Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

Alcohol, drug use and gambling among the Inuit of Nunavik : epidemiological profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294479
Source
Institut national de santé publique du Québec. Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services/Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux du Nunavik. 17 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
ckw2WÌ? Qanuippitaa? How are we? ckw2WÌ? Qanuippitaa? How are we? alcohol, Drug use anD gamBling among the inuit of nunavik: ePiDemiological Profile ckw2WÌ? Qanuippitaa? How are we? alcohol, Drug use anD gamBling among the inuit of nunavik: ePiDemiological Profile AUTHORS
  1 document  
Author
Muckle, Gina
Boucher, Olivier
Laflamme, Dominique
Chevalier, Serge
Rochette, Louis
Source
Institut national de santé publique du Québec. Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services/Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux du Nunavik. 17 p.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
655918
Keywords
Quebec
Nunavik
Alcohol - use and abuse
drug use
Gambling
Inuit
Documents

657_esi_alcool_drogues_gambling.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Background to the Nunavik Commission health recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301031
Source
Pimatziwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 1(2): p.73-85.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Winter 2003
Author
Tremblay, Marc-Adelard
Author Affiliation
Universite Laval, Department of Anthropology
Source
Pimatziwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 1(2): p.73-85.
Date
Winter 2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Nunavik
Inuit
Health care
Abstract
On November 25, 1999 the Government of Québec, Government of Canada, and Nunavik created the Nunavik Commission. The Commission was co-chaired by Harry Tulugak and André Binette. The other members were: Annie May Popert, Diane Gaumond, Johnny N. Adams, Gérard Duhaime, Marc-Adélard Tremblay and Jules Dufour.
The Commission’s task was to propose an action plan and recommendations on the structure, operation and powers of selfgovernment for the Nunavimiut or Inuit residents in Nunavik, and an implementation timetable. The intent was to table the Report within eight months. It was, however, April 5, 2001, before the complex process could be finished and negotiations toward autonomy are continuing. This is a summary of the background and main recommendations of the Commission relating to health and social services.
Less detail

Country foods health benefits in a changing Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295540
Source
ArcticNet Annual Research Compendium (2012-13). 19 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2013]
Public Health - Denmark); Amélie Bouchard, Elena Labranche (Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services); Serge Déry, Marie-Josee Gauthier (Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services); Kue Young (University of Toronto) Post-Doctoral Fellows Mélanie Lemire (Centre de Recherche du
  1 document  
Author
Dewailly, Eric
Author Affiliation
Universite Laval
Source
ArcticNet Annual Research Compendium (2012-13). 19 pp.
Date
[2013]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1071771
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional diet
Nunavik
Health
Biomarkers
Abstract
To survive in the Arctic, Inuit had for centuries to rely on fish, mammals and some plants such as wild berries and seaweeds. However, since the 1990’s, the consumption of country food has decreased markedly, and the rapid food transition towards a western diet has led to excessive intake of carbohydrate, salt and trans-fatty acids. The obesity prevalence is increasing, and cardiovascular diseases and risk factors have become major health issues. Global environmental changes also affect Inuit dietary patterns in many ways including the availability of local animal and plant species and/or the concentration of environmental contaminants. The traditional country food diet in Nunavik is very rich in key protective nutrients such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and selenium. Wild berries, seaweed and other plants found in Nunavik may provide plant-derived nutrients and secondary metabolites that also offer unique potential for the prevention or management of metabolic disease and associated cardiovascular complications and to offset some deleterious effects of environmental contaminants exposures. Moreover, specific proteins found in fish may contribute to beneficial actions on insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism and inflammation. With a better understanding of the overall benefits of nutrients present in the different country foods consumed in Nunavik, we can better orient public policies aiming to improve country food consumption and food security, promote Inuit culture, minimize the risks from environmental contaminant exposure and the emergence of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in this population and across the Arctic.
Documents
Less detail

