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A 3-year follow-up after anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272920
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Collagen
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - epidemiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Surgical Mesh
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To compare the 1-year (previously published) and 3-year objective and subjective cure rates, and complications, related to the use of a collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse against a conventional anterior repair.
Randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
A total of 138 women, of 55 years of age or older, admitted for stage =2 anterior vaginal wall prolapse.
The women scheduled for primary anterior vaginal wall prolapse surgery were randomised between conventional anterior colporrhaphy and surgery with a collagen-coated prolene mesh. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) assessment before and after surgery. Symptoms related to pelvic organ prolapse were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20).
Objective cure, defined as POP-Q stage
PubMed ID
26420345 View in PubMed
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A 10-year retrospective study of interhospital patient transport using inhaled nitric oxide in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269280
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
C. Buskop
P P Bredmose
M. Sandberg
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care
Equipment Failure - statistics & numerical data
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Norway
Respiratory Insufficiency - mortality - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Tertiary Care Centers
Transportation of Patients
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaesthesiologists from Oslo University Hospital have transported patients with severe oxygenation failure with inhaled nitric oxide (usually 20?ppm) from other hospitals to a tertiary care centre since 2002 in an effort to reduce the number of patients that otherwise would require transport with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient safety during transport with inhaled nitric oxide.
All patient transports with ongoing nitric oxide treatment undertaken from 2003 to 2012 were identified in the transport database. The frequency of adverse events and their impact on patient safety were studied in addition to response to inhaled nitric oxide and adjusted intensive care treatment and time aspects of the transports. Information about in-hospital treatment and survival were extracted from the hospital patient records.
Adverse events were recorded in 12 of the 104 transports. Seven of the adverse events were due to malfunctioning technical equipment, three were related to medication other than the inhaled nitric oxide and two were related to ventilation. No adverse events resulted in permanent negative patient consequences or in discontinuation of the transport. Out of 104 patients, 79 responded to treatment with inhaled nitric oxide and other treatment changes by an increase in oxygen saturation of more than 5%. The 30-day mortality was 27% in the group transported with inhaled nitric oxide.
Transporting patients on inhaled nitric oxide is an alternative in selected patients who would otherwise require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during transport.
PubMed ID
25782015 View in PubMed
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A 25-year follow-up study of drug addicts hospitalised for acute hepatitis: present and past morbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7324
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Susanne Rogne Gjeruldsen
Bjørn Myrvang
Stein Opjordsmoen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. s.m.r.gieruldsen@iwoks.uio.no
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2003 Apr;9(2):80-6
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Rehabilitation, Vocational - statistics & numerical data
Skin Diseases, Infectious - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Environment
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate present and past morbidity in drug addicts, 25 years after hospitalisation for acute hepatitis B or hepatitis nonA-nonB. The hospital records for 214 consecutively admitted patients were analysed, and a follow-up study on 66 of the 144 patients still alive was performed. At follow-up, 1 of 54 (1.8%) hepatitis B patients was still HBsAg positive. Twelve patients originally diagnosed as hepatitis nonA-nonB were all among 54 found to be anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) positive, and the total anti-HCV prevalence was 81.8%. Twelve (22.2%) of the HCV cases were unknown before the follow-up examination. Four (6.1%) participants were anti-human immunodeficiency virus positive, only 1 was on antiretroviral therapy, and none had developed AIDS. Other chronic somatic diseases were a minor problem, whereas drug users reported skin infections as a frequent complication. Forty-three patients (65%) had abandoned addictive drugs since the hospital stay. Serious mental disorders were reported by 19 patients (28.8%), and 17 (25.8%) regarded themselves as present (9) and former (8) compulsive alcohol drinkers. A large proportion of the participants were granted disability pension (39%), a majority because of psychiatric disorders, drug and alcohol abuse.
PubMed ID
12644734 View in PubMed
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ABCB1 and GST polymorphisms associated with TP53 status in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78779
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Feb;17(2):127-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Nordgard Silje H
Ritchie Marylyn D
Jensrud Sigrid D
Motsinger Alison A
Alnaes Grethe I G
Lemmon Gordon
Berg Marianne
Geisler Stephanie
Moore Jason H
Lønning Per Eystein
Børresen-Dale Anne-Lise
Kristensen Vessela N
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Feb;17(2):127-36
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - enzymology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Doxorubicin - therapeutic use
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione S-Transferase pi - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium - genetics
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Norway
Organic Anion Transporters - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Recombination, Genetic
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Many environmental and genetic factors influence the development of chemoresistance. The goal of this study was to characterize the genetic variation in the ABCB1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes, as well as the haplotype structure in the ABCB1 gene. METHODS: Variants in these genes were studied in 109 healthy controls and 93 breast cancer cases, both of Caucasian origin. The cases were analyzed in relation to TP53 mutation status and response to doxorubicin. Both single and multiple single nucleotide polymorphism analyses were performed. RESULTS: Chi-square analyses revealed a significant association between TP53 mutation status and both the GA genotype of ABCB1 exon 11 (Ser400Asn) and the GG genotype of GSTP1 (Ile105Val; P
PubMed ID
17301692 View in PubMed
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Abnormal uterine bleeding refractory to medical therapy assessed by saline infusion sonohysterography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145104
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Mar;89(3):367-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Kim Hauge
Erling Ekerhovd
Seth Granberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Kim.Hauge@unn.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Mar;89(3):367-72
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy - statistics & numerical data
Hysteroscopy
Middle Aged
Norway
Premenopause
Prospective Studies
Sodium Chloride - diagnostic use
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive
Treatment Outcome
Uterine Hemorrhage - pathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Abstract
The primary aim of the study was to assess the incidence of intracavitary pathology visualized by saline infusion sonohysterography (SIS) in premenopausal women suffering from abnormal uterine bleeding refractory to medical therapy. Secondary aims were to evaluate the clinical course when a minimally invasive therapeutic approach was applied and to examine the need for hysterectomy in this group of women over a follow-up period of two years.
