2010 Oct;25(5):327-34
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Nurse's Practice Patterns - standards - trends
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional Competence
Professional-Family Relations
Public Health Nursing - methods
Quality of Health Care
Rural Health Services - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study is to examine and articulate the nature of working relationships of public health nurses and high-priority families in small communities in northern Canada. Public health nurses working in northern, rural, and remote communities face unique and varied challenges. Reportedly, the hardest part of their job is working with families who have been deemed high priority or high risk. Working with these families in these contexts relies on relationships of reciprocity, trust, and communication. This qualitative research was guided by an interpretive hermeneutic inquiry; 32 families, 25 public health nurses, and three lay home visitors were interviewed from July 2005 through July 2006. Analysis was completed individually and through teamwork of the researchers. Findings suggest that the working relationship of public health nurses and high-priority families in northern communities is complex and multifaceted. Nurses carefully negotiate the process of engaging and entering relationships, maintaining the relationships, and negotiating boundaries. The analysis offers insight into the everyday practices and problems that public health nurses and families encounter in providing care to a vulnerable, isolated, and often marginalized population while navigating the complexity of living and working in the same small communities.
PubMed ID
20816554 View in PubMed
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419 records – page 1 of 42.