Development of risk communication activities and research in Nunavik

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102187
Source
Pages 356-358 in Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Arctic Medical Research vol. 53: Suppl. 2,pp. 356-358, 1994 Development of Risk Communication Activities and Research in Nunavik Suzanne Bruneau and Jacques Grondin Quebec Centre for Public Health, Quebec, Canada Abstract: During the last decades, environmental studies have found
  1 document  
Author
Bruneau, S
Grondin, J
Author Affiliation
Quebec Centre for Public Health, Quebec, Canada
Source
Pages 356-358 in Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Arctic
Contaminants
Environmental health
Food chain
Health hazards
Health Research
Inuit
Nunavik
Risk communication
Abstract
During the last decades, environmental studies have found concerning quantities of contaminants in the Arctic food chain. Increasingly, the Inuit have to deal with the fact that the information available (biological, physical, chemical) is quite difficult to comprehend and often misconstrued through media distortion. In Nunavik, a first step toward community-based environmental risk communications was undertaken. After a preliminary survey found concerning levels of contaminants in breast milk, a detailed research program was initiated and a resource committee was set up to disseminate information on the ongoing research activities and also on the issue of the contamination of the food chain by organochlorines. This communication will present a summary of events linked with the committee's activities and a discussion on the uneasy task of communicating risks.
Documents
Less detail

From Nouveau-Québec to Nunavik and Eeyou Istchee: the political economy of Northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294478
Source
The Northern Review. 2014; 38:93-112.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
93The Northern Review 38 (2014): 93–112 From Nouveau-Québec to Nunavik and Eeyou Istchee: The Poli cal Economy of Northern Quebec Thierry Rodon Abstract: The Inuit and the Crees of Quebec have travelled an impressive path from a self-sustaining economy to a land claims economy based mainly
  1 document  
Author
Rodon, Thierry
Source
The Northern Review. 2014; 38:93-112.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
296545
Keywords
Quebec
Inuit
Nunavik
Eeyou Istchee
Crees
Abstract
The Inuit and the Crees of Quebec have travelled an impressive path from a self-sustaining economy to a land claims economy based mainly on public transfers. But most importantly, they have created two new regions in Quebec: Nunavik and Eeyou Istchee. This article analyzes the political and economic development of these two Quebec regions. After a look at the legacy of the James Bay development and the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, the first modern Canadian treaty, this article endeavours to assess the new development plan announced by Quebec: the Plan Nord. On the surface, the Plan Nord resembles a new incarnation of the James Bay project, but there are many differences: the development is not spearheaded by the Quebec government and, more importantly, Aboriginal leaders are now involved, a good indication of the changes that have occurred in the last forty years. However, does this mean that the North will benefit from the new development? Since the 1940s, all development in Nunavik and Eeyou Istchee has come from the outside. Plan Nord is simply the latest in a long series of exogenous development projects, making it difficult for people in the North to shape their own fate.
Documents

327-1-883-1-10-20150309.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Genome-wide association analysis identifies new candidate risk loci for familial intracranial aneurysm in the French-Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294017
Source
Scientific Reports. 2018 Mar 12;8(1):4356. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-21603-7.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2018
Author
Zhou S
Gan-Or Z
Ambalavanan A
Lai D
Xie P
Bourassa CV
Strong S
Ross JP
Dionne-Laporte A
Spiegelman D
Dupré N
Foroud TM
Xiong L
Dion PA
Rouleau GA
Source
Scientific Reports. 2018 Mar 12;8(1):4356. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-21603-7.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Nunavik
Inuit
Abstract
Intracranial Aneurysm (IA) is a common disease with a worldwide prevalence of 1-3%. In the French-Canadian (FC) population, where there is an important founder effect, the incidence of IA is higher and is frequently seen in families. In this study, we genotyped a cohort of 257 mostly familial FC IA patients and 1,992 FC controls using the Illumina NeuroX SNP-chip. The most strongly associated loci were tested in 34 Inuit IA families and in 32 FC IA patients and 106 FC controls that had been exome sequenced (WES). After imputation, one locus at 3p14.2 (FHIT, rs1554600, p?=?4.66?×?10-9) reached a genome-wide significant level of association and a subsequent validation in Nunavik Inuit cohort further confirmed the significance of the FHIT variant association (rs780365, FBAT-O, p?=?0.002839). Additionally, among the other promising loci (p?
PubMed ID
29531279 View in PubMed
Less detail

