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61 records – page 1 of 7.

15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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[Association of renal carcinoma and the exposure to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18460
Source
Actas Urol Esp. 2003 Feb;27(2):164-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
A. Blanco Espinosa
M. Leva Vallejo
F. Merlo de la Peña
P. Moreno Arcas
J L Carazo Carazo
M J Requena Tapia
Author Affiliation
Servicio de Urología, Hospital Regional Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba.
Source
Actas Urol Esp. 2003 Feb;27(2):164-7
Date
Feb-2003
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Allelic Imbalance
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 - genetics
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
English Abstract
Female
Genes, ras
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Nuclear Reactors
Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen - analysis
Spain
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
After the nuclear accident of Chernobyl, in the population of zones contaminated the malignant renal tumors was increased from 4.7 to 7.5 per 100,000 of total population. Cesium 137 (137Cs) constitutes 80-90% of the internal exposure of these people as well as eliminated through kidneys becomes an important risk factor. We present a case of a patient, residing in radiocontamined area, who consulted for abdominal pain and left flank mass. We review relevant literature and the management of these patients.
PubMed ID
12731334 View in PubMed
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Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 May 26;93(21):9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1993

Chernobyl and iodine deficiency in the Russian Federation: an environmental disaster leading to a public health opportunity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18677
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2002;23(4):453-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Richard J Jackson
David M DeLozier
Gregory Gerasimov
Olga Borisova
Paul L Garbe
Lioudmila Goultchenko
George Shakarishvili
Joseph G Hollowell
Dayton T Miller
Author Affiliation
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, NE-Mail Stop F-29, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3717, USA.
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2002;23(4):453-70
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Deficiency Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Goiter, Endemic - complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Iodine - deficiency - radiation effects - supply & distribution - urine
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Public Policy
Russia - epidemiology
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - supply & distribution
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear disaster of April 26, 1986, triggered a chain of devastating events that later included an unexpected increase in childhood thyroid cancer and evidence of iodine deficiency (ID) in Russia. For the Russian people the Chernobyl event had profound psychological impacts, provoking anxiety about nuclear technology and mistrust of governmental control efforts. Frequently in public health a crisis is required to create the political will to manage longstanding problems, and public health officials must rapidly mobilize to take advantage of the opportunity. In this case, ID, previously not seen as a problem in Russia, was recognized to be potentially serious, and the Russian Federation, assisted by the catalytic bi-national effort of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Economic and Technological Cooperation (Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission (GCC)) established a model salt iodization policy, developed a planning process, and implemented a program to prevent ID through a systematic approach that included the people, government, and private groups using open communication, dissemination of the findings, and action plans. By 1999, political will had been mobilized and over 20% of the nation's salt was being iodized, up from about 1% in 1996. Universal iodization of salt was not a specific objective of the GCC; however, the increasing availability of iodized salt is leading to the elimination of ID, which is now a political goal in Russia. The full realization of this goal will require more time for education, marketing, and possibly legislative action.
PubMed ID
12532684 View in PubMed
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The Chernobyl disaster: cancer following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16946
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2005;27:56-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M. Hatch
E. Ron
A. Bouville
L. Zablotska
G. Howe
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD 20852, USA. hatchm@mail.nih.gov
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2005;27:56-66
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - classification - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiometry
Ukraine - epidemiology
PubMed ID
15958427 View in PubMed
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[Chernobyl--from a forgotten hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24033
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 May 26;93(21):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1993

Chernobyl-related ionising radiation exposure and cancer risk: an epidemiological review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19088
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2002 May;3(5):269-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Kirsten B Moysich
Ravi J Menezes
Arthur M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Prevention, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14226, USA. kirsten.moyisch@roswellpark.org
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2002 May;3(5):269-79
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Air Pollution, Radioactive
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radiation, Ionizing
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear accident on 26th April, 1986, led to a massive release of radionuclides into the environment. Although vast areas of Europe were affected by Chernobyl-related ionising radiation, the accident had the greatest impact in Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation. Epidemiological studies that have investigated the link between the Chernobyl accident and cancer have largely focused on malignant diseases in children, specifically thyroid cancer and leukaemia. There is good evidence to suggest that rates of thyroid cancer in children from the countries that were formally part of the Soviet Union have risen as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. The findings for childhood leukaemia are less conclusive. Overall rates for this disease do not seem to have been affected by the Chernobyl-related ionising radiation, but there may be a larger risk of infant leukaemia in contaminated areas of Europe. Among adult populations, there is no strong evidence to suggest that risk of thyroid cancer, leukaemia, or other malignant disease has increased as a result of the Chernobyl accident.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Oncol. 2002 Sep;3(9):527-812217789
PubMed ID
12067803 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.