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Cytogenetic effects in lymphocytes from children exposed to radiation fall-out after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34042
Source
Mutat Res. 1997 Dec 12;395(2-3):249-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1997
Author
L. Padovani
L. Stronati
F. Mauro
A. Testa
M. Appolloni
P. Anzidei
D. Caporossi
B. Tedeschi
P. Vernole
Author Affiliation
Environment Department, CR ENEA Casaçcia, Rome, Italy.
Source
Mutat Res. 1997 Dec 12;395(2-3):249-54
Date
Dec-12-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Byelarus
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Ukraine
Abstract
In a previous paper we reported that a group of children exposed to ionizing radiation following the Chernobyl accident exhibited an appreciable number of chromosome breaks and rearrangements reflecting the persistence of a radiation-induced damage. The results suggested that the children were still exposed to radioactive contamination through consumer foodstuff and life styles. In the present paper, 31 exposed children have been considered together with a control group of 11 children with the aim to confirm previous results. All children underwent whole-body counter (WBC) measures and conventional cytogenetic analysis. The frequency of chromosome aberrations detected by conventional cytogenetics in the group of children chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation resulted in significant differences with respect to the control group. The present work suggests that, for these groups of children, even if the frequency of aberrations is very low and the observation of statistically significant differences is consequently a problem, a persistently abnormal cytogenetic picture is still present several years after the accident.
PubMed ID
9465937 View in PubMed
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Cytogenetic study in lymphocytes from children exposed to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36157
Source
Mutat Res. 1993 Sep;319(1):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
L. Padovani
D. Caporossi
B. Tedeschi
P. Vernole
B. Nicoletti
F. Mauro
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Health Effects, ENEA Casaccia, Rome, Italy.
Source
Mutat Res. 1993 Sep;319(1):55-60
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Explosions
Female
Humans
Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Russia
Time Factors
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The present study concerns the monitoring of children from the Byelorussian, Ukrainian and Russian republics exposed to the fall-out of the Chernobyl accident. Cytogenetic analyses have been performed on 41 children coming from different areas and exhibiting varying amounts of 137Cs internal contamination, as evaluated by whole-body counter (WBC) analysis. On a total of 28,670 metaphases scored, radiation-induced chromosome damage is still present, although at a very low frequency. Due to the very low fraction of dicentrics, because of the time elapsed from the accident and the relatively low doses of exposure, radiobiological dosimetry is not possible for these children. However, considering that the WBC data indicate that the children are still exposed to 137Cs contamination, the observed occurrence of stable chromosome rearrangements and breaks may represent the persisting effect of continuous low doses of radiation. The present study also indicates that the parallel use of internal contamination dosimetry and cytogenetics could be usefully employed to monitor individual exposure to radiation and to define further management measures.
PubMed ID
7690459 View in PubMed
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Cytogenetic study on children living in Southern Urals contaminated areas (nuclear incidents 1948-1967).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205306
Source
Mutat Res. 1998 Jun 5;401(1-2):193-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1998
Author
A. Testa
L. Padovani
F. Mauro
M. Appolloni
P. Anzidei
L. Stronati
Author Affiliation
Environmental Department, ENEA Casaccia, Rome, Italy.
Source
Mutat Res. 1998 Jun 5;401(1-2):193-7
Date
Jun-5-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Cells - radiation effects
Cesium radioisotopes
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
Cohort Studies
Environmental pollution
Female
Humans
Male
Metaphase
Nuclear Reactors
Radioactive Hazard Release
Russia
Strontium
USSR
Abstract
As a result of the activities of the first Soviet plutonium production reactor, large territories of the Southern Urals were exposed to radioactive contamination. Three different incidents occurring between 1948 and 1967 lead to major exposure. A total of 280,000 people residing on the contaminated territories were exposed both to external and internal contamination particularly due to the long-lived radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr. The highest doses were received by 28,000 people living on the Techa riverside villages. In the present paper 15 presumably exposed children coming from the Muslyumovo village on the Techa river have been analyzed using conventional cytogenetic procedure in order to assess a radiation-induced damage. The data obtained have been compared to a group of matched unexposed controls. The results show a statistical difference between the two cohorts which suggests a possible residual contamination representing a continuous hazard for the new generations.
PubMed ID
9639704 View in PubMed
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Do human lymphocytes exposed to the fallout of the Chernobyl accident exhibit an adaptive response? III. Challenge with bleomycin in lymphocytes from children hit by the initial acute dose of ionizing radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34715
Source
Mutat Res. 1996 Jul 5;354(1):77-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-5-1996
Author
B. Tedeschi
D. Caporossi
P. Vernole
L. Padovani
F. Mauro
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Cell Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy.
Source
Mutat Res. 1996 Jul 5;354(1):77-80
Date
Jul-5-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - toxicity
Bleomycin - toxicity
Child
Chromosome Aberrations
Female
Humans
Lymphocytes - drug effects - radiation effects
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
In the present paper, we report data on the possible adaptive response, induced in vivo by exposure to ionizing radiation to a challenge treatment with the radiomimetic glycopeptide bleomycin (BLM). Lymphocytes from children living in Pripjat at the time of the Chernobyl accident, and thus hit by the initial acute dose of ionizing radiation, were treated for the last 5 h of culture with 0.004 U/ml BLM. Significantly lower chromosome damage was found only in lymphocytes from children who, independently of the initial acute exposure to ionizing radiation, still showed a 137Cs internal contamination, due to persistent continuous exposure to low doses of radiation. The present results indicate that past exposure to acute high dose of ionizing radiation does not interfere with resistance to BLM which is related to internal contamination.
PubMed ID
8692209 View in PubMed
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