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Toward more effective, evidence-based suicide prevention in Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296470
Source
Northern Exposure: Peoples, Powers and Prospects in Canada’s North. Edited by Frances Abele, Thomas J. Courchene, F. Leslie Seidle and Frances St-Hilaire. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. The Art of the State, Vol. 4. p.467-495.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
June 2009
i d e n c e - B a s e d S u i c i d e P r e v e n t i o n i n N u n a v u t 467 Hicks.qxd 27/04/09 09:10 Page 467 region of Nunavut. Rasmussen’s Fifth Thule Expedition also investigated Inuit spiritual beliefs relevant to the taking of one’s own life: The Moon Spirit is one of the
  1 document  
Author
Hicks, Jack
Source
Northern Exposure: Peoples, Powers and Prospects in Canada’s North. Edited by Frances Abele, Thomas J. Courchene, F. Leslie Seidle and Frances St-Hilaire. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. The Art of the State, Vol. 4. p.467-495.
Date
June 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
142577
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Suicide
Notes
ISBN 9780886452056
Documents

Hicks_J_2009_Suicide.pdf

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Addressing tuberculosis among Inuit in Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294606
Source
Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR) March 1, 2008; 44(3-4):82-85.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
did this happen? Using the Territory of Nunavut as a case example, the roots of this situation can largely be traced back to social determinants of health and challenges in access to health care. Half (52%) of all Nunavut residents live in social housing, often under overcrowded conditions. Many
  1 document  
Author
Patterson, M
Finn, S
Barker, K
Source
Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR) March 1, 2008; 44(3-4):82-85.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
812024
Keywords
Inuit
Nunavut
Tuberculosis
Abstract
The average annual rate of tuberculosis (TB) among Inuit in Canada is now more than 290 times higher than Canadian born non-Indigenous people. How did this happen? Using the Territory of Nunavut as a case example, the roots of this situation can largely be traced back to social determinants of health and challenges in access to health care. Half (52%) of all Nunavut residents live in social housing, often under overcrowded conditions. Many experience food insecurity, with food prices in Nunavut that are twice those in southern Canada. Sixty percent of Nunavut residents smoke. Challenges in health care delivery include the small isolated communities, with few roads and difficult weather conditions during the long winters, which impede the ability to reach or provide healthcare, staff that arrive with little TB experience or cultural knowledge, multiple competing health care demands, limited resources and high staff turnover. The housing shortage is not only a social determinant of health, it also impacts the ability to hire new staff or mount an effective response in the event of an outbreak. Yet despite these challenges, progress has been made. Tuberculosis care in Nunavut includes active case finding, contact tracing for all cases of infectious TB, and screening of school age children. Rapid testing with the GeneXpert© platform has resulted in a quicker diagnosis of active TB, earlier treatment (preventing progression of disease) and less transmission. Progressively, there has been a switch from plain film to digital x-rays reducing x-ray turnaround time from as long as two to three weeks to one or two days. Standard treatment protocols include quadruple therapy until sensitivities are known, the use of home isolation for active cases and directly observed treatment (DOT) for both latent and active TB. Special access to rifapentine (Priftin), and its use in combination therapy (3HP), requires only once weekly treatments that can be completed in 12 visits instead of 78 visits for isoniazid (INH) or 120 visits for rifampin, which increases adherence and greatly reduces the health care resources needed to treat TB. In October 2017, the Honourable Jane Philpott, then Minister of Health and now Minister of Indigenous Services, and Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK) announced the establishment of a Task Force to develop an Inuit TB Elimination Action Framework, accompanied by regional action plans. It is hoped that the task force, and current efforts in Nunavut, will lead to the long term changes needed to ultimately eliminate TB among Inuit in Canada.
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Source
The Centre for International Governance Innovation. Policy brief no.27. 11 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
July 2013
POLICY BRIEF NUNAVUT AND THE NEW ARCTIC JOHN HIGGINBOTHAM INTRODUCTION Nunavut is already a special place and rapidly becoming the focal point of Canadian exposure to the melting of the Arctic ice cap and the opportunities and challenges that presents. It is Canada’s northernmost and
  1 document  
Author
Higginbotham, John
Source
The Centre for International Governance Innovation. Policy brief no.27. 11 p.
Date
July 2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
File Size
3060273
Keywords
Nunavut
Arctic
Enviroment
Transportation
Documents
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Factors influencing diet and the food environment in two Inuit communities in Nunavut: Qualitative formative research results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102653
Source
Page 324 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
FACTORS INFLUENCING DIET AND THE FOOD ENVIRONMENT IN TWO INUIT COMMUNITIES IN NUNAVUT, QUALITATIVE FORMATIVE RESEARCH RESULTS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH E. Mead, M. Kratzmann, C. Roache, R. Reid, J. Ogina, J. Gittelsohn, 5. Sharma University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition
  1 document  
Author
Mead, E
Kratzmann, M
Roache, C
Reid, R
Ogina, J
Gittelsohn, J
Sharma, S
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research Institute, Kannapolis, NC
Source
Page 324 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Food security
Inuit
Nunavut
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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The use of Photovoice to document and characterize the food security of users of community food programs in Iqaluit, Nunavut

