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Cancer mortality following in utero exposure among offspring of female Mayak Worker Cohort members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122596
Source
Radiat Res. 2012 Sep;178(3):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
S J Schonfeld
Y V Tsareva
D L Preston
P V Okatenko
E S Gilbert
E. Ron
M E Sokolnikov
N A Koshurnikova
Author Affiliation
Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. schonfes@mail.nih.gov
Source
Radiat Res. 2012 Sep;178(3):160-5
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aging
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Risk
Russia
Abstract
Little is known about long-term cancer risks following in utero radiation exposure. We evaluated the association between in utero radiation exposure and risk of solid cancer and leukemia mortality among 8,000 offspring, born from 1948-1988, of female workers at the Mayak Nuclear Facility in Ozyorsk, Russia. Mother's cumulative gamma radiation uterine dose during pregnancy served as a surrogate for fetal dose. We used Poisson regression methods to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of solid cancer and leukemia mortality associated with in utero radiation exposure and to quantify excess relative risks (ERRs) as a function of dose. Using currently available dosimetry information, 3,226 (40%) offspring were exposed in utero (mean dose = 54.5 mGy). Based on 75 deaths from solid cancers (28 exposed) and 12 (6 exposed) deaths from leukemia, in utero exposure status was not significantly associated with solid cancer: RR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.49; ERR/Gy = -0.1 (95% CI
Notes
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PubMed ID
22799629 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of the cohort of workers at the Mayak nuclear complex.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200943
Source
Radiat Res. 1999 Oct;152(4):352-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
N A Koshurnikova
N S Shilnikova
P V Okatenko
V V Kreslov
M G Bolotnikova
M E Sokolnikov
V F Khokhriakov
K G Suslova
E K Vassilenko
S A Romanov
Author Affiliation
Branch No. 1 of the State Research Center "Biophysics Institute", Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, Russia.
Source
Radiat Res. 1999 Oct;152(4):352-63
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Information Services
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Exposure
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
At Branch No. 1 of the Russian State Research Center "Biophysics Institute", a registry has been created of workers at the "Mayak" Production Association, the first nuclear complex in Russia. This registry includes 18,830 persons hired at Mayak's nuclear reactors and radiochemical and plutonium production plant between 1948 and 1972. Twenty-five percent of these workers are women. As of December 31, 1994, the vital status is known for approximately 90% of the cohort members. A total of 5,118 persons have died. The cause for 97% of total deaths has been ascertained. The cohort members were exposed to both external gamma radiation and internal radiation from incorporated plutonium. The plutonium body burden has been measured in 30% of the cohort members with potential for plutonium exposure. External gamma-ray doses were in the range from tenths of milligrays to about 10 Gy, and plutonium body burdens were up to about 260 kBq. In view of the nature of the Mayak worker cohort, it has the potential to provide reasonably precise, quantitative estimates of the long-term health effects associated with chronic low-dose-rate exposure to external gamma radiation as well as internal radiation from plutonium. However, a number of issues must be addressed before credible risk estimates can be obtained from this cohort. These issues include the development of an appropriate internal comparison group and/or external rates and separating of the effects of internal and external exposures on risk estimates.
PubMed ID
10477912 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer mortality among male nuclear workers of the Mayak facilities in the former Soviet Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198202
Source
Radiat Res. 2000 Jul;154(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
M. Kreisheimer
N A Koshurnikova
E. Nekolla
V F Khokhryakov
S A Romanow
M E Sokolnikov
N S Shilnikova
P V Okatenko
A M Kellerer
Author Affiliation
Radiobiological Institute, University of Munich, Germany.
