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22 records – page 1 of 3.

15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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[Activities of the Byelorussian scientific association of phthisiatrists and the phthisiatric organization of the Republic in the circumstances of complicated critical state of tuberculosis in connection with the Chernobyl AES accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36884
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1992;(1-2):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

[A preliminary analysis of oral morbidity in the children of Byelarus after the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36318
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1993 Apr-Jun;72(2):67-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E M Mel'nichenko
L I Leus
K A Gorbacheva
L P Belik
E M Gul'ko
T K Ostromentskaia
O V Pyleva
L V Shuglia
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1993 Apr-Jun;72(2):67-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Air Pollution, Radioactive - adverse effects
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Ecology
English Abstract
Humans
Incidence
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology
Ukraine
Abstract
Presents the data of analysis of medical files of therapeutic institutions, of questionnaires distributed among dentists, and the results of examinations of 883 children aged 3 to 6, living in 19 towns of Byelorussia. The incidence and clinical picture of a number of dental diseases were found changed in the children living in the regions contaminated with radionuclides, as well as the general well-being of these children.
PubMed ID
8048139 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl and iodine deficiency in the Russian Federation: an environmental disaster leading to a public health opportunity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18677
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2002;23(4):453-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Richard J Jackson
David M DeLozier
Gregory Gerasimov
Olga Borisova
Paul L Garbe
Lioudmila Goultchenko
George Shakarishvili
Joseph G Hollowell
Dayton T Miller
Author Affiliation
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, NE-Mail Stop F-29, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3717, USA.
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2002;23(4):453-70
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Deficiency Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Goiter, Endemic - complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Iodine - deficiency - radiation effects - supply & distribution - urine
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Public Policy
Russia - epidemiology
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - supply & distribution
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear disaster of April 26, 1986, triggered a chain of devastating events that later included an unexpected increase in childhood thyroid cancer and evidence of iodine deficiency (ID) in Russia. For the Russian people the Chernobyl event had profound psychological impacts, provoking anxiety about nuclear technology and mistrust of governmental control efforts. Frequently in public health a crisis is required to create the political will to manage longstanding problems, and public health officials must rapidly mobilize to take advantage of the opportunity. In this case, ID, previously not seen as a problem in Russia, was recognized to be potentially serious, and the Russian Federation, assisted by the catalytic bi-national effort of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Economic and Technological Cooperation (Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission (GCC)) established a model salt iodization policy, developed a planning process, and implemented a program to prevent ID through a systematic approach that included the people, government, and private groups using open communication, dissemination of the findings, and action plans. By 1999, political will had been mobilized and over 20% of the nation's salt was being iodized, up from about 1% in 1996. Universal iodization of salt was not a specific objective of the GCC; however, the increasing availability of iodized salt is leading to the elimination of ID, which is now a political goal in Russia. The full realization of this goal will require more time for education, marketing, and possibly legislative action.
PubMed ID
12532684 View in PubMed
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Female reproductive function in areas affected by radiation after the Chernobyl power station accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59478
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Jul;101 Suppl 2:117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
V I Kulakov
T N Sokur
A I Volobuev
I S Tzibulskaya
V A Malisheva
B I Zikin
L C Ezova
L A Belyaeva
P D Bonartzev
N V Speranskaya
Author Affiliation
All-Union Scientific-Research Centre for Maternal and Child Health Care, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1993 Jul;101 Suppl 2:117-23
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Birth Rate - trends
Byelarus - epidemiology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Placenta - chemistry - pathology - radiation effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Toxemia - epidemiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper reports the results of a comprehensive survey of the effects of the accidental release of radiation caused by the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in April 1986. The accident and the resulting release of radiation and radioactive products into the atmosphere produced the most serious environmental contamination so far recorded. We have concentrated on evaluating the outcomes and health risks to women, their reproductive situation, and consequences for their progeny. We have concentrated on two well-defined areas: the Chechersky district of the Gomel region in Belorussia and the Polessky district of the Kiev region in the Ukraine. A number of investigations were carried out on 688 pregnant women and their babies, and data were obtained from 7000 labor histories of the development of newborns for a period of 8 years (3 years before the accident and 5 years after it). Parameters examined included birth rate, thyroid pathology, extragenital pathology such as anemias, renal disorders, hypertension, and abnormalities in the metabolism of fats, complications of gestation, spontaneous abortions, premature deliveries, perinatal morbidity and mortality, stillbirths and early neonatal mortality, infections and inflammatory diseases, neurological symptoms and hemic disturbances in both mothers and infants, trophic anomalies, and biochemical and structural changes in the placenta. Several exogenous, complicating influences were also considered such as psycho-emotional factors, stress, lifestyle changes, and others caused directly by the hazardous situation and by its consequences such as treatment, removal from affected areas, etc.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8243380 View in PubMed
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Infant leukemia in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21620
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1998 Apr;37(1):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
E P Ivanov
G V Tolochko
L P Shuvaeva
V E Ivanov
R F Iaroshevich
S. Becker
E. Nekolla
A M Kellerer
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Minsk, Republic of Belarus.
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1998 Apr;37(1):53-5
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Byelarus - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Germany - epidemiology
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia - epidemiology
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Ukraine
Abstract
Petridou et al. [1] have reported an increase in infant leukemia in Greek children born between 1/7/86 and 31/12/87 and have linked this increase to in utero radiation exposure due to the Chernobyl accident. Subsequently, Michaelis et al. [2] have reported a similar trend for Germany but found that it was not correlated to the levels of contamination. For Belarus, which was much more severely affected, a similar but much weaker trend is found.
PubMed ID
9615344 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.