Prospective cohort study.
Tertiary referral university hospital.
Between February 2004 and June 2006, 104 premenopausal women suffering from abnormal uterine bleeding refractory to medical treatment were included.
Transvaginal ultrasonography and SIS were performed as first line procedures of the investigation. Hysteroscopy was undertaken for removal of focal intrauterine anomalies. Hysterectomy was only carried out when other approaches failed or were regarded as unsuitable. Women who did not undergo hysterectomy had regular follow-up consultations for at least two years.
Incidence of intrauterine focal anomalies, clinical course, and need for hysterectomy.
Following saline infusion sonohysterograhy intracavitary anomalies were visualized in 58 (55.8%) women. Over the follow-up period 80 women had successful minimally invasive treatment, while 24 women underwent hysterectomy.
The study shows that focal intracavitary lesions are common in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding refractory to medical treatment. By applying minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic approaches acceptable bleeding patterns can be re-established in most cases, thereby resulting in a low rate of hysterectomies.
PubMed ID
20199353 View in PubMed
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Absence of relationship between tuberculin reactivity and asthmatic symptoms, level of FEV1 and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in BCG vaccinated young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15399
Source
Allergy. 2002 Apr;57(4):336-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
H F Jentoft
E. Omenaas
G E Eide
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Apr;57(4):336-40
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
BCG Vaccine - therapeutic use
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking
Treatment Outcome
Tuberculin - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some recent studies have suggested that bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination or mycobacterial infection early in life is inversely related to asthma. We wondered if an increase in tuberculin reactivity was inversely related to commonly used indices of asthma in a population of young adults who were BCG vaccinated at age 14. METHODS: Men and women aged 20-44 years, randomly selected from the general population, were tuberculin tested with the epinephrine-Pirquet method with Norwegian-produced synthetic medium tuberculin (n = 588). In addition they were interviewed using eight questions on asthma symptoms and medication. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness were also tested. RESULTS: Altogether 95% of those studied had been BCG vaccinated at age 14 (n = 558). In the 386 subjects with complete examinations, there was no relationship between a positive tuberculin reaction (> or = 4 mm) and asthma symptoms or use of asthma medication. Furthermore we did not observe any relationship between a positive tuberculin reaction and the level of forced expiratory volume (FEV1) or a positive bronchial responsiveness test, assessed as the percent of predicted of FEV1 and PD20
PubMed ID
11906365 View in PubMed
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Abstinence-orientated buprenorphine replacement therapy for young adults in out-patient counselling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82423
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Mar;25(2):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Kornør Hege
Waal Helge
Ali Robert L
Author Affiliation
Unit for Addiction Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. hege.kornor@kunnskapssenteret.no
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Mar;25(2):123-30
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Buprenorphine - administration & dosage
Counseling
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Male
Narcotic Antagonists - administration & dosage
Norway
Opioid-Related Disorders - drug therapy
Outpatients
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study assessed treatment retention, compliance and completion of a 9-month buprenorphine replacement programme. In addition, changes in drug use and other relevant variables, as well as predictors of completion, were examined. Seventy-five opioid-dependent out-patients (mean age 26 years; 33% females) who aimed for opioid abstinence were enrolled into the study. Assessments were undertaken prior to buprenorphine induction and again at 3, 6 and 9 months. Forty patients (53%) completed the buprenorphine programme. At 9 months, 67 patients (87%) were still in counselling. Mean attendance rates for buprenorphine dosing and counselling sessions were 0.91 and 0.74, respectively. There were significant and persistent reductions in drug use during treatment with, however, a reversed tendency in the 9th month. Psychiatric problems escalated at 9 months, and three patients died during the detoxification phase. Completion was predicted by fewer previous treatment episodes. Detoxification from buprenorphine is associated with substantial psychological distress and an increased death risk. Buprenorphine replacement therapy should be continued until the patient chooses to leave, and close monitoring during the detoxification phase is essential.
PubMed ID
16627301 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy preceded by an experimental Attention Bias Modification procedure in recurrent depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299363
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Mar-27-2018
Author
Tom Østergaard
Tobias Lundgren
Robert Zettle
Rune Jonassen
Catherine J Harmer
Tore C Stiles
Nils Inge Landrø
Vegard Øksendal Haaland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sørlandet Hospital, Arendal, Norway. tom.ostergaard@sshf.no.
