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558 records – page 1 of 56.

3-Year follow-up of secondary chronic headaches: the Akershus study of chronic headache.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141854
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kjersti Aaseth
Ragnhild Berling Grande
Jurate Ĺ altyte Benth
Christofer Lundqvist
Michael Bjørn Russell
Author Affiliation
Head and Neck Research Group, Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. kjersti.aaseth@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Headache Disorders, Secondary - etiology - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Rhinitis - complications
Severity of Illness Index
Sinusitis - complications
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the 3-year course of secondary chronic headaches (?15days per month for at least 3months) in the general population. An age and gender stratified random sample of 30,000 persons aged 30-44years from the general population received a mailed questionnaire. All with self-reported chronic headache, 517 in total, were interviewed by neurological residents. The questionnaire response rate was 71%. The rate of participation in the initial and follow-up interview was 74% (633/852) and 87% (83/95) respectively. The International Classification of Headache Disorders was used, and then in the next step the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group and American Academy of Otolaryngology criteria were used in relation to cervicogenic headache (CEH) and headache attributed to chronic rhinosinusitis (HACRS). Of those followed-up, 40 had headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma (chronic posttraumatic headache), 0 had CEH and 0 had HACRS according to the ICHD-II criteria, while 18 had CEH according to the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group's criteria, and 37 had HACRS according to the criteria of the American Academy of Otolaryngology. The headache index (frequency×intensity×duration) was significantly reduced from baseline to follow-up in chronic posttraumatic headache and HACRS, but not in CEH. We conclude that secondary chronic headaches seem to have various course dependent of subtype. Recognizing the different types of secondary chronic headaches is of importance because it might have management implications.
PubMed ID
20667753 View in PubMed
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Access to specialized health care for asthmatic children in Norway: the significance of parents' educational background and social network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82112
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Sep;63(5):1316-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Finnvold Jon Erik
Author Affiliation
Statistics Norway, Oslo. jef@ssb.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Sep;63(5):1316-27
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - therapy
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Educational Status
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Hospitals, Public
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Abstract
What determines access to the Voksentoppen Children's Asthma and Allergy Centre, the most specialized health care facility for asthmatic children in Norway? This publicly funded national institution is mandated to serve all segments of the population equally. The paper reports from the experiences of families with children having a confirmed diagnosis of moderate to severe asthma. The study population was selected from a national register of state cash-benefit recipients. Within this register, all families with a child under the age of 9 and with the diagnosis of asthma at the end of 1997 were selected (N = 2564). Further information about the population was gathered in a postal survey. It was found that access to the facility, measured as at least one admission during the period of the disease, was primarily determined by variations in morbidity. In particular, measures of health condition that presupposed a professional's evaluation of the child's health condition were significant. In addition, access was influenced by several factors not directly related to the need for treatment. Notably, children from families in which parents had a graduate education were over-represented among those with access to the top level of the institution's medical hierarchy. Multivariate analysis was used to search for causal mechanisms. It was found that families with a doctor in their social network had greater likelihood of access, and this in part accounted for the observed association between education and access. The pattern of access was also influenced by geographical factors, but not in a way that reduced the significance of educational background. Membership of, and participation in, patient organizations also increased the families' chances of receiving top-level professional treatment. The results depart from professional norms and officially stated health policy in Norway, which assert that health condition is the only valid criterion for allocating scarce medical goods.
PubMed ID
16725246 View in PubMed
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Achievement of Remission and Low Disease Activity Definitions in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Clinical Practice: Results from the NOR-DMARD Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278963
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Apr;43(4):716-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Till Uhlig
Elisabeth Lie
Vibeke Norvang
Åse Stavland Lexberg
Erik Rødevand
Frode Krøll
Synøve Kalstad
Inge C Olsen
Tore K Kvien
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Apr;43(4):716-23
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Remission Induction
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the frequency of 6 definitions for remission and 4 definitions for low disease activity (LDA) after starting a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice, and to study whether predictors for achieving remission after 6 months are similar for these definitions.
Remission and LDA were calculated according to the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), the Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI), the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI), the Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data (RAPID3), and both the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Boolean remission definitions 3 and 6 months after 4992 DMARD prescriptions for patients enrolled in the NOR-DMARD, a 5-center Norwegian register. Prediction of remission after 6 months was also studied.
After 3 months, remission rates varied between definitions from 8.7% to 22.5% and for LDA from 35.5% to 42.7%, and increased slightly until 6 months of followup. DAS28 and RAPID3 gave the highest and ACR/EULAR, SDAI, and CDAI the lowest proportions for remission. Positive predictors for remission after 6 months were similar across the definitions and included lower age, male sex, short disease duration, high level of education, current nonsmoking, nonerosive disease, treatment with a biological DMARD, being DMARD-naive, good physical function, little fatigue, and LDA.
In daily clinical practice, the DAS28 and RAPID3 definitions identified remission about twice as often as the ACR/EULAR Boolean, SDAI, and CDAI. Predictors of remission were similar across remission definitions. These findings provide additional evidence to follow treatment recommendations and treat RA early with a DMARD.
