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Birth defects in Norway by levels of external and food-based exposure to radiation from Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59591
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1992
Author
R T Lie
L M Irgens
R. Skjaerven
J B Reitan
P. Strand
T. Strand
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Date
Aug-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Down Syndrome - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Hydrocephalus - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
In Norway, external doses of radiation resulting from fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident were estimated from detailed measurements, including soil deposition patterns. Internal doses were estimated from measurements of radioactive cesium in meat and milk supplies. The doses were calculated as average monthly doses for each of 454 municipalities during 36 consecutive months after the accident in spring 1986. Prospectively collected data on all newborns listed in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway who were conceived in the period May 1983-April 1989 were used to assess possible dose-response relations between estimated external and food-based exposures and congenital malformations and some other conditions. A positive association was observed between total radiation dose (external plus food-based) and hydrocephaly, while a negative association was observed for Down's syndrome. However, an important conclusion of the study was that no associations were found for conditions previously reported to be associated with radiation, i.e., small head circumference, congenital cataracts, anencephaly, spina bifida, and low birth weight. Potential sources of bias, including exposure misclassification and incomplete ascertainment of cases, are discussed.
PubMed ID
1415157 View in PubMed
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Outcome of pregnancy in one Norwegian county 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62243
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):277-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M. Ulstein
T S Jensen
L M Irgens
R T Lie
E. Sivertsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):277-80
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Accidents
Birth rate
Female
Food Contamination, Radioactive - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
USSR
Abstract
Pregnancy outcome was studied in a county in Norway 3 years prior to and 3 years subsequent to the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident on 26th April 1986. More detailed analyses have been performed for the 12 months prior to and subsequent to the accident. A significant increase in the spontaneous abortion rate the first year after the accident was followed by a slight decrease during the second and third years, but figures were still higher than the period prior to the accident. The rate of legal abortions was unchanged. During the entire observation period the number of births increased continuously, with the exception of a decrease in the last 2 months of 1986 and the first month of 1987. A higher incidence of spontaneous abortions was found for pregnancies conceived during the first 3 months after the accident. This increase in the spontaneous abortion rate is noteworthy, and more especially its long-term persistence, which cannot be the result of external radiation. The internal radiation from food polluted by radioactive fallout is a possible explanation. Changes in nutrition in order to avoid polluted food may also be of importance.
PubMed ID
2244456 View in PubMed
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Pregnancy outcome in Norway after Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227241
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1991;45(6):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
L M Irgens
R T Lie
M. Ulstein
T. Skeie Jensen
R. Skjaerven
F. Sivertsen
J B Reitan
F. Strand
T. Strand
F. Egil Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen.
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1991;45(6):233-41
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Ukraine
Abstract
Pregnancy outcome has been studied in terms of legal abortions, early spontaneous abortions and total number of pregnancies (in an ad hoc study covering 6 counties) as well as various perinatal health problems (on the basis of routinely recorded data for epidemiological surveillance from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway). Apparently, no effects were observed in terms of an increased occurrence of legal abortions, while spontaneous abortions increased from 7.2% of all pregnancies during the last 12 months before the accident to 8.3% after the accident [corrected]. At the same time, the total number of pregnancies somewhat decreased. Based on monthly measurements in each municipality of external and internal (food-based) doses, dose-response associations were assessed for a number of perinatal health problems. No associations were observed.
Notes
Erratum In: Biomed Pharmacother 1991;45(9):428
PubMed ID
1912379 View in PubMed
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[Pregnancy outcome in some Norwegian counties before and after the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65228
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Jan 30;110(3):359-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1990
Author
M. Ulstein
T S Jensen
L M Irgens
R T Lie
E. Sivertsen
F E Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken, Haukeland sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Jan 30;110(3):359-62
Date
Jan-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Air Pollutants
Air Pollutants, Radioactive
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Norway
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The outcome of pregnancies in six countries in Norway has been studied during 12 months prior and subsequent to the Chernobyl accident. The accident took place in a period with an annual increase of births of approximately 3%. However, the year after the accident a decrease of 0.7% was observed with particularly low numbers during February--April 1987. Concomitantly, the miscarriage fraction of all pregnancies increased by 16.3% and particularly during November 1986--January 1987. The same pattern was found when observations from Haukeland Hospital were analyzed separately. When the time of conception was taken into consideration we found that conceptions during the period May--July 1986 ended more often as miscarriages. We have no explanation of the observations. The external radiation exposure seems too small to have produced these effects. The internal radiation from food may have played a role. People may also have changed their food intake, using less vegetables, due to fear of these being polluted by radioactive fallout.
PubMed ID
2309180 View in PubMed
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