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The 6th Klaas Breur memorial lecture, 1987. The Chernobyl accident--impact Western Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25858
Source
Radiother Oncol. 1988 May;12(1):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988

15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35663
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
M. Hoshi
Y. Shibata
S. Okajima
T. Takatsuji
S. Yamashita
H. Namba
N. Yokoyama
M. Izumi
S. Nagataki
K. Fujimura
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University, Japan.
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The level of radiation exposure in children in Belarus caused by the Chernobyl accident was investigated on the basis of whole body 137Cs count. The subjects were 10,062 children (4,762 boys and 5,300 girls) in Mogilev and Gomel, Belarus, who received Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project health examinations from May 1991 to December 1992 and who were 5-16 y old at the time of examination. The median whole body 137Cs count per body weight varied from 21-48 Bq kg-1 and from 28-126 Bq kg-1 in Mogilev oblast and Gomel oblast, respectively. (The "oblast" is the largest administrative district constituting the country. Belarus consists of 6 oblasts). Corresponding annual effective dose equivalents were all less than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y-1, but the observed levels in the children were considerably higher than the average level of 2.3 Bq kg-1 reported in the past for the former Soviet Union.
Notes
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-57730075
PubMed ID
8056594 View in PubMed
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Analysis of multiaberrant cells in lymphocytes of persons living in different ecological regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59438
Source
Mutat Res. 1994 Jan-Feb;323(1-2):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
N P Bochkov
L D Katosova
Author Affiliation
Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy, Russia.
Source
Mutat Res. 1994 Jan-Feb;323(1-2):7-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Cells, Cultured
Chromosome Aberrations
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lymphocytes - drug effects - radiation effects
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Exposure
Radioactive Pollutants - toxicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
An analysis was carried out of multiaberrant ("rogue") cells in lymphocytes of persons living in unpolluted areas (controls), and in areas chemically or radioactively (Chernobyl fall-out) polluted. The total number of analysed cells was 102,391, among these 10 cells with three and more aberrations were found. These multiaberrant cells occur in persons of both sexes and various ages living in regions with a moderate degree of mutagenic exposure. The main types of aberrations in multiaberrant cells were chromosome exchanges, accompanied by double fragments.
PubMed ID
7508570 View in PubMed
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An increased incidence of tumour bearing Swiss albino mice in Durham after the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24504
Source
In Vivo. 1992 Mar-Apr;6(2):237-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
B N Hemsworth
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Durham, England.
Source
In Vivo. 1992 Mar-Apr;6(2):237-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adenoma - etiology
Animals
Animals, Laboratory
England
Female
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
Lymphoma, Diffuse - etiology
Lymphoma, Large-Cell - etiology
Male
Mice
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology - pathology
Nuclear Reactors
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reticuloendothelial System - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Mice which were alive in Durham at the time of the Chernobyl nuclear accident presented a highly significant increase in the incidence of those which bore tumours. The comparison is based upon mice which were studied over the previous 4 years. In males and females the increase amounted to 19 and 100 per cent respectively. The most frequent neoplasms to increase were malignant tumours of the reticuloendothelial system and of the reticuloses, lymphosarcoma and reticulum cell sarcoma were prevalent in mice kept after Chernobyl. The incidence of reticuloses increased by 24 and 18 per cent in males and females respectively.
PubMed ID
1525346 View in PubMed
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Birth defects in Norway by levels of external and food-based exposure to radiation from Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59591
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1992
Author
R T Lie
L M Irgens
R. Skjaerven
J B Reitan
P. Strand
T. Strand
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Date
Aug-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Down Syndrome - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Hydrocephalus - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
In Norway, external doses of radiation resulting from fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident were estimated from detailed measurements, including soil deposition patterns. Internal doses were estimated from measurements of radioactive cesium in meat and milk supplies. The doses were calculated as average monthly doses for each of 454 municipalities during 36 consecutive months after the accident in spring 1986. Prospectively collected data on all newborns listed in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway who were conceived in the period May 1983-April 1989 were used to assess possible dose-response relations between estimated external and food-based exposures and congenital malformations and some other conditions. A positive association was observed between total radiation dose (external plus food-based) and hydrocephaly, while a negative association was observed for Down's syndrome. However, an important conclusion of the study was that no associations were found for conditions previously reported to be associated with radiation, i.e., small head circumference, congenital cataracts, anencephaly, spina bifida, and low birth weight. Potential sources of bias, including exposure misclassification and incomplete ascertainment of cases, are discussed.