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101137
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2011 Apr-Jun;11(2):1680
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2011
Author
Lardeau, M
Healey, G
Ford, J
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Department of Geography, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Qaujigiartiit Health Research Network, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2011 Apr-Jun;11(2):1680
Date
Apr-Jun-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Food security
Nunavut
Photovoice
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Food insecurity is a chronic problem affecting Inuit communities. The most comprehensive assessment of Inuit food security to-date, the Inuit Health Survey, reported that 70% of Inuit pre-school children lived in ?food insecure? households. Food banks and soup kitchens are relatively new in the Arctic but the number of users is increasing. Little is known about the experience and determinants of food insecurity among food program users who are often among the most marginalized (socially and economically) in communities. The use of participatory research methods when working in the north of Canada can promote meaningful knowledge exchange with community members and this approach was used in the present ?Photovoice? research. Photovoice uses photography to develop a baseline understanding of an issue, in this case the experience and determinants of food insecurity among users of community food programs in Iqaluit, Nunavut. The target population includes those who face significant social and economic marginalization, an often neglected group in Arctic food systems research. METHODS: Eight regular users of food programs were recruited and engaged in a Photovoice research project to document factors determining their daily food consumption. The research method was introduced in workshops and discussion included the ethical concerns related to photography and how to take pictures. Participants were supplied with digital cameras, and asked to answer the following question using photography: 'What aspects of your everyday life affect what you eat and how much you have to eat?'. In the final workshop, photographs were discussed among the group and participants identified key themes in the photographs, offering an understanding of food insecurity from their perspectives. The group then discussed what should be done with the knowledge gained. RESULTS: Factors improving food security were the customary systems for sharing ?country food?, and the presence of social support networks in the community, such as the Food Bank, the Soup Kitchen and the Tukisigiarvik Center. Factors identified as negatively affecting food security were the high cost of food in the Arctic, and substance abuse. The participants decided by consensus whether and how the knowledge from this project would be disseminated. They decided that a museum exhibit of the photographs in the summer of 2010 and promotion of the results among policy-makers in Nunavut were of high priority. CONCLUSION: The use of participatory research approaches such as Photovoice offers promise for exploring food security issues among similarly disadvantaged and vulnerable populations elsewhere in the Arctic. This approach was found to be a useful method for gathering and sharing research data because the data was generated and analyzed by the participants. The clear and concise messages developed by the participants can be used to inform policy. This research method can assist in making a valuable contribution to health research, both in the Arctic and worldwide, because it promotes an understanding of the experiences of individuals from their own perspective.
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Qimmiliriniq: Inuit sled dogs in Qikiqtaaluk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297007
Source
Qikiqtani Truth Commission. Thematic Reports and Special Studies 1950-1975. 84 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2013
Qikiqtani Truth Commission Thematic Reports and Special Studies 1950–1975 Qimmiliriniq: Inuit Sled Dogs in Qikiqtaaluk Qikiqtani Inuit Association Published by Inhabit Media Inc. www.inhabitmedia.com Inhabit Media Inc. (Iqaluit), P.O. Box 11125, Iqaluit, Nunavut, X0A 1H0 (Toronto
  1 document  
Author
Qikiqtani Inuit Association
Source
Qikiqtani Truth Commission. Thematic Reports and Special Studies 1950-1975. 84 p.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2067231
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Sled dogs
History
Notes
ISBN 978-1-927095-63-8
Documents