PubMed ID
26879358 View in PubMed
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Acne and dairy products in adolescence: results from a Norwegian longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286570
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
M. Ulvestad
E. Bjertness
F. Dalgard
J A Halvorsen
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acne Vulgaris - epidemiology
Adolescent
Animals
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats - analysis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Milk - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acne is a very common skin condition, and it is of great interest to elucidate lifestyle factors that may contribute to its occurrence. In the last decade, the acne-diet connection has been brought back to credibility.
To examine whether high intakes of dairy products in early adolescence is associated with moderate to severe acne in later adolescence.
The study is a longitudinal, questionnaire-based population study of Norwegian adolescents. Students attending the 10th grade (15-16 years old) of compulsory schooling in Oslo in 2000-2001 and the 13th grade (18-19 years old) 3 years later, in 2004, were invited. Dairy product consumption was self-reported at age 15-16 and acne severity was self-assessed and reported at age 18-19.
The overall prevalence of moderate to severe acne was 13.9%. High intakes (=2 glasses per day) of full-fat dairy products were associated with moderate to severe acne. In boys with exclusively high intakes of full-fat dairy products, the odds ratio for acne was 4.81 (1.59-14.56). A high total intake of dairy products was associated with acne in girls (OR 1.80, 1.02-3.16). No significant associations were found between acne and intake of semi-skimmed or skimmed dairy products, and not with moderate intakes of any fat variety of dairy products.
This study shows association between high intakes of dairy products and acne in adolescence. Our findings support a hypothesis suggesting that dairy consumption may be a factor contributing to acne. The study is based on multiple hypothesis testing, and the methodological limitations must be considered when interpreting the results.
PubMed ID
27422392 View in PubMed
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[Activity registration in intensive care units].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195094
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):682-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2001
Author
R. Haagensen
B. Jamtli
H. Moen
O. Stokland
Author Affiliation
Postoperativ/intensivavdelingen Kirurgisk divisjon Ullevål sykehus.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):682-5
Date
Feb-28-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - manpower - standards - utilization
Norway
Nursing Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Intensive care treatment is expensive and its capacity is limited. The population of elderly patients with greater need for intensive care increases. It has become more important to evaluate the use of intensive care resources and to compare it with the results of treatment. Diagnoses do not provide a satisfactory description of the stay in the intensive care unit. Scoring systems for severity of illness and for resource needs are therefore of great value. The Norwegian Board of Health has requested all intensive care units in Norway to describe their activities by scoring systems for severity of illness, SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score II) and for use of resources NEMS (Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower Use Score). The systems are generally well recognised, easy to learn and not time-consuming. Through SAPS II and NEMS it is possible to compare results of treatment and use of resources across intensive care units or against a standard.
PubMed ID
11293348 View in PubMed
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Acute mastoiditis: predictors for surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32849
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2000 Apr 15;52(2):149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2000
Author
E. Kvestad
K J Kvaerner
I W Mair
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ullevål University Hospital, N-0407, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2000 Apr 15;52(2):149-55
Date
Apr-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Mastoiditis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Otologic Surgical Procedures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To estimate the incidence of acute mastoiditis and identify predictors for mastoid surgery, a retrospective case record study of 38 children hospitalised for acute mastoiditis in Oslo from 1989 to 1998 was performed. Median age at diagnosis was 18 months and 13 (34%) of the children received mastoidectomy. Compared to the period 1970-1979, the incidence of mastoidectomy was significantly reduced. Only seven children (18%) had experienced acute otitis media prior to the current episode. Symptom duration of 6 days or more prior to hospitalisation and elevated white blood cell counts and C-reactive Protein were predictive for mastoidectomy ((OR = 5.0 (1.0-22.8), (OR = 24.5 (2.5-240) and OR = 10.5 (1-108.8)). Furthermore, total time from symptom onset to hospital discharge was significantly higher in children who received mastoidectomy. We suggest early referral to an otolaryngologic department in children suspected of acute mastoiditis.
PubMed ID
10767462 View in PubMed
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Acute pancreatitis in Bergen, Norway. A study on incidence, etiology and severity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9485
Source
Scand J Surg. 2004;93(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
H. Gislason
A. Horn
D. Hoem
A. Andrén-Sandberg
A K Imsland
O. Søreide
A. Viste
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. hjorturg@landspitali.is
Source
Scand J Surg. 2004;93(1):29-33
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies on the incidence and etiology of acute pancreatitis show large regional differences. This study was performed to establish incidence, etiology and severity of acute pancreatitis in the population of Bergen, Norway. METHODS: A study of all patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to Haukeland University Hospital over a 10-year period was performed. Information was obtained about the number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the Deaconess Hospital in Bergen. RESULTS: A total of 978 admissions of acute pancreatitis were recorded in these two hospitals giving an incidence of 30.6 per 100,000. Haukeland University Hospital had 757 admissions of acute pancreatitis in 487 patients. Pancreatitis was severe in 20% (96/487) of patients, more often in males (25%) than in females (14%). Mortality due to acute pancreatitis was 3% (16/487). Gallstones were found to be an etiological factor in 48.5% and alcohol consumption in 19% of patients. The risk of recurrent pancreatitis was 47% in alcohol induced and 17% in gallstone induced pancreatitis. The last five years of the study period, endoscopic sphincterotomy of patients with gallstone pancreatitis, resulted in drop in relapse rate from 33% to 1.6%. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute pancreatitis was found to be 30.6 per 100,000 with 48.5% associated with gallstones and 17% alcohol induced. Incidence of first attack was 20/100,000. Pancreatitis was classified as severe in 20% of cases with a mortality of 3%.