A health profile of the Inuit of Nunavik: report of the Santé Québec Health Survey (1992)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2920
Source
Pages 630-635 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
A Health Profile of the Inuit of Nunavik: Report of the Sante Quebec Health Survey (1992) Mireille Jette Sante Quebec, Montreal, Canada Abstract: This general survey of health and well-being aimed primarily to provide a comprehensive insight into the health and social situation in Nunavik
  1 document  
Author
Jetté, M.
Jette, M
Author Affiliation
Sante Quebec, Montreal, Canada
Source
Pages 630-635 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Contaminants
Cultural values
Health status surveys
Inuit
Mental health
Nunavik
Sante Quebec Health Survey
Abstract
This general survey of health and well-being aimed primarily to provide a comprehensive insight into the health and social situation in Nunavik, with a view to setting up prevention and intervention programs more properly adapted to the needs of the Inuit of Nunavik. The data gathered through the use of questionnaires were combined with the anthropometric and biological readings of some 1,567 Inuit of all ages to generate the survey findings. In essence, the report demonstrated that, as the current Inuit lifestyle, save for the consumption of traditional foods, was setting the stage for the development of several types of illness previously absent from Nunavik, behavioral changes were warranted. Although the Inuit reported few problems of a physical nature, mental health issues appeared challenging. The prevalence of psychological distress, suicidal thoughts, and parasuicides was of sufficient import to justify direct, concerted, and immediate action.
Documents
Less detail
Source
Société d'Habitation du Québec. 38 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2014
SOCIÉTÉ D’HABITATION DU QUÉBEC HOUSING IN NUNAVIK INFORMATION DOCUMENT WWW.HABITATION.GOUV.QC.CA Content and editorial coordination Department of Intergouvernemental and Aboriginal Affairs Publication coordination Communications Branch Cover photo Xavier Dachez Société
  1 document  
Source
Société d'Habitation du Québec. 38 p.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
8790397
Keywords
Nunavik
Government housing
Social housing
Private housing
Documents

logement__nunavik_2014.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

Incidence of type-specific HPV in a population of Inuit women in Nunavik, Quebec

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96145
Source
Pages 81-82 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
INCIDENCE OF TYPE-SPECIFIC HPV IN A POPULATION OF INUITWOMEN IN NUNAVIK, QUEBEC R. Bennett2, E. Coutle3'4, M. Roger4, E.L. Franco2'3, P. Brassard 1' 2 1Departments of Medicine, 2Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health, and 30ncology, McGill University; and of 4Microbiology, Centre
  1 document  
Author
Bennett, R.
Coutle, E.
Roger, M.
Franco, E.L.
Brassard, P.
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health, and Oncology, McGill University
Department of Microbiology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Source
Pages 81-82 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cervical cancer
HPV genotypes
Human papillomavirus (HPV)
Inuit women
Nunavik, Quebec
Oncogenic risk grouping
Patterns of HPV acquisition
Phylogenetic alpha-papillomavirus species
Prevention strategies
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 2. Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health.
Documents
Less detail

Inuit ethnobotany and ethnoecology in Nunavik and Nunatsiavut, northeastern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300854
Source
Universite´ de Montre´al (Faculte´ des arts et des sciences).
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2012
Author
Clark, Courtenay
Source
Universite´ de Montre´al (Faculte´ des arts et des sciences).
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Dissertation
Keywords
Nunavik
Inuit
Traditional knowledge
Ethnobotany
Landscape ethnoecology
Medicinal plants
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.