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13 records – page 1 of 2.

[Assessment of radiation risk of leukemia induction based on the analysis of the consequences of population irradiation in Southern Ural].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227404
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M M Kosenko
M O Degteva
N A Petrushova
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):23-8
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Radioactive
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Risk factors
Russia
Time Factors
Abstract
The authors provide the results of long-term investigations of the consequences of environmental pollution from the military nuclear plant in the Southern Urals. Altogether 28,100 individuals who received substantial doses of external and internal radiation in the Techa riverside in the early fifties were entered into the study. The increase in the leukemia incidence as compared with unexposed controls has been confirmed on a statistical basis. The majority of excess cases of leukemia were recorded within the 5th to the 20th year after irradiation and may be attributed to the acute and chronic granulocytic types. The level of leukemia risk on the basis of the Techa river data is evaluated as 0.48-1.10 per 10(4) persons/years/Gy.
PubMed ID
1835230 View in PubMed
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Cortical bone resorption rate in elderly persons: estimates from long-term in vivo measurements of (90)Sr in the skeleton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131840
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 May-Jun;54(3):e411-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
N B Shagina
E I Tolstykh
M O Degteva
L R Anspaugh
B A Napier
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, 454076 Chelyabinsk, Russian Federation. nata@urcrm.ru
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 May-Jun;54(3):e411-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Burden
Bone Resorption - diagnosis - metabolism
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radioactive Waste - adverse effects
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
The rate of cortical bone resorption was assessed from long-term in vivo measurements of (90)Sr content in the skeleton for men aged 50-80 years and for women 0-30 years after menopause. Measurements of (90)Sr were conducted with a whole body counter (WBC) for residents of the Techa Riverside communities (Southern Urals, Russia), who ingested large amounts of (90)Sr as a result of releases of liquid radioactive wastes into the river from the Mayak plutonium facility in early 1950s. The results of this study showed an increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption in both men and women, as based on the use of accidentally ingested (90)Sr as a tracer for bone metabolism. In men there was a continuous gradual increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption after 55 years from 2.8 to 4.5%/year by the age of 75 years. In women, there was a doubled increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption after menopause of up to 6%/year; then the rate remained unchanged for 10-12 years with a subsequent gradual decline down to 5-5.5%/year. Comparison of the rate of cortical bone resorption in men and women older than 55 years showed that women expressed significantly higher levels of cortical bone resorption.
PubMed ID
21871673 View in PubMed
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Development of an improved dose reconstruction system for the Techa River population affected by the operation of the Mayak Production Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168551
Source
Radiat Res. 2006 Jul;166(1 Pt 2):255-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
M O Degteva
M I Vorobiova
E I Tolstykh
N B Shagina
E A Shishkina
L R Anspaugh
B A Napier
N G Bougrov
V A Shved
E E Tokareva
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, 454076 Chelyabinsk, Russian Federation.
Source
Radiat Res. 2006 Jul;166(1 Pt 2):255-70
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Burden
Humans
Nuclear Reactors - statistics & numerical data
Organ Specificity
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Radioisotopes - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Risk Assessment - methods - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Whole-Body Counting - methods
Abstract
The Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS) has been developed to provide estimates of dose received by approximately 30,000 members of the Extended Techa River Cohort (ETRC). Members of the ETRC were exposed beginning in 1949 to significant levels of external and internal (mainly from (90)Sr) dose but at low to moderate dose rates. Members of this cohort are being studied in an effort to test the hypothesis that exposure at low to moderate dose rates has the same ability to produce stochastic health effects as exposure at high dose rates. The current version of the TRDS is known as TRDS-2000 and is the subject of this paper. The estimated doses from (90)Sr are supported strongly by approximately 30,000 measurements made with a tooth beta-particle counter, measurements of bones collected at autopsy, and approximately 38,000 measurements made with a special whole-body counter that detects the bremsstrahlung from (90)Y. The median doses to the red bone marrow and the bone surface are 0.21 and 0.37 Gy, respectively. The maximum doses to the red bone marrow and bone surface are 2.0 and 5.2 Gy, respectively. Distributions of dose to other organs are provided and are lower than the values given above. Directions for future work are discussed.