PubMed ID
1415157 View in PubMed
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Caesium contamination in human milk and transfer factor from diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64988
Source
Analyst. 1992 Mar;117(3):511-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S. Risica
G. Campos Venuti
A. Rogani
D. Baronciani
M. Petrone
Author Affiliation
Laboratorio di Fisica, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.
Source
Analyst. 1992 Mar;117(3):511-4
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Female
Food contamination, radioactive
Geography
Humans
Italy
Milk, human - chemistry
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Transfer Factor - analysis
Ukraine
Abstract
A study on caesium contamination in human milk, as a consequence of the Chernobyl fallout, was conducted in 1989 on a group of women from one of the areas of northern Italy most heavily affected by the radioactive fallout. Their diet was studied, and the caesium intake was calculated by using the mean food activity concentration in that area. The caesium transfer factor was evaluated both as the ratio of caesium concentration in mother's milk to the daily intake, and by using a simplified milk compartment model.
PubMed ID
1580391 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl accident: retrospective and prospective estimates of external dose of the population of Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31728
Source
Health Phys. 2002 Mar;82(3):290-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Ilya A Likhtarev
Leonila N Kovgan
Peter Jacob
Lynn R Anspaugh
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Institute, Ukrainian Academy of Technological Sciences, Kyiv. likh@rpi.kiev.ua
Source
Health Phys. 2002 Mar;82(3):290-303
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cesium radioisotopes
Child
Child, Preschool
Gamma Rays
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Following the Chernobyl accident many activities were conducted in Ukraine in order to define the radiological impact. Considered here are gamma spectrometric analyses of soil-depth-profile samples taken in the years 1988-1999, gamma spectrometric measurements of radionuclide concentration in soil samples taken in 1986, and measurements of external gamma-exposure rate in air. These data are analyzed in this paper to derive a "reference" radionuclide composition and an attenuation function for the time-dependent rate of external gamma exposure that changes due to the migration of radiocesium into the soil column. An attenuation function for cesium is derived that consists of two exponential functions with half lives of 1.5 and 50 y. The dependencies of attenuation on direction and distance from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant are also demonstrated. On the basis of these analyses the average individual and collective external gamma doses for the population of Ukraine are derived for 1986, 1986-2000, and 1986-2055. For the 1.4 million persons living in rural areas with 137Cs contamination of >37 kBq m(-2), the collective effective dose from external exposure is estimated to be 7,500 person-Sv by the end of 2000. A critical group of 22,500 persons who received individual doses of >20 mSv is identified for consideration of increased social and medical attention.
PubMed ID
11845832 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl fallout: internal doses to the Norwegian population and the effect of dietary advice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62152
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Oct;63(4):385-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
P. Strand
T D Selnaes
E. Bøe
O. Harbitz
A. Andersson-Sørlie
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Osterås, Norway.
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Oct;63(4):385-92
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium radioisotopes
Diet
Female
Food contamination, radioactive
Humans
Male
Norway
Nuclear Reactors
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
Dietary studies and whole-body measurements were used to estimate the intake of radiocesium and the radiation dose received by different groups of people in Norway after the Chernobyl accident. Freshwater fish, milk, and reindeer meat were the major sources for radiocesium intake. Dietary advice, together with agricultural decontamination measures, resulted in a considerable reduction in the exposure level of the population. A majority (40-80%) of the specially selected groups (farmers-hunters and Sami reindeer herdsman) changed its diet significantly after the accident. Without dietary changes, specifically a reduction in the consumption of freshwater fish and reindeer meat, the Sami group would have had a 400-700% higher radiocesium intake, and the farmers-hunters' intake would have been up to 50% higher than what they actually had experienced.
PubMed ID
1526778 View in PubMed
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Childhood leukaemia following the Chernobyl accident: the European Childhood Leukaemia-Lymphoma Incidence Study (ECLIS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24601
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1992;29A(1):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D M Parkin
E. Cardis
E. Masuyer
H P Friedl
H. Hansluwka
D. Bobev
E. Ivanov
J. Sinnaeve
J. Augustin
I. Plesko
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 1992;29A(1):87-95
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Lymphoma - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of the European Childhood Leukaemia-Lymphoma Incidence Study (ECLIS) is to investigate trends in incidence rates of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma in Europe, in relation to the exposure to radiation which resulted from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986. In this first report, the incidence of leukaemia in children aged 0-14 is presented from cancer registries in 20 European countries for the period 1980-1988. Risk of leukaemia in 1987-1988 (8-32 months post-accident) relative to that before 1986, is compared with estimated average dose of radiation received by the population in 30 geographic areas. The observed changes in incidence do not relate to exposure. The period of follow-up is so far rather brief, and the study is planned to continue for at least 10 years.
PubMed ID
1445751 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.