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Abusive relationships in families of women with borderline personality disorder, anorexia nervosa and a control group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193394
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Laporte
H. Guttman
Author Affiliation
Allan Memorial Institute, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nuclear Family - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
In a group of intact families, we examined the rates and parameters of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse in 35 women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), 34 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), and 33 women without a clinical history (NC); their experience of multiple abuse and its correlation with their SCL-90-R scores; and their reports of abuse of their siblings. Corroboration of abuse was obtained from some parents in each group. Women with BPD suffered more intrafamilial verbal and physical abuse. Whereas AN and NC women experienced relatively rare single events of extrafamilial sexual abuse at an older age, those with BPD suffered repeated intrafamilial sexual abuse at a younger age and also suffered more multiple abuse. All multiply abused women had more psychopathology. Siblings were reported abused in the same proportions as subjects; many parents of BPDs corroborated their daughters' reports of all three forms of abuse.
PubMed ID
11531204 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and resiliency in Swedish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84584
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Sep;21(3):329-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Kiehl Ermalynn M
Carson David K
Dykes Anna-Karin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. e.kiehl@louisville.edu
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Sep;21(3):329-37
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Family Health
Family Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Nuclear Family - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
A longitudinal research project began in 1993 of Norwegian, Swedish and American mothers' perception of her family's dynamics and adaptation during childbearing and childrearing. Results indicated that Swedish mothers adapted better than other mothers. In 2003, a mixed design study was conducted with original Swedish mothers that aimed to describe the experience of motherhood, the meaning mothers attached to events in their lives that made adaptation necessary, and ways in which they achieved adaptation. Fourteen mothers completed quantitative instruments and 13 of those mothers were interviewed. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analysed for themes using a protocol based on a model of family resiliency. Quantitative findings revealed statistically significant findings in areas of children, mother's work outside the home and families in which a major illness had occurred. Qualitative findings revealed that protective factors far outweighed vulnerability and risk factors. Mothers' satisfaction with life manifested itself in love of home, contentment with employment, fulfillment from an active and healthy life and support from a society that provides a wide range of social benefits for the family. Vulnerability occurred primarily when mothers were tired, lacked personal time or someone in the family was experiencing a serious illness. Results of this study enhance the scholarly scientific knowledge about the uniqueness of Swedish mothers, and increased understanding of family dynamics and adaptation. Many of the findings relate in some way to overall social benefits and supports available for families.
PubMed ID
17727545 View in PubMed
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Alcohol problems in Alaska Natives: lessons from the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83359
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(1):1-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
  1 document  
Author
Seale J Paul
Shellenberger Sylvia
Spence John
Author Affiliation
Family Health Center, Macon, GA 31206, USA. seale.paul@mccg.org
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(1):1-31
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
378308
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Attitude to Health
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Motivation
Nuclear Family - psychology
Risk factors
Abstract
In this Alaska Native study, cultural "insiders" analyzed problems associated with increased alcohol availability, factors which have reduced alcohol-related problems, and ideas for improving treatment in an Inuit community. Participants described frequent binging, blackouts, family violence, suicide, loss of child custody, and feelings of intergenerational grief. Helpful existing treatment approaches include alcohol ordinances, inpatient treatment programs, twelve-step groups, and religious involvement. Participants urged the development of family treatment approaches which integrate Inuit customs and values.
PubMed ID
17602395 View in PubMed
Documents

131_Seale_Alcohol_Problems_1-31.pdf

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[Are children subject to family reunification in Denmark a risk group requiring special attention?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31774
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 31;164(1):46-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-2001
Author
M. Deurell
B. Hansen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 31;164(1):46-9
Date
Dec-31-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adoption
Adult
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Nuclear Family - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim was to evaluate the actual health conditions of children subject to family reunification at the time of their introductory examination at their Danish school and to estimate whether these children represent any health risk to others at the school. The focus was the children's somatic disease pattern and not the behavioural and psychopathological aspects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective analysis was carried out of children subject to family reunification who started school in Copenhagen in the school year, 1999/2000. This analysis is based on a family interview with the aid of a translator and an objective medical examination. RESULTS: In the school year 1999/2000, 148 children were examined. They were aged between 5 and 18 years. The children had emigrated from 25 different countries. Fifty-five children live with only one biological parent. Eighteen point five per cent of the children have earlier had one or more diseases. Most of them (91.2%) were assessed as having good general health and sensomotoric development according to their age. Among the 148 children examined, 48% have had one or more diagnoses made. DISCUSSION: On the basis of the experience obtained in this study, more resources must be allocated for better examination. CONCLUSION: In the light of the pattern of disease, it cannot be concluded that the children constitute a risk of infection for other children and adults at school. The results of this study call attention to a need for prospective studies on the health conditions of the children subject to family reunification on their arrival in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11810797 View in PubMed
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Around-the-clock: parent work schedules and children's well-being in a 24-h economy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179247
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Oct;59(7):1517-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Lyndall Strazdins
Rosemary J Korda
Lynette L-Y Lim
Dorothy H Broom
Rennie M D'Souza
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. lyndall.strazdins@anu.edu.au
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Oct;59(7):1517-27
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Employment
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Multivariate Analysis
Nuclear Family - psychology
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Family life in developed economies has undergone a fundamental change--shifting from single-breadwinner households (typical of the post war decades) to families where both parents are employed. Equally dramatic has been the emergence of around-the-clock economies, altering the way work is organised, especially working time. Many more children now live in households where one or both parents work non-standard hours (evenings, nights or on weekends). Are there any implications for children's well-being when parents work non-standard schedules? There has been virtually no investigation of how children are faring in these around-the-clock households, despite evidence that non-standard work times affect family functioning and are stressful for parents. Using data from a representative sample of 4433 dual-earner Canadian families and their 2--11-year-old children (N children=6361), we compared families where both parents worked standard hours, with families where one or both worked non-standard times (evenings, nights or weekends). In nearly three-quarters of the families one or both parents regularly worked non-standard times. We found associations between children's well-being and parent work schedules, with higher odds ratios for child difficulties when parents worked non-standard times. These associations persisted after adjusting for several confounding factors including socio-economic status, parent part-time or full-time work, and childcare use, and were evident whether mothers, fathers or both parents worked non-standard times. The findings raise questions about the implications for children of the 24-h economy.
