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133 records – page 1 of 14.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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131I dose to the human fetal thyroid in the Zagreb district, Yugoslavia, from the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65399
Source
Int J Radiat Biol. 1988 Aug;54(2):167-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
M. Basic
B. Kasal
I. Simonovic
S. Jukic
Author Affiliation
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Hospital Centre-Rebro and Medical Faculty, Zagreb, Yugoslavia.
Source
Int J Radiat Biol. 1988 Aug;54(2):167-77
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Female
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - metabolism
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Ukraine
Yugoslavia
Abstract
The 131I activity was measured in 30 human fetal thyroids in Zagreb district after the Chernobyl accident. A model of radioiodine metabolism in the mother and human fetus which takes into account the age dependence of the uptake and retention of radioiodine in the fetal thyroid was developed. Having assessed that the total intake by the average mother was about 1330 Bq, a good correlation between calculated and measured fetal thyroid activities was found (r = 0.77, P less than 0.001). The fetal thyroid dose reached the maximum of 0.43 micro Gy/Bq intake at about the fifth month of gestation. It was concluded that the risk of having a child with a harmful trait due to 131I absorbed by the mother was negligible.
PubMed ID
2900274 View in PubMed
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The 1986 and 1988 UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) reports: findings and implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25247
Source
Health Phys. 1990 Mar;58(3):241-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
F A Mettler
W K Sinclair
L. Anspaugh
C. Edington
J H Harley
R C Ricks
P B Selby
E W Webster
H O Wyckoff
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131.
Source
Health Phys. 1990 Mar;58(3):241-50
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Background Radiation
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Japan
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Genetics
Radiation, Ionizing
Risk
Ukraine
Abstract
The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has published a substantive series of reports concerning sources, effects, and risks of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the highlights and conclusions from the most recent 1986 and 1988 reports. The present annual per person effective dose equivalent for the world's population is about 3 mSv. The majority of this (2.4 mSv) comes from natural background, and 0.4 to 1 mSv is from medical exposures. Other sources contribute less than 0.02 mSv annually. The worldwide collective effective dose equivalent annually is between 13 and 16 million person-Sv. The Committee assessed the collective effective dose equivalent to the population of the northern hemisphere from the reactor accident at Chernobyl and concluded that this is about 600,000 person-Sv. The Committee also reviewed risk estimates for radiation carcinogenesis which included the new Japanese dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These data indicate that risk coefficient estimates for high doses and high dose rate low-LET radiation in the Japanese population are approximately 3-10% Sv-1, depending on the projection model utilized. The Committee also indicated that, in calculation of such risks at low doses and low dose rates, a risk-reduction factor in the range of 2-10 may be considered.
PubMed ID
2312289 View in PubMed
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[A computing laboratory-clinical system in the screening of malignant tumors: study of the state of the antioxidant system and level of cellular proliferation markers among the population from the Chernobyl AES accident area]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24950
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
N A Grigorovich
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):36-40
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Antioxidants
Biological Markers
English Abstract
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - diagnosis - prevention & control
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Risk factors
Software
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
The author bases and describes the computing laboratory and clinical system for screening groups at a higher risk for malignant neoplasms whose incidence is likely to increase due to irradiation. Two years after the disaster the detected group at a higher risk was 2-2.4 times larger than the control group among persons who received the total irradiation dose 5 rem and over as well as among persons who are to be removed from the area polluted with radionuclides whatever the dose. As the time elapsed since the disaster increases, the number of subjects with a higher level of biomarkers also grows. It is advisable that this system be introduced in all fields of the practical health care in the polluted and control areas to carry out goal-oriented treatment and diagnostic measures in the selected population groups.
PubMed ID
1950158 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of current occupational standards for protecting the health of nuclear workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24709
Source
Occup Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;6(4):725-39
Publication Type
Article
Author
B E Lambert
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Biology, Medical College of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, University of London, England.
Source
Occup Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;6(4):725-39
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection - standards
Abstract
It will be clear from the aforegoing that occupational standards have varied over the past 30-40 years since the beginnings of the nuclear industry. Our perception of risk rates for cancer mortality and genetic effects has changed, such that the rates have been constantly revised upwards. Logically, dose limits should have been reduced in proportion, but this assumes a constant approach to the "tolerability" or "acceptability" of risk and this has not been demonstrated. Dose limits are not seen by management in the nuclear industry as the only plank in the structure of radiation protection; emphasis is also being given to the "optimization" ethic. In these circumstances a good test of the efficacy of the system of radiation control in limiting health effects is needed. As can be seen, no such study is available and, given the doses received and the numbers of workers involved, it is unlikely that any epidemiologic study, apart from studies on miners, will have sufficient statistical power to be totally unequivocal. However, some studies have shown cancer mortality associations with radiation exposure that are significant. Probably the best way to mitigate the inherent drawbacks in these studies is to pool data-sets, and this is being done. Other improvements will include estimates of cancer incidence in countries with cancer registries (e.g., U.K., Canada, and Sweden) and to perhaps go beyond epidemiologic data to consider sensitive biologic markers as indices of exposure. Overall the conclusion must be that the radiation industry cannot be complacent and for some tasks in the processes involved (e.g., uranium mining) there is strong evidence of a history of unacceptable health effects occurring.