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Date
Mar-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attentional Bias
Depression - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Remission Induction
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This project studies the effect of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) following Attention Bias Modification (ABM) on residual symptoms in recurrent depression. ACT is a cognitive-behavioral intervention combining acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior-change processes. ACT enjoys modest empirical support in treating depression and has also shown promising results in secondary prevention of depression. The experimental cognitive bias modification (ABM) procedure has been shown to reduce surrogate markers of depression vulnerability in patients in remission from depression. The aim of the current project is to investigate if the effect of group-based ACT on reducing residual depressive symptoms can be enhanced by preceding it with ABM. Also, assessment of the relationship between conceptually relevant therapeutic processes and outcome will be investigated.
An invitation to participate in this project was extended to 120 individuals within a larger sample who had just completed a separate randomized, multisite, clinical trial (referred to hereafter as Phase 1) in which they received either ABM (n = 60) or a control condition without bias modification (n = 60). This larger Phase-1 sample consisted of 220 persons with a history of at least two episodes of major depression who were currently in remission or not fulfilling the criteria of major depression. After its inclusion, Phase-1 participants from the Sørlandet site (n = 120) were also recruited for this study in which they received an 8-week group-based ACT intervention. Measures will be taken immediately after Phase 1, 1 month, 2 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the conclusion of Phase 1.
This study sequentially combines acceptable, nondrug interventions from neuropsychology and cognitive-behavioral psychology in treating residual symptoms in depression. The results will provide information about the effectiveness of treatment and on mechanisms and processes of change that may be valuable in understanding and further developing ABM and ACT, combined and alone.
ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02648165 . Registered on 6 January 2016.
PubMed ID
29587807 View in PubMed
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Accounting for individual differences and timing of events: estimating the effect of treatment on criminal convictions in heroin users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261868
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jo Røislien
Thomas Clausen
Jon Michael Gran
Anne Bukten
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:68
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Crime - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Criminals - legislation & jurisprudence
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Heroin Dependence - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The reduction of crime is an important outcome of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). Criminal intensity and treatment regimes vary among OMT patients, but this is rarely adjusted for in statistical analyses, which tend to focus on cohort incidence rates and rate ratios. The purpose of this work was to estimate the relationship between treatment and criminal convictions among OMT patients, adjusting for individual covariate information and timing of events, fitting time-to-event regression models of increasing complexity.
National criminal records were cross linked with treatment data on 3221 patients starting OMT in Norway 1997-2003. In addition to calculating cohort incidence rates, criminal convictions was modelled as a recurrent event dependent variable, and treatment a time-dependent covariate, in Cox proportional hazards, Aalen's additive hazards, and semi-parametric additive hazards regression models. Both fixed and dynamic covariates were included.
During OMT, the number of days with criminal convictions for the cohort as a whole was 61% lower than when not in treatment. OMT was associated with reduced number of days with criminal convictions in all time-to-event regression models, but the hazard ratio (95% CI) was strongly attenuated when adjusting for covariates; from 0.40 (0.35, 0.45) in a univariate model to 0.79 (0.72, 0.87) in a fully adjusted model. The hazard was lower for females and decreasing with older age, while increasing with high numbers of criminal convictions prior to application to OMT (all p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24886472 View in PubMed
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Achievement of Remission and Low Disease Activity Definitions in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Clinical Practice: Results from the NOR-DMARD Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278963
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Apr;43(4):716-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Till Uhlig
Elisabeth Lie
Vibeke Norvang
Åse Stavland Lexberg
Erik Rødevand
Frode Krøll
Synøve Kalstad
Inge C Olsen
Tore K Kvien
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Apr;43(4):716-23
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Remission Induction
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the frequency of 6 definitions for remission and 4 definitions for low disease activity (LDA) after starting a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice, and to study whether predictors for achieving remission after 6 months are similar for these definitions.
Remission and LDA were calculated according to the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), the Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI), the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI), the Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data (RAPID3), and both the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Boolean remission definitions 3 and 6 months after 4992 DMARD prescriptions for patients enrolled in the NOR-DMARD, a 5-center Norwegian register. Prediction of remission after 6 months was also studied.
After 3 months, remission rates varied between definitions from 8.7% to 22.5% and for LDA from 35.5% to 42.7%, and increased slightly until 6 months of followup. DAS28 and RAPID3 gave the highest and ACR/EULAR, SDAI, and CDAI the lowest proportions for remission. Positive predictors for remission after 6 months were similar across the definitions and included lower age, male sex, short disease duration, high level of education, current nonsmoking, nonerosive disease, treatment with a biological DMARD, being DMARD-naive, good physical function, little fatigue, and LDA.
In daily clinical practice, the DAS28 and RAPID3 definitions identified remission about twice as often as the ACR/EULAR Boolean, SDAI, and CDAI. Predictors of remission were similar across remission definitions. These findings provide additional evidence to follow treatment recommendations and treat RA early with a DMARD.
PubMed ID
26879358 View in PubMed
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920 records – page 1 of 92.