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Birth defects in Norway by levels of external and food-based exposure to radiation from Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59591
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1992
Author
R T Lie
L M Irgens
R. Skjaerven
J B Reitan
P. Strand
T. Strand
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug 15;136(4):377-88
Date
Aug-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Down Syndrome - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Hydrocephalus - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
In Norway, external doses of radiation resulting from fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident were estimated from detailed measurements, including soil deposition patterns. Internal doses were estimated from measurements of radioactive cesium in meat and milk supplies. The doses were calculated as average monthly doses for each of 454 municipalities during 36 consecutive months after the accident in spring 1986. Prospectively collected data on all newborns listed in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway who were conceived in the period May 1983-April 1989 were used to assess possible dose-response relations between estimated external and food-based exposures and congenital malformations and some other conditions. A positive association was observed between total radiation dose (external plus food-based) and hydrocephaly, while a negative association was observed for Down's syndrome. However, an important conclusion of the study was that no associations were found for conditions previously reported to be associated with radiation, i.e., small head circumference, congenital cataracts, anencephaly, spina bifida, and low birth weight. Potential sources of bias, including exposure misclassification and incomplete ascertainment of cases, are discussed.
PubMed ID
1415157 View in PubMed
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[Health protection after the Chernobyl accident. The relation of costs and reduction of radioactive dosage level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103264
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Jan 30;110(3):391-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1990
Author
P. Strand
J B Reitan
O. Harbitz
L. Brynildsen
Author Affiliation
Statens institutt for strålehygiene, Osterås.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Jan 30;110(3):391-3
Date
Jan-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Costs and Cost Analysis
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis - economics - prevention & control
Humans
Norway
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Protection - economics
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
This article describes the nutritional measures introduced to protect health after the Chernobyl accident, and the associated costs. The total value of the reindeer meat, mutton, lamb and goat meat saved as a result of such measures in 1987 amounted to approx. NOK 250 million. The measures cost approx. NOK 60 million. The resulting reduction in the radiation dose level to which the population was exposed was 450 manSv. In 1988, mutton/lamb and goat meat valued at approx. NOK 310 million was saved from condemnation by similar measures, which cost approx. NOK 50 million. The resulting dose level reduction was approx. 200 manSv. The relationship (cost/benefit ratio) between the overall cost of the measures taken to reduce radioactivity levels in food and the dose level reduction achieved was acceptable.
PubMed ID
2309188 View in PubMed
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Pregnancy outcome in Norway after Chernobyl.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227241
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1991;45(6):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
L M Irgens
R T Lie
M. Ulstein
T. Skeie Jensen
R. Skjaerven
F. Sivertsen
J B Reitan
F. Strand
T. Strand
F. Egil Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, University of Bergen.
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 1991;45(6):233-41
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Ukraine
Abstract
Pregnancy outcome has been studied in terms of legal abortions, early spontaneous abortions and total number of pregnancies (in an ad hoc study covering 6 counties) as well as various perinatal health problems (on the basis of routinely recorded data for epidemiological surveillance from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway). Apparently, no effects were observed in terms of an increased occurrence of legal abortions, while spontaneous abortions increased from 7.2% of all pregnancies during the last 12 months before the accident to 8.3% after the accident [corrected]. At the same time, the total number of pregnancies somewhat decreased. Based on monthly measurements in each municipality of external and internal (food-based) doses, dose-response associations were assessed for a number of perinatal health problems. No associations were observed.
Notes
Erratum In: Biomed Pharmacother 1991;45(9):428
PubMed ID
1912379 View in PubMed
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[Radiation accidents and radiation disasters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221033
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 May 20;113(13):1583-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1993
Author
J B Reitan
Author Affiliation
Statens strålevern, Osterås.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 May 20;113(13):1583-8
Date
May-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Disaster planning
Disasters
Humans
Norway
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Radiation, Ionizing
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Abstract
Accidents and disasters involving ionizing radiation are rare. Such accidents may occur not only at nuclear power stations but also in medicine and in industry. Only fairly large radiation doses can give acute medical effects. Symptoms and signs depend on the actual dose, and on what parts of the body are irradiated. In connection with a radiation accident, the main points are to recognize in the first place that radiation may be involved, and to have some knowledge of the actual source. Risk of localized irradiation from industrial sources, especially of hands, is a problem that is often overlooked. The paper reviews the principles for action by local health officers, the pathogenesis of radiation injury and early medical management. Some information is also given on the Norwegian system of contingency preparedness against nuclear accidents.
PubMed ID
8337648 View in PubMed
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