PubMed ID
1962255 View in PubMed
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[A morphogenetic analysis of a callus culture of Nicotiana tabacum L. in chronic irradiation of the plants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69089
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1993 Jan-Feb;27(1):63-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Konopleva
D M Grodzinskii
L V Zheltonozhskaia
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1993 Jan-Feb;27(1):63-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Nuclear Reactors
Plants, Toxic
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Time Factors
Tobacco - anatomy & histology - genetics - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The callus culture of Nicotiana tabacum L. was obtained from the plants chronically irradiated in 10 km zone of Chernobyl Atomic Power Station. The tobacco plants in 10 km zone of Chernobyl during the vegetation period exposed to irradiation with the average dose rate of 0.36 mA/kg (5 mP/h). The total absorbed dose was approximately 0,31 Gy. The morphogenetic analysis of this culture shows a considerable decrease of regeneration index and callus weight.
PubMed ID
8316955 View in PubMed
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Analysis of body-burden measurements of 137Cs and 40K in a Japanese group over a period of 5 years following the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75071
Source
Health Phys. 1996 Sep;71(3):320-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
M. Uchiyama
Y. Nakamura
S. Kobayashi
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-shi, Japan.
Source
Health Phys. 1996 Sep;71(3):320-5
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Body Burden
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Humans
Japan
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Potassium Radioisotopes - analysis
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
A selected group of about 20 male researchers at the NIRS that reside in Chiba, Japan, was measured for total body content of radiocesium and 40K every 3 mo from February 1986 to May 1991. A whole-body counter at the NIRS was used to measure their radioactivity in a scanning mode of 5 cm min-1 in a shielded iron room with walls 20 cm in thickness. A maximum radiocesium level of 59 Bq was observed in May 1987. The annual change in the body burden decreased with an apparent half-time of 1.8 y after May 1987. The period of five years was sufficient to eliminate the effects of the accident in this group. Even in the most contaminated period, the dose from radiocesium was below 2 microSv y-1. The cumulative dose for 5 y was estimated to be 5.6 microSv, which is nearly equal to the total dose to the Japanese people caused by the artificial radionuclide fallout for the first year following the accident. It is much smaller than the committed dose of 82 microSv for internally deposited 137Cs resulting from nuclear explosions in 1961 and 1962 and the annual dose of 170 microSv from internal 40K. No detectable health risk was expected for the present group.
PubMed ID
8698573 View in PubMed
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[An assessment of the permissible level of a mixture of radionuclides from the Chernobyl fallout in human lungs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73504
Source
Radiobiologiia. 1992 Mar-Apr;32(2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
A K Sukhoruchkin
Source
Radiobiologiia. 1992 Mar-Apr;32(2):163-71
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Aerosols
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects - analysis
English Abstract
Female
Health Physics
Humans
Lung - radiation effects
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects - analysis
Radioisotopes - adverse effects - analysis
Solubility
Ukraine
Abstract
The permissible level of a radionuclide mixture, resulted from the Chernobyl burst, in the human being lungs was determined for two kinds of compounds: absolutely insoluble compounds and soluble compounds in the state of equilibrium. For this purpose the data were used concerning the radionuclide composition and aerosol disperse in lower atmosphere which were obtained by the Department for Dosimetric Control (NPO "Pripiat'"). The results of measurements of 137Cs content taken by the use of human radiation spectrometer (HRS) needed an adequate estimation: low level of 137Cs in the human lungs and body within the Chernobyl NPP, zone does not guarantee radiation security. The notion "permissible content" and the possibility of using thereof in the individual dosimetric control are discussed.
PubMed ID
1598388 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of oncogenic risk of the irradiation of the thyroid gland in humans]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24951
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
I A Zvonova
I A Likhtarev
I V Filiushkin
N K Shandala
G M Gul'ko
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):32-6
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
The paper deals with one of the most urgent aspects of irradiation hygiene, namely assessment of risk for irradiation-induced cancers of the thyroid. A model is described to predict high mortality rates of thyroidal cancer in the population due to the catastrophe at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Station. With the model, life-time risk rates involving sex and age at the moment of irradiation, as well as an irradiation mode.
PubMed ID
1950157 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the immunohematological status of children exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the early and late periods after the Chernobyl AES accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37396
Source
Pediatriia. 1991;(12):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
V G Bebeshko
A A Chumak
E M Bruslova
V V Tal'ko
Zh N Minchenko
D A Bazyka
N M Tsvetkova
A G Bezpalenko
E N Dzhurinskaia
Source
Pediatriia. 1991;(12):16-20
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
The qualitative and quantitative parameters of hemopoiesis and immunocompetent cells were studied in 365 children in the early "iodine" and long-term periods after the accident. In accordance with primary response, a group consisting of 28 subjects with so-called "radiation injury" was distinguished. The early period was marked by unusual qualitative and quantitative hematological changes which, however, did not lead to the development of the hematological syndrome characteristic of acute radiation injury. Certain deviations that corresponded to somatic pathology were detectable at the late periods after the accident.
PubMed ID
1788014 View in PubMed
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133 records – page 1 of 14.