PubMed ID
16808612 View in PubMed
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Dose reconstruction system for the exposed population living along the Techa River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198849
Source
Health Phys. 2000 May;78(5):542-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M O Degteva
M I Vorobiova
V P Kozheurov
E I Tolstykh
L R Anspaugh
B A Napier
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk, Russia.
Source
Health Phys. 2000 May;78(5):542-54
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Physics - methods
Humans
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive waste
Russia
Abstract
The Mayak Production Association, which began operation in 1948, was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium. Significant worker and population exposure occurred as a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Members of the public were exposed via discharge of about 1017 Bq of liquid wastes into the Techa River during 1949-1956, an explosion in the radioactive waste-storage facility in 1957, and gaseous aerosol releases within the first decades of the facility's operation. Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to sediments and shoreline. The specific aim of this project is to enhance the reconstruction of external and internal radiation doses for individuals in the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the methods that are being used in this enhanced dose-reconstruction effort and to provide example and representative results of the calculations. The methods of dose assessment currently being developed for the exposed population [termed the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000)], which are a significant improvement on past methods (TRDS-1996), are presented. The new TRDS-2000 doses from the ingestion of radionuclides are substantially higher for the gastrointestinal tract, due to consideration of short-lived radionuclides. The TRDS-2000 doses from external exposure are substantially lower due to improvements in several factors. Assessment of uncertainty and validation of the "new" doses are significant issues currently under investigation.
PubMed ID
10772028 View in PubMed
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Emerging technological bases for retrospective dosimetry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22298
Source
Stem Cells. 1997;15 Suppl 2:183-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T. Straume
L R Anspaugh
E H Haskell
J N Lucas
A A Marchetti
I A Likhtarev
V V Chumak
A A Romanyukha
V T Khrouch
Gavrilin YuI
V F Minenko
Author Affiliation
Health and Ecological Assessment Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, USA.
Source
Stem Cells. 1997;15 Suppl 2:183-93
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Animals
Child
Fast Neutrons
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Iodine Radioisotopes
Japan
Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Macaca mulatta
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Nuclear Warfare
Occupational Exposure
Power Plants
Radiometry
Retrospective Studies
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Translocation, Genetic
Ukraine
Abstract
In this article we discuss examples of challenging problems in retrospective dosimetry and describe some promising solutions. The ability to make measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry and luminescence techniques promises to provide improved dosimetry for regions of Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation contaminated by radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident. In addition, it may soon be possible to resolve the large neutron discrepancy in the dosimetry system for Hiroshima through novel measurement techniques that can be used to reconstruct the fast-neutron fluence emitted by the bomb some 51 years ago. Important advances in molecular cytogenetics and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements have produced biodosimeters that show potential in retrospective dosimetry. The most promising of these are the frequency of reciprocal translocations measured in chromosomes of blood lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the electron paramagnetic resonance signal in tooth enamel.
PubMed ID
9368303 View in PubMed
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The feasibility of using 129I to reconstruct 131I deposition from the Chernobyl reactor accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22431
Source
Health Phys. 1996 Nov;71(5):733-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
T. Straume
A A Marchetti
L R Anspaugh
V T Khrouch
Gavrilin YuI
S M Shinkarev
V V Drozdovitch
A V Ulanovsky
S V Korneev
M K Brekeshev
E S Leonov
G. Voigt
S V Panchenko
V F Minenko
Author Affiliation
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore 94550, USA.
Source
Health Phys. 1996 Nov;71(5):733-40
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis
Nuclear Reactors
Plutonium - analysis
Power Plants
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Ukraine
Abstract
Radioiodine released to the atmosphere from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the spring of 1986 resulted in large-scale thyroid-gland exposure of populations in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. Because of the short half life of 131I (8.04 d), adequate data on the intensities and patterns of iodine deposition were not collected, especially in the regions where the incidence of childhood-thyroid cancer is now increasing. Results are presented from a feasibility study that show that accelerator-mass-spectrometry measurements of 129I (half life 16 x 106 y) in soil can be used to reconstruct 131I-deposition density and thus help in the thyroid-dosimetry effort that is now urgently needed to support epidemiologic studies of childhood-thyroid cancer in the affected regions.