PubMed ID
15116816 View in PubMed
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Acute-Phase Fatigue Predicts Limitations with Activities of Daily Living 18 Months after First-Ever Stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283199
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2017 Mar;26(3):523-531
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Anners Lerdal
Caryl L Gay
Source
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2017 Mar;26(3):523-531
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics as Topic
Stroke - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Stroke rehabilitation
Abstract
Fatigue during the acute phase following stroke has been shown to predict long-term physical health, specifically increased bodily pain and poorer self-rated general health. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether acute-phase fatigue also predicts patients' limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) 18 months after the first stroke.
Patients with first-ever stroke (N?=?88) were recruited upon admission at 2 hospitals in Norway. Patients were assessed within 2 weeks following admission and at 18 months using the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (BI), Fatigue Severity Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory II. The relationship between acute-phase fatigue and later activity limitations (BI?
PubMed ID
28040378 View in PubMed
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Acute poisonings treated in hospitals in Oslo: a one-year prospective study (II): clinical outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93789
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):42-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Heyerdahl Fridtjof
Bjornas Mari A
Hovda Knut Erik
Skog Karina
Opdahl Anders
Wium Cecilie
Ekeberg Oivind
Jacobsen Dag
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. fridtjof.heyerdahl@medisin.uio.no
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):42-9
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidotes - therapeutic use
Coma - chemically induced
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Flumazenil - therapeutic use
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naloxone - therapeutic use
Norway
Poisoning - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Street Drugs - poisoning
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The changing pattern of acute poisoning may affect complications and outcome in these patients. An update study on acute poisonings was therefore performed and compared to similar data from 1980. DESIGN. A prospective cross-sectional multi-center study of all adult patients (> or = 16 years) hospitalized in Oslo with a main diagnosis of acute poisoning, irrespective of intention, over a one-year period. RESULTS. Of 947 admissions, 222 (23%) were comatose. Complications were observed in 173 (18%), slightly reduced from 1980 (22%). Ten (1.1%) died and six (0.6%) got permanent sequelae, of which seven and five were drug- or alcohol-related, respectively. Seventy-five percent received treatment besides observation; 39% received antidotes, increased from 21% in 1980, most frequently flumazenil (23%) and naloxone (14%). CONCLUSIONS. In-hospital mortality in poisoned patients remained low, few patients entailed complications, and most patients survived without permanent sequelae. Drug- and alcohol-abuse related poisonings were most severe.
PubMed ID
18167036 View in PubMed
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Acute psychological reactions in assault victims of non-domestic violence: peritraumatic dissociation, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79450
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Johansen Venke A
Wahl Astrid K
Eilertsen Dag Erik
Hanestad Berit R
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway. venke.johansen@isf.uib.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dissociative Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate acute and subacute post-traumatic reactions in victims of physical non-domestic violence. A Norwegian sample of 138 physically assaulted victims was interviewed and a questionnaire was completed. The following areas were examined: the frequency and intensity of acute and subacute psychological reactions such as peritraumatic dissociation (PD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety and depression; the relationship between several psychological reactions; the relationship between psychological reactions and level of physical injury, perceived life threat, and potential of severe physical injury, and the relationship between psychological reactions and socio-demographic variables. The following distress reactions were measured retrospectively: PD, PTSD, and anxiety and depression. Thirty-three per cent of the victims scored as probable PTSD cases according to the Post Traumatic Symptoms Scale 10 (PTSS-10); the corresponding Impact of Event Scale-15 (IES-15) score identified prevalence of 34% respectively. Forty-four per cent scored as cases with probable anxiety and depression, according to the Hopkins Symptom Check List 25 (HSCL-25). Severity of perceived threat predicted higher scores on all measures of psychological reactions. There were no statistically significant differences between acute and subacute groups on PD, PTSS-10, IES-15, IES-22 and HSCL-25 according to measured means (and standard deviations) and occurrence of probable cases and risk level cases. The results showed no connection between severity of physical injury and caseness. The acute psychological impairment that results from assault violence may have a deleterious effect on the mental health of victims.
PubMed ID
17162453 View in PubMed
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558 records – page 1 of 56.