thematic_reports_english_qimmiliriniq.pdf

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Unikkaartuit: meanings and experiences of suicide among Inuit in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294482
Source
International Journal of Indigenous Health. 2014; 10(1):55-68.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Suicide Among Inuit • Michael J. Kral, Lori Idlout, J. Bruce Minore, Ronald J. Dyck, Laurence J. Kirmayer International Journal of Indigenous Health, Volume 10, Issue 1, 2014 • 55 Unikkaartuit: Meanings and Experiences of Suicide Among Inuit in Nunavut, Canada REVISED REFERENCES
  1 document  
Author
Kral, Michael J.
Idlout, Lori
Minore, J. Bruce
Dyck, Ronald J.
Kirmayer, Laurence J.
Source
International Journal of Indigenous Health. 2014; 10(1):55-68.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
331552
Keywords
Inuit
Suicide
Colonialism
Trauma
Nunavut
Abstract
Inuit in Arctic Canada have one of the highest suicide rates in the world. Most of these suicides occur among youth, especially males, between the ages of 15 and 24. The goal of this study was to gain an understanding of Inuit experiences with suicide and what suicide means to Inuit, including suicide attempters and bereaved survivors. Fifty Inuit between the ages of 14 and 94 were interviewed about suicides in two communities in Nunavut. Sixty-three high school and college students were also surveyed with the same questions. It was found that suicide was most closely related to romantic relationship and family problems, and to experiences of loneliness and anger. These findings are interpreted in the context of massive social change, on-going colonization, and multigenerational trauma following the colonial government era of the 1950s and 1960s, when family and interpersonal relationships were significantly affected. The study stresses that suicide prevention strategies focus on youth and family, particularly on parenting, and ensure that Inuit communities take control of prevention programs. It recommends that family and community resources be further mobilized for suicide prevention.
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Echoes and reflections : a discussion of best practices in Inuit mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295963
Source
Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescents with Special Needs and Government of Nunavut Task Force on Mental Health.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005
Author
Zamparo, JoAnne
Spraggon, Donna I.M.
Source
Centre of Excellence for Children and Adolescents with Special Needs and Government of Nunavut Task Force on Mental Health.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Nunavut
Children
adolescents
Mental health
Abstract
From introduction: "...The paper begins with a description of the parameters of best practices. There are three views: (a) literature support as theory, (b) definitions that are prescriptive, and (c) successful outcomes. Each view is elaborated and shows the lack of clarity in one singular definition of the concept of best practices. Hopefully, this clarification will allow readers to draw their own conclusions about what the concept of best practices means to them. At the very least, it will certainly provide the readers with an organized inventory of programs considered best practices in the literature..."
Notes
From title page: "A Comparative Cross-Jurisdictional Analysis of the Literature on Services, Program Models, and Best Practices in Mental Health, With a Focus on Interdisciplinary, Intersectoral Approaches Emphasizing Inuit Youth"
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Health beliefs and dietary composition among Inuit living in Nunavut, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102658
Source
Page 326 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
HEAL TH BELIEFS AND DIETARY COMPOSITION AMONG INUIT LIVING IN NUNAVUT, CANADA 5.G. Donaldson, N.C. Doubleday, A. Kushwaha, M. Ip, T. Vlasova, R. Pearce, A. Manning, B. Adlard, D.P. Charette, B. Grimwood, J. Van Oostdam Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada Health
  1 document  
Author
Donaldson, S.G.
Doubleday, N.C.
Kushwaha, A.
Ip, M.
Vlasova, T.
Pearce, R.
Manning, A.
Adlard, B.
Charette, D.P.
Grimwood, B.
Van Oostdam, J.
Author Affiliation
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada
Source
Page 326 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Climate change
Diet
Inuit
Nunavut
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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A community based wildlife health survey in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296439
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session I10.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002 P – I10 A Community Based Wildlife Health Survey in Nunavut, Canada S. Sang*, G. Balch and C. Metcalfe *World Wildlife Fund-Canada, 245 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 410, Toronto, Ontario
  1 document  
Author
Sang, S.
Balch, G.
Metcalfe, C.
Author Affiliation
World Wildlife Fund-Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session I10.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
237472
Keywords
Nunavut
Arctic
Wildlife
Ecosystems
Traditional knowledge
Documents
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224 records – page 1 of 23.