PubMed ID
8887520 View in PubMed
Less detail

The global impact of the Chernobyl reactor accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25722
Source
Science. 1988 Dec 16;242(4885):1513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1988
Author
L R Anspaugh
R J Catlin
M. Goldman
Author Affiliation
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550.
Source
Science. 1988 Dec 16;242(4885):1513-9
Date
Dec-16-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Effects
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Radioactive material was deposited throughout the Northern Hemisphere as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station on 26 April 1986. On the basis of a large amount of environmental data and new integrated dose assessment and risk models, the collective dose commitment to the approximately 3 billion inhabitants is calculated to be 930,000 person-gray, with 97% in the western Soviet Union and Europe. The best estimates for the lifetime expectation of fatal radiogenic cancer would increase the risk from 0 to 0.02% in Europe and 0 to 0.003% in the Northern Hemisphere. By means of an integration of the environmental data, it is estimated that approximately 100 petabecquerels of cesium-137 (1 PBq = 10(15) Bq) were released during and subsequent to the accident.
PubMed ID
3201240 View in PubMed
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Health effects of radiation incidents in the southern Urals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215308
Source
Stem Cells. 1995 May;13 Suppl 1:58-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
A V Akleyev
M M Kossenko
L A Silkina
M O Degteva
V A Yachmenyov
A. Awa
M. Akiyama
G A Veremeyeva
A V Vozilova
S. Kyozumi
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk, Russia.
Source
Stem Cells. 1995 May;13 Suppl 1:58-68
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bone Marrow - radiation effects
Female
Humans
Male
Mutation
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology - mortality
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - etiology - mortality
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Radioactive Hazard Release
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
This article discusses the most important information on health effects in the Urals region (Russia) of residents exposed to radiation from activities of a weapon plutonium separation plant. The population residing on the contaminated territory was exposed to chronic combined irradiation (external gamma-irradiation and internal irradiation due to Sr-90 and Cs-137). The red bone marrow (RBM) was the critical organ affected as a result of radiation events in the Urals. In the early period, after the discharges of radioactive wastes into the river Techa (about 3 M Ci) started, cases of chronic radiation sickness (CRS; 940 cases, in total), postirradiation reactions manifested by changes in blood parameters (e.g., leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, granulocytopenia), nervous system disorders, immunity changes and ostealgic syndrome were registered in a portion of those riverside village residents who had received the highest doses. Increased leukemia and cancer mortality and morbidity rates were noted among this population in later periods. No late effects were observed in residents exposed to an explosion in a radioactive waste depot in September, 1957 when radioactive wastes with about 20 M Ci of activity were released into the environment. Similarly, the offspring of the residents exposed on the Techa also did not display any late effects. The data about the possibilities of long-term (43-45 years after the start of exposure) biological indication of chronic internal exposure are presented. The methods used in the study include in situ fluorescent hybridization, analysis of mutations in the TCR gene of peripheral blood lymphocytes and erythrocyte mutations in the glycophorine A system. No dependence of genomic translocations and mutations in glycophorine A on cumulative exposure dose to RBM was traced.
PubMed ID
7488969 View in PubMed
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[Health-related evaluation of thyroid irradiation doses in inhabitants of the Ukrainian S.S.R. after the Chernobyl AES accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24949
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):44-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A E Romanenko
I A Likhtarev
N K Shandala
G M Gul'ko
I A Kairo
N I Chepurnoi
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1991;(8):44-7
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Microcomputers
Models, Theoretical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Software
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology
Ukraine
Abstract
The paper considers the radiation doses of the thyroid gland in the inhabitants from the Ukrainian SSR areas (Kiev, Zhitomir, Chernigov, and Vinnitsa Regions), which have been obtained by instrumental studies of thyroidal radioactivity in May-June, 1986, and calculated by the most conservative single-dose administration model. A hygienic evaluation has been made of the findings, taking into account the age and residence. The cumulative irradiation doses of the thyroid have been estimated for children and adults. Possible late sequelae for the areas in question may account for 1060 and 300 thyroid carcinoma cases during the whole life for children and adults, respectively.
PubMed ID
1950160 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.