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7 records – page 1 of 1.

15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35663
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
M. Hoshi
Y. Shibata
S. Okajima
T. Takatsuji
S. Yamashita
H. Namba
N. Yokoyama
M. Izumi
S. Nagataki
K. Fujimura
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University, Japan.
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The level of radiation exposure in children in Belarus caused by the Chernobyl accident was investigated on the basis of whole body 137Cs count. The subjects were 10,062 children (4,762 boys and 5,300 girls) in Mogilev and Gomel, Belarus, who received Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project health examinations from May 1991 to December 1992 and who were 5-16 y old at the time of examination. The median whole body 137Cs count per body weight varied from 21-48 Bq kg-1 and from 28-126 Bq kg-1 in Mogilev oblast and Gomel oblast, respectively. (The "oblast" is the largest administrative district constituting the country. Belarus consists of 6 oblasts). Corresponding annual effective dose equivalents were all less than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y-1, but the observed levels in the children were considerably higher than the average level of 2.3 Bq kg-1 reported in the past for the former Soviet Union.
Notes
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-57730075
PubMed ID
8056594 View in PubMed
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[Health-related evaluation of thyroid irradiation doses in inhabitants of the Ukrainian S.S.R. after the Chernobyl AES accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24949
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):44-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A E Romanenko
I A Likhtarev
N K Shandala
G M Gul'ko
I A Kairo
N I Chepurnoi
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):44-7
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Microcomputers
Models, Theoretical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Software
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology
Ukraine
Abstract
The paper considers the radiation doses of the thyroid gland in the inhabitants from the Ukrainian SSR areas (Kiev, Zhitomir, Chernigov, and Vinnitsa Regions), which have been obtained by instrumental studies of thyroidal radioactivity in May-June, 1986, and calculated by the most conservative single-dose administration model. A hygienic evaluation has been made of the findings, taking into account the age and residence. The cumulative irradiation doses of the thyroid have been estimated for children and adults. Possible late sequelae for the areas in question may account for 1060 and 300 thyroid carcinoma cases during the whole life for children and adults, respectively.
PubMed ID
1950160 View in PubMed
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Histopathological characteristics of childhood thyroid cancer in Gomel, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22804
Source
Int J Cancer. 1996 Jan 3;65(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-3-1996
Author
M. Ito
S. Yamashita
K. Ashizawa
T. Hara
H. Namba
M. Hoshi
Y. Shibata
I. Sekine
L. Kotova
G. Panasyuk
E P Demidchick
S. Nagataki
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1996 Jan 3;65(1):29-33
Date
Jan-3-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - pathology
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology
Ukraine
Abstract
We reviewed histopathologically 19 cases of childhood thyroid cancer occurring between 1991 and 1994 among 14,396 screening subjects in Gomel, Republic of Belarus, the region most severely radio-contaminated by the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. The patients were 13 girls and 6 boys with a mean age of 10.6 years. The mean age at the time of the accident was 3.2 years. Mean tumor diameter was 16 mm, and all cases were papillary carcinoma with various amounts of solid component. Psammoma bodies and stromal fibrosis were encountered to some extent in almost all cases. The tumors were highly prone to local invasion and regional lymph-node metastasis. No morphological evidence for radiation-induced cancer was obtained in these cases. 137Cs levels were relatively high in the patients' bodies and in the soil at the places of domicile. However, there was no dose-response relationship between cancer prevalence and radioactivity. These facts suggest that the incidence of aggressive pediatric thyroid cancer is extremely high in Gomel, where most of the children were exposed to a low level of radioactivity over a long time after the accident. At present, however, no definite conclusion can be drawn on the relationship between cancer occurrence and radioactive contamination.
PubMed ID
8543392 View in PubMed
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[Radiologic consequences and medico-biological problems 4 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36859
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1992;(2):7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A E Romanenko
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1992;(2):7-14
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Child
English Abstract
Humans
Nuclear Reactors
Radioactive Pollutants
Ukraine
Vital statistics
Abstract
The data on the assessment of the radiobiological situation and the results of clinical and epidemiological studies into the population health status, exposed to radiation because of the Chernobyl NPP accident are summarized. Appropriate regularities in soil contamination with 137Cs are ascertained. It has been shown that the disease incidence among the children's and adult population of the controlled areas is associated not only with improvement of the disease revealing but with the influence of the accident consequences.
PubMed ID
1626414 View in PubMed
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[Results of the implementation of the program C.27 and priority trends of further research in the elimination of medical sequelae of the Chernobyl AES accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24989
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(11):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

[Thyroid diseases after Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36310
Source
Rinsho Byori. 1993 Apr;41(4):345-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
S. Nagataki
Author Affiliation
1st Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine.
Source
Rinsho Byori. 1993 Apr;41(4):345-52
Date
Apr-1993
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Child
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Thyroid Diseases - etiology
Ukraine
Abstract
Radioactive iodine is released at every atomic-bomb testings and nuclear plants accidents and radioactive iodine is taken up by thyroid glands (internal radiation). In addition to the internal radiation, radioactive fallout causes the external radiation and thyroid glands are known to be sensitive to the external radiation. Furthermore, patients with radiation-induced thyroid disease can survive for a long time regardless of the treatment. The survey of thyroid diseases, therefore, is very sensitive and reliable ways to investigate the effects of radiation caused by atomic bomb explosion, testing and various types of nuclear plants' accidents. Our group from Nagasaki University was asked investigate the thyroid diseases and joined to the Sasakawa Project. In order to investigate the effects of radiation on thyroid disease, it is essential 1) to make a correct diagnosis in each subject, 2) to calculate a correct radiation dose in each subject and finally, 3) to find out the correlation between the radiation dose and thyroid diseases including age-, sex- and area-matched controls. We have established 5 centers (1 in Russia, 2 in Belarus, 2 in Ukraine) and supplied the most valuable ultrasonography instruments, commercial kits for the determination of serum free T4 and TSH level and for the autoantibodies, instrument for urinary iodine measurements, syringes, tubes, refrigerators, etc. We visit each center often and asked peoples at centers to come to Japan for training. Protocol of investigation is essentially the same as that in Nagasaki, and we are planning to investigate more than 50,000 children within 5 years. We are hoping to show a definite conclusion in the near future.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8350496 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.