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29 records – page 1 of 3.

[Assessment of oncogenic risk of the irradiation of the thyroid gland in humans]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24951
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
I A Zvonova
I A Likhtarev
I V Filiushkin
N K Shandala
G M Gul'ko
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):32-6
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
The paper deals with one of the most urgent aspects of irradiation hygiene, namely assessment of risk for irradiation-induced cancers of the thyroid. A model is described to predict high mortality rates of thyroidal cancer in the population due to the catastrophe at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Station. With the model, life-time risk rates involving sex and age at the moment of irradiation, as well as an irradiation mode.
PubMed ID
1950157 View in PubMed
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[Biological effects and risks of accidental radionuclide uptake]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26488
Source
Acta Med Austriaca. 1986;13(4-5):86-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
G F Fueger
Source
Acta Med Austriaca. 1986;13(4-5):86-93
Date
1986
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Austria
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Child
English Abstract
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Osteoradionecrosis - etiology
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - etiology
Risk
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology
Ukraine
Whole-Body Irradiation
Abstract
This review presents the actual state of knowledge about medical dangers of a radioactive fall-out. Concepts for the estimation of accidental incorporation, as well as effects and risks that are known to occur after incorporation of radionuclides are discussed. Special attention is paid to the following topics: effect of radioiodine on the thyroid gland, effect of radio-cesium on whole body burden, alpha-emitting particles (plutonium) with deposition in the airways, association of osteotrope radionuclides (strontium) with malignomas of the skeleton and finally prophylaxis with iodine to prevent damage of the thyroid.
PubMed ID
3554876 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk assessments in light of Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26284
Source
Nature. 1986 Oct 16-22;323(6089):585-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
R R Jones
Source
Nature. 1986 Oct 16-22;323(6089):585-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Risk
Ukraine
PubMed ID
3773988 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer risk estimation in Belarussian children due to thyroid irradiation as a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22592
Source
Health Phys. 1996 Jul;71(1):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
E E Buglova
J E Kenigsberg
N V Sergeeva
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Radiation Medicine, Minsk, Belarus.
Source
Health Phys. 1996 Jul;71(1):45-9
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Byelarus
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Risk
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology
Ukraine
Abstract
The thyroid doses received by the juvenile population of Belarus following the Chernobyl accident ranged up to about 10 Gy. The thyroid cancer risk estimate recommended in NCRP Report No. 80 was used to predict the number of thyroid cancer cases among children during 1990-1992 in selected Belarussian regions and cities. The results obtained using this risk estimate show an excess of thyroid cancer cases being registered vs. the predicted cases. Thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys under investigation is higher than among girls in the postaccident period. The excess of the observed over the expected incidence in the general juvenile population is caused by the high thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys. These results, which can be considered part of the first stage of a thorough thyroid cancer risk estimation after the Chernobyl accident, demonstrate the critical need to complete these studies in depth.
PubMed ID
8655329 View in PubMed
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Source
Science. 1986 Sep 5;233(4768):1029-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-1986

Chernobyl three years later: radiobiologic evaluation of a radioactive contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25094
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 1990 Nov-Dec;10(6):281-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Behar
F. Cohen-Boulakia
S. Othmani
Author Affiliation
Department of Biophysics, University Medical Center Broussais Hotel-Dieu, University of Paris VI, France.
Source
J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 1990 Nov-Dec;10(6):281-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
USSR
Ukraine
Abstract
On April 26, 1986, after partial fusion and confining loss by explosion of a nuclear reactor, 5 x 10(7) Ci of radionuclides escaped from Chernobyl. Three years later, maps show contamination by radioactive isotopes (formed during that period) of 21,000 km2 of Soviet soil, mainly in Byelorussia and part of the Ukraine. Decontamination measures have not been effective to date and 135,000 persons are being followed medically, taking into account the radioactive doses they received. An initial excess of morbidity from solid tumors has been noted much sooner than in the case of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but its significance is in dispute. Three years later, only the extent of the ecologic disaster caused by the radioactive contamination can be confirmed. It is too early to draw conclusions about radiation-induced carcinogenesis for the contaminated population.
PubMed ID
2095410 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Med J Aust. 1991 Dec 2-16;155(11-12):764-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M R Kidd
Author Affiliation
Monash University Department of Community Medicine, East Bentleigh, VIC.
Source
Med J Aust. 1991 Dec 2-16;155(11-12):764-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Adult
Australia
Child
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Nutrition Disorders - etiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Travel
Ukraine
Abstract
During the past twelve months much media attention has been focused on the plight of the children affected by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in the Soviet Union. The visit to Australia by several groups of these children during 1991 has heightened community interest in the innocent victims of the world's worst nuclear accident. As medical adviser for one of these visits, I saw how some of the children of Chernobyl benefited from their holiday away from radioactivity.
PubMed ID
1745168 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.