PubMed ID
15246179 View in PubMed
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Children with functional motor limitations: the effects on family strengths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176040
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2005;35(3):281-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Silja Pirila
Jaap Van Der Meere
Ritva-Liissa Seppänen
Liisa Ojala
Anne Jaakkola
Raija Korpela
Pirkko Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Research Centre, Tampere University Hospital, Finland and Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, Finland. silja.pirila@phsp.fi
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2005;35(3):281-95
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Relations
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Motor Skills Disorders
Nuclear Family - psychology
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Sixty children with functional motor limitations (age range from 15 months to 7 years 3 months) and their parents participated in the study. The objective was to explore the relationship of the severity of their restrictions on family strengths. Functional motor abilities of the children were assessed using Autti-Ramo's Scale. Cognitive functions were assessed using the Swedish standardized version of the Griffiths Scales of Mental Development. Family strengths were indexed using the Family Functioning Style Scale. The social-economical status, children's age and caretakers' age were taken into account. Overall, the results indicated that family strengths were rather strong. Only families rearing a child with severe participation limitations (functional motor limitations and cognitive difficulties) showed less strengths concerning family identity and internal coping relative to families with a child with milder participation limitations.
PubMed ID
15731891 View in PubMed
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A Christmas without memories: Beliefs about grief and mothering--a clinical case analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166584
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2006 Nov;12(4):426-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Nancy J Moules
Lorraine M Thirsk
Janice M Bell
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary.
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2006 Nov;12(4):426-41
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alberta
Attitude to Death
Communication
Family Nursing - organization & administration
Female
Grief
Holidays
Humans
Models, Psychological
Mother-Child Relations
Nuclear Family - psychology
Nurse Clinicians - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Patient Education as Topic
Psychotherapy
Abstract
In clinical work using the Illness Beliefs Model, therapeutic leverage is focused on challenging constraining beliefs of family members that are contributing to their suffering. This challenge occurs in many ways, including offering alternative facilitating beliefs that may lead to healing rather than suffering. This article describes an exemplar of clinical work with a family who sought services in the Family Nursing Unit at the University of Calgary, with the presenting concern of unresolved grief. This analysis describes the therapeutic conversation that occurred between the family and a team of nurse clinicians, where the young woman's beliefs about grief and mothering were distinguished as beliefs that were contributing to her emotional pain and her belief in her mothering capabilities. The nursing team offered alternative beliefs of which the family rapidly embraced and, subsequently, experienced diminishment of the suffering previously experienced.
PubMed ID
17099119 View in PubMed
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[Chronic heart or lung disease and psychosocial stress]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33443
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jan 20;119(2):209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1999
Author
I. Spurkland
T. Bjørbaek
O. Geiran
Author Affiliation
Statens senter for barne- og ungdomspsykiatri, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jan 20;119(2):209-13
Date
Jan-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiomyopathies - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Child
Cystic Fibrosis - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
English Abstract
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Heart Transplantation - psychology
Heart-Lung Transplantation - psychology
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Male
Nuclear Family - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Ten boys and 15 girls below the age of 16, were referred to the National Hospital in Norway for evaluation for heart or lung transplantation 1990-97. 24 of the children and their families went through a thorough psychosocial assessment in order to assess the supportive measures the children and their families might need for coping with stress during the evaluation and the follow-up period. The patients were divided into three diagnostic groups: Two had cystic fibrosis and one an obstructive lung disease, heart-lung group, eight had congenital heart disease and 13 cardiomyopathy. 15 children were accepted for transplantation and placed on the waiting list. The others were rejected for medical reasons. Seven children (29%) filled the criteria for a psychiatric diagnosis (six anxiety disorders and one depression). Five others had considerable anxiety symptoms. The cardiomyopathy group had fewer problems than the heart-lung and congenital heart disease groups. The study shows that families with children suffering from life-threatening disease live with a great deal of stress and are in need of help and support. Many families are either not aware of their rights or too exhausted to seek help.
PubMed ID
10081352 View in PubMed
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Daughters' obligation to care in the context of past abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139489
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2010 Dec;31(12):1047-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Judith Wuest
Jean Malcolm
Marilyn Merritt-Gray
Author Affiliation
Department of Graduate Studies, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. wuest@unb.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2010 Dec;31(12):1047-67
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Child Abuse
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Moral Obligations
Nuclear Family - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Psychological Theory
Abstract
Using theoretical sampling, we extended a previous grounded theory study of women's caring through interviews with 16 women currently giving care to parents who had abused them as children to more fully understand daughters' obligation to care in the context of past abuse. Past relationship was characterized by emotional distance, "never being good enough," degradation, control, and unpredictability. Obligation to care was grounded not only in duty to others but also in duty to self. Caregiving was seen as an opportunity for validation and reconciliation. These findings advance knowledge by illuminating how survivors of child maltreatment become caregivers for their abusers.
PubMed ID
21058090 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.