Source
Radiat Res. 2000 Jul;154(1):3-11
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alpha Particles - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Models, Statistical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - chemically induced - mortality
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Plutonium - toxicity
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
An analysis of lung cancer mortality in a cohort of 1,669 Mayak workers who started their employment in the plutonium and reprocessing plants between 1948 and 1958 has been carried out in terms of a relative risk model. Particular emphasis has been given to a discrimination of the effects of external gamma-ray exposure and internal alpha-particle exposure due to incorporated plutonium. This study has also used the information from a cohort of 2,172 Mayak reactor workers who were exposed only to external gamma rays. The baseline lung cancer mortality rate has not been taken from national statistics but has been derived from the cohort itself. For both alpha particles and gamma rays, the results of the analysis are consistent with linear dose dependences. The estimated excess relative risk per unit organ dose equivalent in the lung due to the plutonium alpha particles at age 60 equals, according to the present study, 0.6/Sv, with a radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha particles. The 95% confidence range is 0.39/Sv to 1.0/Sv. For the gamma-ray component, the present analysis suggests an excess relative risk for lung cancer mortality at age 60 of 0.20/Sv, with, however, a large 95% confidence range of-0.04/Sv to 0.69/Sv.
PubMed ID
10856959 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer mortality among nuclear workers of the Mayak facilities in the former Soviet Union. An updated analysis considering smoking as the main confounding factor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184564
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2003 Jul;42(2):129-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
M. Kreisheimer
M E Sokolnikov
N A Koshurnikova
V F Khokhryakov
S A Romanow
N S Shilnikova
P V Okatenko
E A Nekolla
A M Kellerer
Author Affiliation
Radiobiological Institute, University of Munich, Schillerstrasse 42, 80336 Munich, Germany. michael.kreisheimer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2003 Jul;42(2):129-35
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Models, Statistical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - mortality
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Plutonium - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Russia
Smoking
Abstract
A new analysis of lung cancer mortality in a cohort of male Mayak workers who started their employment in the plutonium and reprocessing plants between 1948 and 1958 has been carried out in terms of a relative risk model. The follow-up has been extended until 1999, moreover a new dosimetry system (DOSES2000) has been established. Particular emphasis has been given to a discrimination of the effects of external gamma-exposure and internal alpha-exposure due to incorporated plutonium. This study has also utilized and incorporated the information from a cohort of Mayak reactor workers, who were exposed only externally to gamma-rays. The influence of smoking as the main confounding factor for lung cancer has been studied. The baseline lung cancer mortality rate was not taken from national statistics but was derived from the cohort itself. The estimated excess relative risk for the plutonium alpha-rays was 0.23/Sv (95%CI: 0.16-0.31). The resulting risk coefficient for external gamma-ray exposure was very low with a statistically insignificant estimate of 0.058/Sv (95%CI: -0.072-0.20). The inferred relative risk for smokers was 16.5 (95%CI: 12.6-20.5).
PubMed ID
12851829 View in PubMed
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[The medical sequelae of the radiation accident in the Southern Urals in 1957]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37462
Source
Med Radiol (Mosk). 1990 Dec;35(12):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
L A Buldakov
S N Demin
M M Kosenko
V A Kostiuchenko
N A Koshurnikova
L Iu Krestinina
M M Saurov
I A Ternovskii
Z B Tokarskaia
Z B Shvedov
Source
Med Radiol (Mosk). 1990 Dec;35(12):11-5
Date
Dec-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects - analysis
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Mass Screening
Morbidity
Mortality
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
As a result of an accidental outburst of long-lived radionuclides at the nearest zone of the trace, a dose rate of gamma-radiation was several dozen CGy/h and in the open country at some populated areas it was 0.1 CGy/h. The evacuation of 10730 persons permitted a decrease of possible radiation doses 2-24-fold. A follow-up of persons who had been exposed to the highest effective equivalent doses of radiation before the evacuation revealed unstable indices of leukocytes and platelets (however they were within normal variations) in the first 2 years. Morbidity and mortality rates among the adults, the rates of congenital diseases and pediatric mortality did not differ from the control values. The rate of families having children born from persons aged 10 to 30 at the time of the accident did not differ from the similar rates for the USSR; this rate was lower by 5-10% than the control values for persons aged 0 to 9 at that time. Standardized birth rates in the study group (31 x 8,10(-3)) were much higher than in the control group (18 x 4,10(-3)).
PubMed ID
2266822 View in PubMed
Less detail